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How hard is it to learn Java when you've never done any programming before, ANY. Is Java a good place to start? How hard is it, can it be self taugh efficiently? Are there better options, as for programming languagas as a beginner?
2018-07-13 00:01
you should start from c++
2018-07-13 00:03
Any particular reason why?
2018-07-13 00:05
#12
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Paraguay HighAlching 
it will be much harder to learn, but once you know c++ other languages like java will be really easy to understand
2018-07-13 00:08
Since I am complete beginner though, would it be smart to start with a harder one?
2018-07-13 00:09
#26
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Paraguay HighAlching 
it depends on how easy/hard it is for you and how much you are willing to learn, if you are serious about programming and want to work in this field then yes it would probably be useful to learn c++ first. If you want to do games programming that requires high efficiency then you must learn c++, but if you are just doing it as a hobby then learning something simpler like Java should be enough and not require you to spend too much time on it
2018-07-13 00:50
Okay man, thanks for your input.
2018-07-13 00:51
hi im learing cpp aswell right now and have some trouble with bit operators. do u use them much in actual programming
2018-07-13 17:38
c++ for game programming is bs unless you get hired right away to some AAA company. Truth is that if you want a job in AAA game studios then you'll need x amount of years of experience in game dev and the best and pretty much only options are unity & unreal (and unity is way more common) And as we know unity uses c#
2018-07-13 18:42
#43
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Bulgaria squezzi 
Don't start with C++
2018-07-13 16:03
you should start with: - what variables and constants means - what `int`, `char` etc. means (including vectors) - how to use `if`, `for, `switch`, `while`, `do {} while()` - functions (how to create, how to call them from another function, the type of them: void, int, bool etc) - struct and class (object oriented programming) and maybe how to use an interface etc. Then you can study algorithms, backtracking etc. Obviously, you can test them in Java. Now, you can code in whatever language you want.
2018-07-13 16:36
Any great videos/courses/tutorials that can teach me said futures? Thanks.
2018-07-13 16:47
gyazo.com/3479d129d4d56ac015bbe18216b5b7.. Also "int" is a variable if im not mistaken?
2018-07-13 17:43
#69
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Netherlands pewpeww 
Int (integer) is the type of variable, it cannot contain decimals you need to use a different type of variable for that. Strings is another type of variable which contains text, like: Int myInt = 10; Double myDouble = 10.10; String myString = "ten"; Java forces you to choose either one of those type (there are a lot more though, google it) this is called "strict typing". In other language (PHP for example) you can simply declare variables like this: $myInt = 10; $myString = "ten";
2018-07-13 18:19
Okay man, thanks for the clarification. What would be a easy thing so try making at first? A calculator, a simple snake game or Tic-tac-toe or something?
2018-07-13 18:22
#71
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Netherlands pewpeww 
Hmm, are you following some kind of Java course? Does it not include examples and assignments on stuff you need to write? Because first you need to do some practice with stuff said by IlusionMevid, only then you can start applying them in actual "applications". Because if I ask you now to write a hangman game, or space invaders for example you would not know where to start, do you? What did you learn so far, you started today or yesterday didn't you?
2018-07-13 18:26
Started today at a udemy course someone in the thread suggested. Haven't learned too much yet, gonna get back on it as soon as I get back home, to hopefully learn more.
2018-07-13 18:28
#74
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Netherlands pewpeww 
Good, its important you practice all the topics properly, multiple times so you actually remember them. I am sure the course will give you not only examples but also assignments later on when you have some basics right. If you want I can look at your code anytime for review or give you tips and advice if you like. I work as software engineer for years, studied application development, computer science and software engineering, so I know a thing or two :p
2018-07-13 18:30
Thanks for that man, Im sure that would help alot when I get further in!
2018-07-13 18:31
#76
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Netherlands pewpeww 
How old are you btw?
2018-07-13 18:31
19. Starting late as I already have a job and I'm doing this as a hobby, for now anyway.
2018-07-13 18:32
#79
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Netherlands pewpeww 
Oh, enough time! You will need lots of motivation and discipline though if you want to do it besides your job.
2018-07-13 18:35
I commute, meaning I have 2 weeks of work and 2 weeks home, time is not a problem, besides I need anything to do in said sapretime.
2018-07-13 18:36
#82
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Netherlands pewpeww 
Oh that makes things a lot easier, let me know if you need any help. I want to tell you so much more, gitlab for example. But I don't want to give you an overload of information haha.
2018-07-13 18:41
Haha thanks, I will let you know as I get longer :P
2018-07-13 18:41
#2
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Turkey SLendeRuLeZ 
*Is Java a good place to start? No *How hard is it, can it be self taugh efficiently? Depends on your mentality but definitely very hard If no other knowledge about programminmg. *How hard is it, can it be self taugh efficiently? Everything can be self taught with the right mentality and resources, check some udemy courses. *Are there better options, as for programming languagas as a beginner? Python, or some other object oriented programming languages such C# or C++
2018-07-13 00:04
Okay, thanks for your respons.
2018-07-13 00:05
c# is really nice. I would recommend especially if you want learn by making games (Unity).
2018-07-13 18:44
#48
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Netherlands pewpeww 
Could you give some arguments to why you think Java is not the right place to start? I'm happy to hear then since I think the exact opposite.
2018-07-13 16:08
#51
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Turkey SLendeRuLeZ 
I mean doesn't matter with which language he is starting with but I believe its harder to learn the programming principles with java than other languages.
2018-07-13 16:10
#52
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Netherlands pewpeww 
Hmm, I would argue that C++ is harder to learn then Java. But that was just my experience :p
2018-07-13 16:11
start with python or ruby.
2018-07-13 00:04
Any particualar reason for this?
2018-07-13 00:06
Python is regarded as one of the best and easiest programming languages for beginners. It's a dynamically typed language which can be used anywhere(web/desktop/machine learning). Ruby kinda sucks, but it's easy to master and people still use it for web applications.
2018-07-13 00:10
Okay, thanks for your response, Python seems to be the most suggested so I guess I'll try it out.
2018-07-13 00:11
#6
GuardiaN | 
Belgium ZxTox 
.NET
2018-07-13 00:05
And why is that my friend?
2018-07-13 00:06
#14
GuardiaN | 
Belgium ZxTox 
great for beginners
2018-07-13 00:09
ok, ty for response.
2018-07-13 00:09
#9
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Denmark AircraftPilot 
start python, it will be easy then you should try java and if you are good you are gonna do this
2018-07-13 00:06
Okay man, apparently alot of people would start of will Python, so I guess I will have to check it out. Cheers.
2018-07-13 00:08
#10
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United States Brad_Bait 
It depends on what you want to, learning a programming language not knowing what to do with it is not so smart.
2018-07-13 00:07
#18
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Norway rogueplayer 
I see you have norwegian flag, min brusjan Alright, I'll explain. In Norway you should never use python or ruby, just saying, because jobs don't ask for too much for it. As for java, jobs do need it. But they also need c++ and basic front end skills. If you're totally a beginner I'd start with something easy, such as HTML, CSS and Javascript, just to get a feeling for it. Besides, there's tons of jobs asking for these particularly skills tbh. Then you should move to c++, java and .NET because the job market in Norway asks for this. Rarely have I seen python, but it's just a more friendlier version of c++, you could say Also, remember, once you start with programming you'll never be "finished" with it, everyday is a chance of learning something or improve on. It's a skill so makes sense
2018-07-13 00:17
Okay man thanks. Already have a job, but since I work 2 weeks on and 2 weeks off I find myself with too much sparetime so I'm looking for something to do in said sparetime. Maybe it would be a great job for me in the future if I ever get the hang of it though. Alot of people suggested Python, but if thats the case, I guess I should start off with HTML, my friend provided me with a site "w3schools" that seems appropiate. Thanks for your response.
2018-07-13 00:14
#23
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Norway rogueplayer 
No problem. HTML, CSS and Javascript is used interchangeably when making the front end of a website, but you'll know when you dive deep into it. These utilites is just a start to get a feeling of creating something. HTML is no where real back end programming, just you know
2018-07-13 00:19
Okay, just thought HTML would get me the feel of it, but I might as well just begin with CSS/Javascript then I suppose, Again, thanks for your input, given me some clarity.
2018-07-13 00:21
#50
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Finland SunMutsi 
Well you use CSS on HTML ;D
2018-07-13 16:10
#54
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Netherlands pewpeww 
HTML and CSS are used to create layouts and everything you visually see on a website (with a little help from JavaScript) but are not considered programming.
2018-07-13 16:12
#19
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Latvia teH9I 
if u wanna hardest code making, use Pascal
2018-07-13 00:12
Pascal is a language created to learn programming. Its not hard.
2018-07-13 16:14
#59
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Latvia teH9I 
so hard bro
2018-07-13 16:27
Start off with C#. Learn how to make console and desktop apps. After you aknowledge C# functions variable, loops, etc, you can go to other programming language. If you know how to program 1 language, you know how to program any other language (basics ofc) since all have the same "structure" and most of them use default methods.
2018-07-13 00:16
Thanks man, any "apps" where I could write codes that don't costs tons of money?
2018-07-13 00:18
Go to repl.it, wonderful website that i have used many times for c++ and works for other languages too.
2018-07-13 00:23
cheers
2018-07-13 00:55
You mean like write code? Well you could even use notepad++. But since you are looking for mainly coding apps, i would def recommend Brackets, Visual Studio Code and Sublime Text. Brackets is the best one imo. :) I dont really know if I understood your question xD...
2018-07-13 05:07
Thanks bro, yes you understood me correctly :P
2018-07-13 16:09
#28
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Bulgaria valeriaf0x 
if you've never programmed before u will get assraped by java
2018-07-13 00:55
python or classic c
2018-07-13 05:13
He should always start with an object oriented language so not c.
2018-07-13 09:04
Why should you start with an object oriented language? Why not something functional like Haskell or Scala? Who says you cant use C in an object oriented styel?
2018-07-13 15:53
Because of research and academic journals that shows that many people who learn programming struggle to learn OO programming if they start with another paradigm. If you want to work as a programmer you need OO knowledge and experience. C is not an OO language. Thats why C++ was made.
2018-07-13 15:59
#44
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Netherlands pewpeww 
Don't take what Hammondo says lightly (@y0fl0w & @j0rdfresern), he is right and as a software engineer I can relate. There is a huge difference between writing a couple script and actually programming software or applications. The way you write code (applied to any language), structure, object oriented and applying logic is in the long run more important then knowing the syntax of a single language.
2018-07-13 16:05
#32
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Australia t0rrent 
I started with C++ when I was 10 but moved to java while learning fundamentals of programming bc I wanted to make minecraft mods
2018-07-13 08:15
#33
Russia leld 
just start with any leanguage, you are going to work with many differet languages during your career anyway
2018-07-13 08:25
#34
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Ukraine Najara 
Learn Scala got phD - become stronk EZ PZ
2018-07-13 08:28
#35
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Netherlands Dust2isBest 
It's ok to start with Java if you follow a good course like this on udemy: udemy.com/java-the-complete-java-develop.. you can watch some vids to get a feeling of it for free. *totally not a spam
2018-07-13 08:50
#42
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Netherlands pewpeww 
Udemy is good, I followed courses for Linux and SELinux there. Good recommendation.
2018-07-13 16:02
Thanks man, I did end up buying it, it doesn't cost too much anyways and it'll probably help me out.
2018-07-13 17:36
#87
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Netherlands Dust2isBest 
nice. hf man
2018-07-13 19:00
So the 3 big languages at the moment are java, python, JavaScript. Python and JavaScript being the big growers in the market, growing at a crazy speed, while languages like c++ have been getting smaller. So always consider the markets. Python is probably the most popular first language to learn now. Very user friendly, very nice to read and write. I would suggest this. If you become a programmer you will naturally learn JavaScript at some point so don't worry about that's, it's mad easy once you understand the DOM.
2018-07-13 09:03
#46
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Netherlands pewpeww 
Python does look really clean yeah, nice syntax.
2018-07-13 16:07
I started in Java and went to python second and the difference is quite big. It made things easier for me to learn in a lot of ways, and because it works with indentation rather than brackets forced me to learn the importance of indentation for reading.
2018-07-13 16:08
#40
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Netherlands pewpeww 
Java is a good start because it is very structured. You learn how to write object oriented programs and learn strict typing. Once you know that, everything else is easier. I do not agree with starting with C++ at all. There is a reason most studies (bachelor) start with Java, because of its strong programming rules and wide variety of usage. (+ it runs on any system). I would advise going into C++ or C# later. So yes, even without any previous knowledge Java is a good place to start. Although having any experience with scripting helps alot. For example knowing what if-else statements are, while loops, for lus, basic functions etc. Personally I started with mSL (mIRC scripting language) when I was 13, moved on to PHP and only learned Java after that. Still Java is the language which told me how to write proper maintainable code, good structure and logic. Last note though, (depending on your age a bit) programming might be "easy" to get into and learn some basics but a programming language requires a lot of time (and practice) to master. I've seen to many people following a few simple courses online thinking they are fluent in a language but actually write crap code. My advise: Search a good teacher, somebody who can help you do code reviews and explains you more then these basic guides offer.
2018-07-13 16:00
Thanks for your replies man, you seem to have quite some knowledge on the matter so cheers.
2018-07-13 16:12
#55
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Netherlands pewpeww 
It only seems like that because you do not know anything yet. The more you know in this field, the more you realize you don't know. Good luck anyways!
2018-07-13 16:14
Thanks man.
2018-07-13 16:14
2018-07-13 17:31
#67
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Netherlands pewpeww 
Its a start!
2018-07-13 18:09
Yea at the end of the day the teacher will make a huge difference whatever language you start with.
2018-07-13 16:18
I agree with what most of what you said but people often fail to mention to someone starting to code is that a programming language it's like a tool, you can understand the tool all you want but what you really want is to know how to use it. For me the "knowing" how to use it comes from Algortithms and Data Structures studies, yet people never mention it, they just say "learn x or y language". There's a great online course from Professor Sedgwick from Princeton University on youtube, anyone learning to code should watch it (algorithms presented in Java)
2018-07-13 17:00
#68
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Netherlands pewpeww 
You are entirely right, and I agree that the language you write something is is merely the tool. When you are doing a certain project you have to decide on which language achieves your goals and even which model/structure you use within the language (as you said), but perhaps that is a few steps ahead for someone who doesn't even know what an simple if-else statement is. I could talk about the entire process before programming, the functional design, technical design, how to write proper ERD's, use cases, activity diagrams, or what acceptance testing means and how important the implementation process is. For now I think he might be best of just starting with a bit of Java programming, follow some courses so he can write small desktop applications (maybe web applications, learn about linux and tomcat in the meantime). Later he can focus more on anything else related to development. That's why I did not really include any of that in my initial post, but as I said you make a good point.
2018-07-13 18:15
Very difficult. If your considering getting a software engineering course I will ask you to do some java/any programming language ever first before wasting your time and money for the subject. Because when you step in that class the good students have already mastered prior to entering the course and you will struggle with it all semester long
2018-07-13 16:01
#45
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Ukraine ph3n0m3n 
Java is okay. It's very strict but it will teach you proper coding practices. After you get Java basics I suggest to move to the Kotlin kotlinlang.org/ - it will make coding much faster and also fix archaic Java language design.
2018-07-13 16:06
#73
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France Nez_Aigre 
Python is pretty easy for beginners, i recommend you to do the same .
2018-07-13 18:29
I would say start with Python as suggested, learn OOP, and then move on to Java if you want. I am still in my beginnings as well and i started with python, then to Java and Android programming. It is really mainly about knowing the syntax first and understanding objects, then it is about solving problems and lot of googling.
2018-07-13 18:35
#83
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Estonia teremartin 
html > java No Kappa
2018-07-13 18:41
start with pyton/javascript/ruby
2018-07-13 18:42
I started with Java and it was alright. You don't need to even learn every aspect of the language but use it to help you understand programming and then develop and move on to something like C++
2018-07-13 19:02
Cheers man, seems like a good idea considereing the amount of comments regarding this. Again, thanks.
2018-07-13 19:03
No problemo
2018-07-13 19:47
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