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Who ever can solve this gets free skins
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United States Topunderscore 
The displacement (in meters) of a particle moving in a straight line is given by the equation of motion s = 4/t2, where t is measured in seconds. Find the velocity of the particle at times t = a, t = 1, t = 2, and t = 3. plz need help on math homework. I believe you use the formula Lim (s(a+h) -s(a)) / (h) h->0
2019-09-12 15:29
math in 2019
2019-09-12 15:30
#2
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United States Topunderscore 
Heres my trade link to those who solve it, just comment your steam name with your answer and i'll send you some skins, probably worth around 3-6 dollars steamcommunity.com/tradeoffer/new/?partn..
2019-09-12 15:30
#7
kike | 
Mongolia ENCEphalon 
no knives or dlores, dont click
2019-09-12 15:34
#3
kNgV- | 
Brazil GMazzei 
2019-09-12 15:32
#8
kNgV- | 
Brazil GMazzei 
Btw, idk if this is correct, i'm an engineer, but i did calculus like 6 years ago
2019-09-12 15:46
#4
Portugal coldZ 
0
2019-09-12 15:32
How is this equation homogenic? We have s in meters and t in seconds so u say meters=1/s^2?
2019-09-12 15:32
#11
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India zCalibeRz 
that just means the 4 above is multiplied by a dimensional constant of (metres)(second)^2 to make the entire equation be in metres
2019-09-12 15:43
y=mx+b
2019-09-12 15:32
#9
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India zCalibeRz 
-8/a^3, -8, -1, -8/27 metres per second steam is caliber, skins plz
2019-09-12 15:45
Flag checks out
2019-09-12 15:43
#13
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United States Topunderscore 
hey i actually solved it before anyone here on my own, but ill still send you skins, my trade link is up there. Just send me an offer and ill counter with around 3 dollars worth of skins
2019-09-12 15:48
#15
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India zCalibeRz 
just did
2019-09-12 15:51
#14
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India sunnyleone 
+1
2019-09-12 15:49
If you differentiate the displacement equation with respect to t, you'll get the velocity equation v(t) = -8/t^3 Substitute in the values for t and there you go. Notice that the velocity is strictly decreasing and will eventually reach 0, this is logical since from the displacement equation as t approaches infinity, the displacement also tends towards 0.
2019-09-12 15:44
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