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Languages
Gustav | 
Sweden günT 
Let's talk mutual intelligibility. How much of other languages do you understand just from your ability to speak your own native language? e.g. if you're Polish could you have a conversation with a Czech person? Could you pick up on specifics from a Serbian convo or would you only understand the context?
2020-11-13 20:31
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English means I literally cannot understand any other language
2020-11-13 20:32
11 replies
nah when I was learning spanish, there were a lot of cognates. idk about being able to pick up on the absolute specifics, but you can sometimes get a general context of what people are talking about in public
2020-11-13 20:34
#4
Gustav | 
Sweden günT
Well English is a pretty unique example but surely you would be able to read Dutch and at least contextualize it
2020-11-13 20:34
9 replies
gimmie a sentence and I will try :D
2020-11-13 20:37
5 replies
#7
Gustav | 
Sweden günT
Bliksem is een elektrische ontlading in de atmosfeer die gepaard gaat met donder. De ontlading kan optreden doordat een groot potentiaalverschil is opgebouwd door ladingscheiding. Deze ladingscheiding kan optreden in onweersbuien, maar ook bij vulkaanuitbarstingen
2020-11-13 20:39
4 replies
oh yea what the actual fuck lol elektrische = electricity atmosfeer= atmosphere I suppose it's talking about lightning or something. B The rest is kinda rough though... lol vulkaanuitbarstingen = volcano from the root vulkan? :D
2020-11-13 20:41
1 reply
yeah those are the first few sentences of the dutch wiki page on lightning so you are, in fact, able to contextualize Dutch :D I understood the context pretty easily but then again I looked it up as well lul
2020-11-13 20:43
im kinda guessing in translating it into German: Blitze sind eine elektrische Entladung in die Atmosphäre die Donner verursachen ? i kinda get the rest too but its still hard lol
2020-11-13 21:33
1 reply
yeah it's too bad that high german is prevalent now and replaced all the low german dialects that were very close (or closer) to dutch.
2021-03-30 17:58
there are a lot of french influences in english. the closest language to english right now is frissian from northern netherlands. old english and old dutch were a little bit mutually comprehensible but it grew apart too much. english has saxon, viking, french influence while dutch has mostly frankish influence.
2021-03-30 17:56
2 replies
As a french speaker, there are many words in english that derive from french.
2021-03-30 20:13
1 reply
yes that's why in english there are many 'double' words. like guardian or warden. guardian is derived from french through the normans.
2021-03-31 17:12
#2
 | 
Brazil ilovenorway
i speak portuguese so i can understand spanish xD
2020-11-13 20:33
19 replies
#8
Gustav | 
Sweden günT
Not Italian? Can you hold a convo easily? Any Difference between a Spaniard and an Argentinian speaking?
2020-11-13 20:39
18 replies
#16
 | 
Germany I_car
I think Italian too but it's hard if it's not text
2020-11-13 20:42
14 replies
Do you understand Italian and Portuguese then?
2020-11-13 20:44
13 replies
I don't know if he can but I definitely do! Also a bit of French, but that's mostly because of Catalan Also when I was in Italy we could communicate with Italians speaking Spanish without much trouble, you could understand the general idea of sentences
2020-11-13 20:52
12 replies
Wut? You speak Catalan in Mallorca?
2020-11-13 20:57
11 replies
You didn't know? Also in Valencia
2020-11-13 20:59
10 replies
I had no clue lol. Thought Catalan was exclusive to Catalonia
2020-11-13 21:00
9 replies
en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Languages_of_Spa.. You have a map here where you can see languages spoken in Spain
2020-11-13 21:52
8 replies
But is there any support for Catalan independence in Valencia and the islands?
2020-11-13 21:56
7 replies
There is but it's a really small part There's also some people that want to create the "Catalan countries" with all regions that speak the language
2020-11-13 21:59
6 replies
But most of you want to remain part of Spain?
2020-11-13 22:07
5 replies
Yes, big majority of Valencia and the Balearic islands isn't independentist
2020-11-13 22:08
4 replies
one more question: how much spanish do you use? do you speak catalan constantly or only in personal proximities?
2020-11-13 23:00
3 replies
Only used Catalan in school tbh In villages people use Catalan as main language but in Palma most have Spanish as main
2020-11-13 23:09
2 replies
uni?
2020-11-13 23:07
1 reply
Well in uni you can write in both Spanish and Catalan
2020-11-13 23:09
#30
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Brazil renatorib
It's not common to listen to italian, but I think we can understand something yeah. Not as much as spanish tho
2020-11-13 20:46
we can, but Spanish is easier for Brazilians. <3. Just some words, not all
2020-11-13 20:47
italian just a little bit, yes i can hold a conversation in spanish even if i dont speak it perfectly, the difference btw those is just the accent and some different words :D
2020-11-13 20:48
#5
perk  | 
Finland eIe
I can understand some Estonian but speaking no chance
2020-11-13 20:36
5 replies
That's ok at least you've learnt Swedish😎
2020-11-13 20:40
4 replies
#18
perk  | 
Finland eIe
Yes I actually enjoy learning Swedish 😎👍
2020-11-13 20:43
3 replies
that's great. most of you colonial fellows aren't as thankful 😎👍
2020-11-13 20:44
#159
 | 
Finland xEd123
Why u gae
2020-11-14 00:08
1 reply
#162
perk  | 
Finland eIe
Not gae, I just enjoy languages 😎👌
2020-11-14 00:16
i arent speak anything
2020-11-13 20:40
2 replies
I'm painfully aware
2020-11-13 20:41
1 reply
acknowledged.
2020-11-13 20:41
#10
Fors | 
Brazil ricca
spanish and italian pretty easy
2020-11-13 20:40
#13
try | 
Italy ROMAG
i`m german and i can easily understand turkish, almost equal
2020-11-13 20:41
#20
 | 
Brazil renatorib
I can understand spanish people talking (like 85%? it depends on context), but I could not speak spanish. Although a spanish speaker maybe can understand if I speak portuguese too.
2020-11-13 20:44
14 replies
#25
perk  | 
Finland eIe
How different is Brazilian Portuguese compared to Portuguese Portuguese?
2020-11-13 20:45
11 replies
#41
fnx | 
Brazil vgzz
I think the biggest difference is why they use the conjugation in the most formalized way and their accent is very closed, so it is more difficult to understand than the Brazilian accent
2020-11-13 20:51
6 replies
#42
perk  | 
Finland eIe
I see 😎👍
2020-11-13 20:51
Isn't there a big difference in accent? I'm usually able to instantly tell that it's Portuguese if I hear a Brazilian person speaking but it usually takes me a while to differentiate from Spanish if it's an actual Portuguese person speaking.
2020-11-13 20:56
4 replies
#64
fnx | 
Brazil vgzz
yes, their accent is stronger and there are sounds like the "L" that change between the two portuguese, but even for us the portuguese of portugal is a little difficult to understand if they speak too fast kkkkkkk
2020-11-13 20:57
3 replies
#99
rmn | 
Portugal foozito
however, we can understand brazillians pretty well. Mainly because brazillian culture is big here in portugal
2020-11-13 21:32
2 replies
#148
fnx | 
Brazil vgzz
do you have Globo, SBT and Record on tv channels?
2020-11-13 23:39
1 reply
We have Globo, but it's not in public tv. But we have a public channel, SIC, that always have one novela brasileira playing ahah
2020-11-14 11:40
accent and context of some words.
2020-11-13 20:52
3 replies
#49
perk  | 
Finland eIe
Is it like American English-British English? Or more different?
2020-11-13 20:54
2 replies
#54
fnx | 
Brazil vgzz
yeah, same thing
2020-11-13 20:55
1 reply
#58
perk  | 
Finland eIe
Very nice 😎👌
2020-11-13 20:55
Can't understand much Portuguese, specially if it's Brazilian
2020-11-13 20:58
1 reply
For me brazilians are talking even faster EDIT: I think its because of Fallen and Cold are rapgods
2020-11-13 21:22
#22
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Moldova LightX
spanish italian and russian ez
2020-11-13 20:44
12 replies
I aren't think that
2020-11-13 20:45
11 replies
#31
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Moldova LightX
Romanian latin languague.i learned spanish in 3 months and native language russian also
2020-11-13 20:46
10 replies
Well I can understand 0 spoken Romanian tbh
2020-11-13 20:58
1 reply
#154
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Moldova LightX
i lived in spain for 5-6 months and i learnt it very easy,a lot of words are same or very close to romanian,I lived in Almeria,beautiful place
2020-11-13 23:50
Is there any difference between Romanian and Moldovan?
2020-11-13 20:58
7 replies
#80
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Moldova LightX
accent and russian words putting in middle of conversation
2020-11-13 21:07
#81
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Slovakia xaboff
moldovan doesnt really exist tbh... its just a political nationalist name for romanian in moldova
2020-11-13 21:09
5 replies
#152
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Moldova LightX
thats right,oficial language of moldova is romanian but the people who lives there calls it moldovan and tbh if you compare romanian to "moldovan" you will see its not so close
2020-11-13 23:54
4 replies
you mean the accent. romanian from moldova sounds like a russian romanian
2020-11-14 00:15
3 replies
#166
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Moldova LightX
We use a lot of russian words combinated with romanian and times only russian,a moldovan understands perfectly a romanian but a romanian can have difficulties to understand a moldovan,is a bit complex jaja For example youtube.com/watch?v=ZlMoRyv83Uc&ab_chann.. A romanian cant understand this,only the words said in romanian but cant understand the sentence or the meaning
2020-11-14 00:48
2 replies
I mean that could be a dialect but not a language, and that is a wrong way to teach someone to speak romanian.
2020-11-14 01:06
1 reply
#173
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Moldova LightX
Oh,yeah,thats right,is not a language,is a dialect,and yes ,its the wrong way
2020-11-14 01:09
slovak 100% croatian decent polish can understand calls on maps or where people are but not conversation rusian some calls, conversation not at all
2020-11-13 20:45
7 replies
How similar are Czech and Slovak? Is it like Serbo-Croatian? Why are you able to understand Croatian at a decent level but not Polish? Wouldn't Polish be more related to Czech?
2020-11-13 20:49
6 replies
#79
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Slovakia xaboff
its less then serbo-croatian, afaik, but there´s still like 99 percent intelligibility for Slovaks listening or reading Czech and like 95 percent the other way around. and no polish isnt more related since slovaks and czechs have been part of the same country for the most part of the last 1000 years, and in our joint country from 1918-1939 and 1945-1993. also we are exposed to each others media and culture a lot (slovaks exposed to czech media etc. more so then vice versa, thats why the 99 and 95) we´re basically brothers
2020-11-13 21:06
5 replies
Thanks for info but my last question was in reference to him saying he understood Croatian decently but not Polish
2020-11-13 21:13
4 replies
#86
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Slovakia xaboff
np and im idiot who cant read polish is in fact more related as slovak, czech and polish are west slav languages, and slovenian, serbo-croatian, bulgaian (and macedonian ig) are south slav i dont know why he has it like that, for me tbh i can understand polish better, but both are quite shit. and czechs should be able to understand polish even better than slovaks, especially those who live in the east (in Silesia mainly)
2020-11-13 21:20
#90
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Slovakia xaboff
here´s a nice graph for all slavic (and baltic) languages en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Balto-Slavic_langu..
2020-11-13 21:24
2 replies
that's nice but I think would need a timeline to really comprehend the differences
2020-11-13 21:30
1 reply
#98
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Slovakia xaboff
well i cant tell you about the differences because i cant speak all of them, but to have and idea which ones are the most similar u can look at that
2020-11-13 21:31
I can understand Estonian little bit, the basic communication words are very similar since finnish and estonian are related
2020-11-13 20:45
2 replies
#172
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Belgium lil_vodka
and how about your russian neighbour?
2020-11-14 01:08
1 reply
uralic, which is the family finnish and estonian are part of, is entirely different from slavic aka russian, ukrainian
2020-11-14 09:02
I understand around 70-80% of written Dutch though I don't always get the exact meaning of the words that I recognize, in North Germanic languages I can make out a few words here and there, but rarely full sentences
2020-11-13 20:47
2 replies
Favorite part of learning German was pronunciation tbh. It comes way more naturally to me whereas English (American), Dutch and Danish go way too weird on the consonants. Even though I'm fluent in English and my German is dogshit I honestly almost have an easier time pronouncing German words. Proper English is a different story
2020-11-13 21:13
1 reply
+1 German feels like a very logical and natural language to speak
2020-11-14 10:16
#39
fnx | 
Brazil vgzz
so i speak portuguese and i can understand spanish like 90% and a little bit of french and italian
2020-11-13 20:49
I can understand a bit of the other romance languages (except Romanian), specially if the context helps. Spanish is the closest one to portuguese and the one i could hold a conversation.
2020-11-13 20:50
2 replies
romanian sounds a lot like italian
2020-11-13 21:37
#149
perk  | 
Finland eIe
I think Portuguese sounds like Spanish with Russian accent
2020-11-13 23:41
well, nothing really
2020-11-13 20:55
2 replies
What about Chinese because of Hanja?
2020-11-13 22:19
1 reply
well an alphabet doesn't allow me to understand a different language, hanja allthough it originates from chinese sounds almost nothing like chinese, the grammar is also way different
2020-11-13 23:08
Portuguese > All Latin Languages, except French, I have no idea how they can call that a Latin language, that isn't even close.
2020-11-13 20:55
#56
 | 
Russia win73ry
I’m good at understanding Ukrainian and Belarusian. I’m also pretty sure that I’d be decent at understanding Serbo-Croatian and Bulgarian languages. West Slavic languages are no-no without any preparation.
2020-11-13 20:56
spanish obviously, they understand us and we understand them
2020-11-13 20:55
I understand englendo easily cause 50% of vocabulary comes from french
2020-11-13 20:56
#61
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Hungary Shiron212
I can't understand any other language, Hungarian is very unique There are some words that came from German(ic) and Slavic languages, so I can only understand those Finnish has a similar tone, but it just sounds like gibberish and Turkish actually has some similar words as well, but that's not enough to understand it
2020-11-13 20:56
6 replies
really pretty language imo
2020-11-13 21:03
1 reply
#217
 | 
Hungary Shiron212
Cheers 🥰
2020-11-14 13:38
#153
perk  | 
Finland eIe
+1 same Hungarian sounds a bit the same but cant understand anything. I can sorta pick up some words that go back all the way to proto finnno ugric like kez - käsi, ver - veri, hal - kala etc.
2020-11-13 23:50
1 reply
#216
 | 
Hungary Shiron212
Yep
2020-11-14 13:37
What can you say about Khanty or Mansi languages? I heard Hungary language is similar to these languages.
2020-11-14 05:33
1 reply
#215
 | 
Hungary Shiron212
It's true to some extent, the numbers are similar to the Hungarian ones, but the languages themselves sound like a mix of Lithuanian and Russian to my ears I can also pick up some familiar words from the Rusyn language
2020-11-14 13:37
90% azerbaijani 70% ozbek language 50% uyghur language 50% turkmenistani language
2020-11-13 20:57
English and spanish. More spanish than english because it is more like our Portuguese. And i don't no why, but we have serious problems for undertand portuguese from Portugal. Even though we’ve been colonized by them, we can’t understand most of the things they say And english because we have lot of words that is so similar to english words. Examples: Problem = Problema Day = Dia Night = Noite Banana = Banana (lol) Pear = Pera Apparently = Aparentemente etc And if the person dedicates himself well to study English, he will have no problem with the translation. She just needs to dedicate herself, and when he finishes, he will realize that English is much easier than Portuguese
2020-11-13 20:58
can understand azeri easily nothing apart from it
2020-11-13 21:01
None (obviously), but as being fluent in english already on early age, Swedish and German have been quite easy to learn, as they are so similar, at least for me. I speak German and can understand it very well. Swedish is a different story, but it's just because we Finns don't approve our laws for forcing it in schools.
2020-11-13 21:02
i can understand some portugese but not as well as my father. he worked for a brazilian telecom company and he could have whole conversations with someone who was only talking portugese. idk how. also, I can somewhat understand french, italian, and learn it easier. 2 languages > 1 too bad im na scum and most people only know one language while literally every eu here knows two languages because 1. their own and 2. english
2020-11-13 21:02
2 replies
This obsession European have with Brits and Americans only speaking one language is ridiculous. We speak English out of necessity, not curiosity or interest. I'd very much be in favor of everyone speaking Swedish on hltv for example and I'd take back my 6 years of German lessons in a heartbeat. You're really not missing out.
2020-11-13 21:20
1 reply
we are because even if done out of necessity it is still a problem. like I don't get your point. sure you don't want to but now you know. and you should do so out of curiosity or interest, does being knowledgeable about other cultures and being able to travel the world without seeming a dork not seem like a great thing?
2020-11-14 00:51
#75
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Argentina NOJOMO
My native language is Spanish. I speak English quite fluently, i can understand 50% of what a portuguese-speaking person says. In addition, i can comprehend just a little of Italian.
2020-11-13 21:02
Spanish Italian and English........and japanese
2020-11-13 21:04
#78
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Peru devbot
A bit of portugues. At first you don't understand much, but if you relate to someone you can understand some things. Probably some words are in common, but the pronunciation may be different and that makes something more difficult to understand. It is easier for an Italian or Portuguese to understand Spanish, but someone who speaks spanish finds it more difficult to understand italian or portuguese.
2020-11-13 21:05
#89
OK | 
United States B0OMER
im polish i can understand slovakian and czech the most, sometimes it can be full sentence, sometimes 0 words, really depends, but i think i would be able to communicate with slovakian/czech people russian on the other hand its couple of words that are similar, unfortunatly not too many to understand full sentence (similar with serbian, slovenian etc)
2020-11-13 21:22
3 replies
tbh I'm not surprised no other Slavs have said they understand Polish particularly well. Your language is by far the easiest to differentiate among the Slavic languages imo. Polish is way more flowing and easy on the ears than Russian for example.
2020-11-13 21:28
2 replies
#101
OK | 
United States B0OMER
haha true, modern polish is really influenced by german and english tbh. but polish, czech, slovakian languages are western slavic, thats why we can understand many words from each other :) it really depends, some words are exactly the same, some are completely different, also it depends on context, in songs or speaking it might be harder than for example when i read a sign because even tho spelling is the same, slovaks/czechs might read some letters differently than we do
2020-11-13 21:34
As above said, it's easy to get context of slovak, a bit harder with czech. I can catch some russian words but it's harder understand whole context. Basically Belarusians and Ukrainians can catch polish pretty easy, it's because theirs languages are pretty mixed with polish and russian.
2021-03-30 21:43
#93
 | 
Denmark KalasYoP
For me: Danish = Sweden Norway Bosnian = Serbia Croatia English = Many places German = Austria, Switzerland and other small irrelevant countries close to germany.
2020-11-13 21:27
#95
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Chile gentleeH
spanish so i can understand portuguese very easily, italian maybe if it is slow
2020-11-13 21:29
i can speak hindi)))))))))
2020-11-13 21:29
2 replies
Aren't Hindi and Urdu dialects? Don't you have an easier time understanding some Hindi dialects than they have understanding each other?
2020-11-13 21:58
1 reply
#130
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Russia win73ry
Yeah, it’s basically one language - Hindustani.
2020-11-13 22:09
Every Turk understands Azerbaijani language but the way they speak feels like a "villager Turkish" to us so chances are high that a Turk will giggle after hearing Azerbaijani. Note: I'm not saying Azerbaijani is funny, it's just how it is in Turkey.
2020-11-13 21:38
2 replies
same for russian-ukrainian.for russians ukrainian sounds like super simplified russian that is spoken in countryside
2021-03-30 09:56
1 reply
Why bump 5 months old thread?
2021-03-30 17:56
I guess I'll go myself Any Swede with half a brain should be able to digest both written Danish and Norwegian. They're pretty hard to tell apart when written. Spoken Danish is a different story and it's fucking ridiculous how a people can collectively fuck up pronunciation to such a major extent. Most Norwegians and Swedes are able to hold a convo pretty easily but since Norwegian is such a small language in such a large country their dialects are sometimes a bit off. Southeastern Norwegian (roughly half their population) basically sounds like Swedish tho and I don't think any of you would be able to differentiate between the two. Danish is hard to understand but with effort from both parties I think a fairly normal conversation can be held. Give me 2-3 months in Denmark and I figure I'd understand their language almost flawlessly. I speak fluent English and studied German for 6 years so that basically spoils the other Germanic languages. Dutch is fucking weird. I read one sentence and I'm convinced it's Norwegian, then the next has me thinking it's German, and only when I think the 3rd sentence is in English do I realize it's Dutch. Icelandic I can contextualize, at least when it's written, and for some reason I think Faroese is a lot easier to read.
2020-11-13 21:40
11 replies
when you say southern norwegian you mean eastern right?
2020-11-13 21:59
2 replies
I said southeastern and meant östlandsk. I don't think "Eastern Norwegian" would do its geographical belonging justice.
2020-11-13 22:00
1 reply
my bad, thought you said southern for some reason :P
2020-11-13 22:07
it's funny seeing swedes have this take when it comes to danish pronunciation considering the fact that swedish and norwegian are the only two germanic pitch languages in the world. Non of the other germanic languages goes up and down in tone like you're almost trying to sing lol
2020-11-13 23:08
5 replies
Right I'm not talking about the pitch of their speech but their extended vowels and sometimes non-existent consonants. Swedish and Norwegian might be the only high pitch Germanic languages but I don't see any Germans or Englishmen suddenly forgetting how to pronounce D.
2020-11-13 23:22
4 replies
that's the ironic part the pitchy up and down language that swedish and norwegian people speak stands out way more in the germanic language tree, you are unironically the odd one out. The soft D in the danish language is used both in german and english as well much like the pronounciation of "the"
2020-11-13 23:55
3 replies
When is a soft D used in English and German?
2020-11-14 11:48
2 replies
i said the pronounciation of a soft D is used very much in both of these languages just like the sound of "the". The fact that letters arent pronounced the same way is usual, i mean the swedish J sounds much more like the english Y and vice verca
2020-11-14 12:07
1 reply
I know, and I asked when it's in use. Google has no answers and from my german knowledge I can pretty confidently say their Ds are the opposite of soft. Say "hund" in German and you'll hear just about the hardest D ever.
2020-11-14 12:17
Southern Swedes understand the goblin language that is Danish. You just gotta swap out some words and drink 7 tuborg guld.
2020-11-14 05:53
1 reply
"Southern [BOLD]Swedes[/BOLD]"
2020-11-14 11:46
#110
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Finland Eestu
As a Finn I can understand some stuff in Estonian and obviously Swedish since we learn it at school and some stuff from Norwegian and Danish as well. I'm also learning Greek, which has taught me new words. And just starting on Latin, Hebrew and Arabic, but I'm just starting with them and I'm pretty new to those languages.
2020-11-13 21:41
8 replies
You find Greek hard? Easily the most beautiful language in the world
2020-11-13 21:43
7 replies
#114
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Finland Eestu
At first it was really hard for me since I've not learned a language like that before and of course there's the different script that I had to learn as well. After I learned those and some basics it started going quite well. I'm also just learning it on my own, so I just go easy and try to study it when I feel like it. But compared to Hebrew and Arabic it seems a lot easier.
2020-11-13 21:48
4 replies
btw doesn't eestu mean estonian?
2020-11-13 22:03
3 replies
#131
 | 
Finland Eestu
I think you mean Eesti? I also think that means the country itself not an Estonian, but I could be wrong about that :D
2020-11-13 22:14
2 replies
ok :D
2020-11-13 22:15
you are correct:)
2020-11-13 23:30
#115
OK | 
United States B0OMER
Italian/Spanish beautifuler
2020-11-13 21:48
1 reply
French and Italian are the prettiest of the Romance languages
2020-11-13 21:59
Yes i had some friends from czechia and we could talk each in their native language and still understand some things. Although ive heard that poles would have harder times to udnerstand other languages from slavic family when czechs slovaks etc. Understand more from polish. Ukrainian is ez for polaks to understand. How about nordic languages. I always thought that germanic langages have some similar words maybe. Friberg played in heroic after all.
2020-11-13 22:05
4 replies
Any regional differences in Polish and Ukrainian? I would guess disputed areas (e.g. Lviv) are a blend between Polish and Ukrainian but the difference between Donbass (Russian?) and Wroclaw are more identifiable? I explained the Nordic languages in #109
2020-11-13 22:15
3 replies
Ukrainian is pretty much a mixture of polish and russian and there's some differences in polish language (kashubian, silesian). In ukrainian tbf I think it depends on how many russians live in the area for example russian is more likely to be spoken in donbass than straight ukrainian.
2020-11-13 23:18
1 reply
Ukrainian is NOT a mixture of Polish and Russian.
2020-11-13 23:47
Local languages in Poland are almost forgotten. Well i have never lived in the country side or small village so i never witnessed different variations of polish language. I currently live in Wroclaw and there is mo difference in how people talk. In Poznan city they have some typical words they use to call potatoes for example but these are small differences. Jn the north of Poland people have tendency to say "yo" after saying a sentence to get a confirmation from the second speaker or something i dont really understand that. Similar to when you say "blabla, isnt it/ right?" in english. About ukrainian its completely different language but i worked with ukrainians that lived in very east of ukraine and they were raised in russian. Formal language there is ukrainian but nobody speaks that. So having russian origins i would say i had some troubles understanding what they were saying between themselves only from context. About #151 Yes ukrainian is a mixture of rusian and polish guy has no idea or smth.
2020-11-14 12:46
as a German speaker Dutch is probably the closest language, it's not hard to get the meaning of a Dutch sentence in its written form but also understanding the context of a conversation between two Dutch people is not too difficult, especially if you speak any form of Low German or other dialect yourself (i'm not a linguist but Dutch always appeared to me as just another German dialect which took on a life of its own over the centuries). also when playing with Scandinavian mates i realized that there's quite a few similarities in words between German and Danish/Swedish/Norwegian. it's not possible to hold a fluent conversation with them when everyone speaks their native language because grammar and stuff is too different but there's a few key words which sometimes make it possible to grasp some context.
2020-11-13 23:21
#146
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Hong Kong shmilx
I can read some Dutch, German, and French because of English, but to extremely limited extents (other than French which I can speak a bit of). I haven't used any Sino language in a long time, but I can understand some Mandarin because it was taught in school. Obviously I know English loan words in languages that use a lot of them like Japanese, Korean, and Cantonese but wouldn't be able to read them in their respective scripts.
2020-11-13 23:31
2 replies
#184
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Russia win73ry
Wow, I thought all the Hongkongers speak Mandarin fluently. Is it only you who can only “understand some”, or most of the population are also like that?
2020-11-14 05:56
1 reply
#218
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Hong Kong shmilx
Most Hong Kongers speak Mandarin very well despite the native language being Cantonese which aren't mutually intelligible in speech. A lot of Hong Kongers don't like speaking Mandarin though, I just haven't used it in well over 9 or 10 years because I can just speak English instead so I've forgotton so much vocabulary. I can still introduce myself and family, understand and ask basic questions and shit like that but ask me 10 years ago and I'd be confident enough to speak it and listen to it with very little problem.
2020-11-14 15:37
As a slovak, I understand 99% of Czech Maybe like 60% of polish 5-10% of russian? Probably same with Serbian, Croatian, etc. Might understand more ukrainian tho
2020-11-13 23:39
Swedish & Norwegian is easy, Faroese, Icelandic is harder. From more understandable to less. Also reading is waaay easier than listening.
2020-11-13 23:46
They say German is easy to understand if ur Dutch but Except some simple sentences i don’t understand shit Like any other language
2020-11-13 23:51
Galician, Castilian, Catalan, Italian. Other than that it becomes very hard to get anything without studying.
2020-11-13 23:56
#158
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Lithuania picoloco
I can understand some latvian words or even sentences. Since i know a bit of russian so i can understand ukrainian, russian, belarusian ( there are some different type of words ). Balkan languages has some similar russian words which are same. I can also understand some of the polish words. But since we are talking about native language so latvian are similar to lithuanian.
2020-11-14 00:07
I speak Indonesian so I can understand most Malayan dialects because Indonesian is a direct derivate from Malayan. For English though, our language is waaaay different than English so it takes extra effort to learn English.
2020-11-14 00:12
#163
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Spain Scar98
Portuguese and italian are ez to understand, same with regional languages in Spain (excluding basque)
2020-11-14 00:19
English and some programming languages
2020-11-14 00:20
Native dutch speaker, and I’d say Dutch is the perfect bridge between English and German so I don’t really have a problem with understanding any of those. However my English speaking skills are a bit better than German. I still can speak a fair bit of German as well though. Scandinavian languages like Danish, Norwegian and Swedish are on another level imo although sometimes I do recognise certain words..
2020-11-14 00:28
#168
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Greece Ploutonas
Greek i cant understand any other language BUT there are greek words in almost EVERY language
2020-11-14 00:52
Well, we have our own weird dialect of German here in Switzerland, at least in most places. There are no difficulties with German barring the pronounciation. It's funny though, not all German people seem to be able to follow spoken conversations in Swissgerman, though I suppose reading it wouldn't be such a tall order. I can speak English fairly well, my French on the other hand isn't so great... what can I say, I didn't enjoy learning the language nearly as much as I did with English. I can read some Dutch like most native speakers of Germanic languages. Understanding it is probably impossible without any practice for me, I find it very difficult to understand people speaking any language when their pronounciation isn't 100% clear, it has always been like that. With great effort I can probably extract some information out of Italian. While watching anime I tend to pick up some Japanese phrases, but one could hardly call that understanding it. I do plan on learning it, though. And lastly, in very rare instances I can recognize some words pertaining to Scandinavian languages, but even that's a bit of a stretch.
2020-11-14 01:12
#175
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Belgium lil_vodka
For me: Dutch= german conversations arent that hard to understand English = bloody brits & burgers Russian = here and there i understand some polish French = spanish basic sentences
2020-11-14 01:16
I speak and write in 4 languages fluently. But then again, it's not that rare where I live, since there are 21 major languages in the country :D, and over 1500 dialects.
2020-11-14 05:41
Like none, i guess estonian But i also speak like 4 other languages that are not connected to Finnish
2020-11-14 05:44
2 replies
#185
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Russia win73ry
What are the other languages?
2020-11-14 08:35
1 reply
Swedish, english,german, finnish are the languages im fluent in. Have an okay understanding of russian, Estonian, Norwegian,danish.
2020-11-14 11:43
With English alone when I went to Germany I was able to read or assume most sentences for basic understanding also when I learned Spanish many words sound similar
2020-11-14 05:49
I understand like...70% of spanish (written or spoken whataver), 50% italian, 40% romanian (written , spoken 5%) 40% french (written, spoken is like 10%)
2020-11-14 05:53
#183
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Mexico evm
I can perfectly understand written Portuguese but struggle when it's spoken. I'm fluent in English and I took 2 semesters of French. Italian I can maybe pick up on some things.
2020-11-14 05:56
Can: russian german english Learning: chinese Understand some ukrainian, minimal serbian, maybe even polish. I understand swisss german a bit same for bavarian dialect.
2020-11-14 08:50
#187
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Serbia TheSerb
We can understand Croatian,bosnian,macedonian,slovenian perfectly. We understand a bit of Bulgarian, ukrainan, russian
2020-11-14 08:54
1 reply
#188
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Cambodia RIPol_Pot
the bestest bratan mens))))))))))))))
2020-11-14 08:55
#190
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Georgia Megobari
I know russian, georgian and english. I can understand Ukrainian, Czech, Polish and some slavic languages.
2020-11-14 09:03
With my Swiss German I can understand Germans and Austrians pretty easy. In the other way people are very limited in understanding Swiss German. My experience until now. French is used in France, Canada, some african countries. I dunno, it's not my native language, but I understand pretty much. I can speak: German, Swiss German, French, English more or less I know swearwords: Albanian, Turkish, Serbian, Russian, Polish, Spanish, Italian, Croatian, German, Swiss German, French
2020-11-14 09:08
Knowing the Murego-Gubden dialect of the Dargin language, I can understand 5 other dialects of Dargin language. Knowing Russian, I can easily understand Ukrainian, Belarusian and Rusyn, a bit worse Serbian, Croatian, Montenegrin, Bosnian and Polish. Czech is impossible to understand for a Russian speaker. Knowing Danish, I can understand Norwegian (bokmål), Swedish, a little bit of German
2020-11-14 09:13
My mother tongue is tamil and it was fairly easy to pick up kannada and telugu though there's some other factors too. (like it's still little hard to converse in it fluently but I can understand it to a decent enough level)
2020-11-14 09:26
i speak english portuguese spanish russian lauguage and some german
2020-11-14 09:28
My native language is kazakh, I can understand some turkic languages like nogai, kyrgyz, bashkir.
2020-11-14 09:30
2 replies
Dont you understand some Uzbek too? Btw I can understand 20%-25% of Kazakh when I read a Kazakh text. I think it is probably same for you if you read a Turkish text.
2020-11-14 11:50
1 reply
Yeah, I understand some Uzbek and Turkish, but these are harder to understand than Nogai, kyrgyz, bashkir, etc.
2020-11-16 11:51
#198
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Ukraine IAFNN
my native is ukrainian so i can understand russian, byelorussian clearly, polish and czech a little bit
2020-11-14 10:27
#199
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Russia derlegend
I can understand slovak, a little polish, and ukrainian with belarusian
2020-11-14 10:33
#200
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Russia dyatl0v
I would like to commend to y'all and especially people who speak slavic lang check the "Ecolinguist" channel on YT. Just to realise how similar the slavic languages, and how close mentally (in the speaking way) we are <3
2020-11-14 10:36
#201
rain | 
Czech Republic Guczy
Czech Slovak Russia Maybe few things in Polish English
2020-11-14 10:40
I can understand Slovak Czech Russian Silesian Kaszebe and also a bit of Croatian. Its funny because in most cases i know what they are talking about but I cant really respond :D
2020-11-14 10:43
czech language and slovakian are very similiar we can have convo 24/7 and ez we used to be the same country right, with polish idk some czech ppl say they can talk with each other IDk if i am retarded or what its just not possible at all, yes I can understand some words even some sentences if lucky but a fluent conversation is just not possible for me at all other languages serbian or russian ukrainian also not possible at all, sometimes just catch some word if lucky a sentence but thats it
2020-11-14 11:47
2 replies
true, same to me, but reverse. better with eastern slavic and barelly with western, like i can understand some words and even phrases from time to time, but will never understand whole speech
2021-03-30 18:11
1 reply
hehe old thread :D, but yeah I understand you true
2021-03-30 18:15
German, so i can understand a bit Dutch
2020-11-14 12:13
#213
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Denmark _Caesar_
Chinese, can barely understand other dialects lmao
2020-11-14 12:52
German, some Dutch, some words and context from scandinavian languages
2020-11-14 12:52
IDK i have spent too much time on all the nordic languages to know how much i actually knew at the start i know faroese swedish danish no problem icelandic is harder for me but i still understand a lot ::dd especially in writing
2020-11-15 13:13
Well I can understand like up to 40-45% of Czech and Slovak, Ukrainian and Belarussian a bit less but still quite undestandable, up to 30-35% . From Russian I can just pick up random words here and there, maybe like 15-20% and Balkan languages are the hardest, especially Bulgarian and Slovenian, I understand up to 5-10% of them spoken.
2020-11-15 20:34
Norwegian, Danish and a little bit of Icelandic and Faroese. German can also be understood quite a bit, but not nearly as much. Some words are very similar and some sentences you can actually figure out exactly what they mean without any translator. Norwegian is the most similar, i can have fluent conversation with norwegian in my own languages. Danish wouldn’t have been so hard if they didn’t speak like they just came home from mouth operation. And no i don’t have any form of education on nordic languages other than my own.
2021-03-30 10:13
#224
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Czech Republic Luck9nN
Slovak Polish Some balkan languages - serbian for example (at least most of the things) I mean any slavic language is understandable when the person is talking slow. If I didnt know russian I guess its the hardest one, since there are so many words that are very different from the rest
2021-03-30 10:12
1 reply
#225
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Czech Republic Luck9nN
Its also weird but I guess I understand reasonable amount of german since there are so many german words in the czech vocabulary
2021-03-30 10:15
Ukranian and Belarusian -90 % Bulgarian - 60% Slovak - 55%(suprisingly much better tham )czech Polish - 45% (It is hard when they talk, muuch easier when it is text) chezch - 40% (Too much from German i guess) Also i do always recognize a lot of words and the main topic of the conversation in all Balcan languages These percents are rather relative, their goal is just to compare how much of a languagei understand compared with others, not amount of data i understand.
2021-03-30 10:19
2 replies
not sure if this true, russian, belorusian and ukrainian are quite different
2021-03-30 18:07
1 reply
Not at all actually, especially because even many rural Belarussians and Ukranians do use a lot of russian words , it is not pure foreign language.
2021-03-30 20:07
#227
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Latvia Dirsi))
As a native Latvian speaker, I can understand some Lithuanian and Latgalian (if you can count Latgalian as a language)
2021-03-30 10:23
A good friend of mine can speak catalan spanish italien english and german
2021-03-30 17:48
will understand like 60-70% of serbian and bulgarian, 40-50% of belorusian and ukrainian, 20-30 polish and other west slavic languages if they speak slowly. there's youtube show by a polish guy where he invite 3 slavs from different countries and each trying to explain a word in their language and others trying to guess. it has english subs if someone interested
2021-03-30 18:05
It depends, if you know 1 germanic, romance, and slavic language you will understand most europeans (except maybe albanians, finns, greeks or hungarians)
2021-03-30 18:19
I can understand Bilorusian quite good, Polish much worse, hardly in fact. Similar with Slovakian, Czeh, Croatian, Serbian - all very bad only Slovakian a bit bit better. As to moscovite to my huge pity I can understnad it but not cause it`s closer to Ukrainian than real Slavic languages I mentioned before but due to politic of massive moscovization of Ukraine by moscovite occupants in past and opressions of everything Ukrainian, genocide, deportations, politic of assimilation etc.
2021-03-30 21:29
I would say I could understand a good portion of Faroese, which is basically 50% Danish and 50% Icelandic imo. Tiny bit of Norwegian but to be honest it takes Icelandic people 2-3 months to learn Norwegian with a good amount of effort, such an easy language
2021-03-30 21:50
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