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muscle memory
 | 
Japan nostalgiabruh 
Can playing a different game like sekiro shadows die twice on a different sens than in cs actually mess up my muscle memory?
2021-04-22 18:49
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no
2021-04-22 18:50
1 reply
ok thanks for the answer /closed
2021-04-22 18:50
#6
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Peru devbot
I play with different sens dpi CS and I don't notice a big difference, your memory adapts quickly to change
2021-04-22 18:54
1 reply
Thanks for the answer bro
2021-04-22 19:52
muscle memory does not work like that, muscle memory is more short term than a thing that builds up over time
2021-04-22 18:55
11 replies
muscle memory is all about long term.. Thats why you get better in CS over a time instead instant global in a week
2021-04-22 19:40
10 replies
getting better at cs has nothing to do with muscle memory
2021-04-22 19:43
9 replies
nice to see that you dont know what are you talking about x)
2021-04-22 19:44
8 replies
there's more to cs than raw aim
2021-04-22 19:50
1 reply
yes, like movement for example which is done unconsciously, but if you remember first time you played on PC, you had to take a look everytime you wanted to go right, forward or left. Then its about switching to grenades, because without muscle memory you have to again take a look. Then there are certain situation which you react unconsciously, you see enemy, you press mouse1 But yeah, tell me more i am really curious
2021-04-22 20:00
aim is only a small part of getting good at cs As an inevitable result of the frequent discussion of this topic some rather harmful misconceptions arise, such as the idea that you have to stay on one sensitivity or you will lose/significantly-damage your ability to aim. A large part of the reason why people believe they have to keep their sensitivity the same is due to the familiarity they have with it. While playing on a given sensitivity you gain a general sense of the relationship between the motion of your mouse and your view in-game. These aspects result in the sensitivity becoming more comfortable to use as you are never surprised by the results of your input and the extent to which you need to utilize parts of your arm. As a result people will then tend to get scared off by changing their sensitivity as they lose the familiarity it has to them, which is compounded by having to adapt to performing various types of motions with parts of their arm they aren’t used to. It is important to understand however that much like any other aspect of aim, you can develop and refine your ability to adapt to a new sensitivity. There is also an irrefutable wealth of anecdotal evidence within the aim training community of players changing their sensitivity constantly, even using sensitivity randomizers, all without a noticeable long term penalty to their aim. There is even a clip where one of the best LG duelers, Serious, switches to extremely fast sensitivities (3cm for instance) and still beats Zexrow. It is even often suggested to try changing your sensitivity to overcome plateaus in improvement as a new sensitivity can give you a fresh starting point to improve from. Some may argue that holding an angle in the same position at the same level and tightness in tactical-shooters like Counter Strike or Valorant, may be more related to memory, but even in these instances there is plenty of variance, especially in both auditory and visual reaction time. That alone shows that sticking to the same sensitivity isn’t a strong enough factor. Sure there are benefits and downsides to using a certain sensitivity, but most of it is related to comfort .
2021-04-22 20:00
5 replies
nice copypasta.. You have still no clue what you are talking about, same as a dude you copied that from.
2021-04-22 22:10
4 replies
read it before saying it's copypasta?
2021-04-23 13:40
3 replies
Yes, inagree its good for training, but dont agree that muscle memory is short term thing. Its basically everything you do is about muscle memory. Thats why you dont have to focus on aiming that much as you used to like a kid. Thats why you dont have to look on keyboard when you want to write anything. Thats why you need around on week to be in almost same shape as you have been before 1 year break.
2021-04-23 14:03
2 replies
Thats why you dont have to focus on aiming that much as you used to like a kid. Aiming consists mainly of hand-eye coordination and mouse control. Muscle memory does have an effect, but it is not substantial because your energy levels, mood, overall health and mousepad surface changing due to oils from skin and dust are a factor. Thats why you dont have to look on keyboard when you want to write anything. Go to aim_botz, observe your screen and close your eyes. Now it's kinda unrealistic to expect you to hit any of the targets, but even the best aimers who claim they have close to perfect muscle memore won't be able to hit the targets. Thats why you need around on week to be in almost same shape as you have been before 1 year break. What is this based on? I, and most of the people I know get back in shape after a good warmup and a few pug games.
2021-04-23 14:42
popsci.com/what-is-muscle-memory/ read this for more info
2021-04-23 14:50
#8
vsm | 
Denmark Gryde
not in a meaningful way
2021-04-22 18:55
#9
f0rest | 
Ukraine lo0u
No. Muscle memory doesn't really work like that. While it's pretty much a fact it exists, it doesn't affect your mouse control that much. You can certainty adapt to different sensitivities and different games, if you know how to aim with your wrist, fingers and arm.
2021-04-22 18:57
yes u will go from gn2 to gn3 in now time
2021-04-22 18:58
#11
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Poland FitPolak
Can bulgarian split squat mess up my squat? Not really B)
2021-04-22 18:58
2 replies
does it help though?
2021-04-22 19:46
1 reply
#43
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Poland FitPolak
It does, because you perform similar movement pattern B)
2021-04-22 21:53
no, ive played other games instead of csgo for a while and my muscle memory never changed
2021-04-22 18:59
just for about 5 minutes so warm up abit when u play lowsense in other game and highsense in cs
2021-04-22 19:49
#19
nafany | 
Sweden hoey
why would you play sekiro with mouse and keyboard
2021-04-22 19:49
4 replies
im poor men( no controller
2021-04-22 19:53
3 replies
#28
nafany | 
Sweden hoey
but to answer your question yes short term it might change your muscle memory, but after a few days of only playing csgo again you will be back to normal
2021-04-22 19:55
1 reply
but if i play sekiro like 4 hours a day and 2 hours of cs every day for a week lets say and then after this week go back to only cs will i notice any difference or will i be fine?
2021-04-22 19:58
buy a cheap controller. these games aren't meant to be played on mouse+keyboard.
2021-04-22 19:56
no
2021-04-22 19:50
data from those who have studied this: if you play another game for a long time, your muscle memory will start to develop in that game, but you will never forget the way you played cs, in just a week playing / training cs your memory muscle will return by 90% and after 1 month 100%
2021-04-22 19:51
2 replies
ok so if i play sekiro for lets say every day 4 hours and then a few hours cs for a week then go back to cs only will i notice no diffrence?
2021-04-22 19:54
1 reply
yes, your body can memorize various types of movements :) it just needs to remind you not to forget
2021-04-22 20:11
you must play cs go 24/7, because real life will make you lose your muscle memory.
2021-04-22 19:55
1 reply
lmao XD
2021-04-22 19:57
Idk but just in case it's true uninstall pls))
2021-04-22 19:57
3 replies
( i need to be pro in cs men(
2021-04-22 20:00
2 replies
I was not referring to cs tho
2021-04-22 20:02
1 reply
oh ok men
2021-04-22 20:04
no you can play csgo on a different equivalent sensitivity as what you play r6 siege etc and they will never mess each other up
2021-04-22 20:11
I use sensitivity calculators to have same sens in all games.
2021-04-22 22:52
#47
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Netherlands xAlpaka
I use a different sens in every game cuz of playsyles and have no problem adapting to that quickly
2021-04-23 13:42
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