Thread has been deleted
Last comment
IT language
 | 
Ukraine OBJECTIVE_FAN_OF_NAVI 
I like studying something new, and I ve always heard about IT, Python, Java, however I have almost 0 clue about it. I don't have a goal of it becoming my full time job, but rather a secondary skill that may come in handy in the future. So I would like to ask hltv mens)) where can I study at least some basics about Python/Java I am thankful for any kind of response
2021-06-13 13:37
Topics are hidden when running Sport mode.
in 10th grade of school
2021-06-13 13:38
23 replies
okay, unfortunately, I am in 9th, and we ve been studying some old programmes
2021-06-13 13:39
18 replies
really? wtf atleast in lithuania they teach basics of c++ and python in 10th grade, 11th grade, 12th
2021-06-13 13:39
11 replies
well it is from my perspective. I am from a small town, so perhaps it is not that popular in my town. lack of specialists. It was lazarus that I remember the most
2021-06-13 13:42
6 replies
i thought eastern europe full of it specialists kek
2021-06-13 13:40
5 replies
or I was not paying enough attention.
2021-06-13 13:41
4 replies
i'm pretty sure u can google: learn python + your town name and then will have output how and where also check websites: UDEMY, W3SCHOOLS i think udemy not free tho
2021-06-13 13:43
3 replies
Thank you, henry)
2021-06-13 13:44
2 replies
who
2021-06-13 13:44
thats where you are ahead of the curve. ^Most countrys don't have programing in is obligatory curriculum. I only learned it in UNi bcuz i took an interest, all they teach in it classes is excel and basic knowledge of windows office.
2021-06-13 14:01
#39
nitr0 | 
United States Zake_
Dam, high schools that teach applicable information, couldnt be us. Have to wait until uni for that
2021-06-13 14:17
1 reply
we also learn about taxes and shit as i heard from tiktok, USA students dont KEK
2021-06-13 14:21
#90
 | 
Europe Amamiya
Wat, they dont even know what it is here.
2021-06-16 07:54
Flair checks out
2021-06-13 13:39
5 replies
More like flag, I am ukrainian, and I like Navi
2021-06-13 13:40
4 replies
wait,do you guys actually have IT lessons in school?
2021-06-13 13:43
3 replies
it is called Informatika, it was since elementary school, but most of our time we spent playing CS, playing basic games that are made for 6-7 year olds, even when we were 10. We just had a little course about Lazarus and Scratch
2021-06-13 13:44
2 replies
I had informatika as well in 7-8th grade. all i was doing was playing agar.io type of shit games.
2021-06-13 13:45
1 reply
we were doing basically the same, but then we had Lazarus and it was the best in the whole Computer Studies
2021-06-13 13:46
We're learning PascalABC from 7th to 11th grade, in 10-11 also HTML/CSS
2021-06-13 14:08
3 replies
hahah wht is pascalabc so cringe here c++ python do you even need to learn html css its so ez
2021-06-13 14:20
2 replies
#47
 | 
Bulgaria Kradeca_
bro our computers are at least 10years old, mine is some piece of crap laptop from 2006. We have IT from 5th grade now im 11th grade and we're still learning excel, powerpoint and word :D. Its so bad my computer is restarting itself.
2021-06-13 14:28
I'm asking yourself same question Probably because of 55-65 yo unmotivated IT teachers and old computers Tho I disagree with html/css so ez, it's actually not that easy if you try to make your site look good at all common resolutions
2021-06-13 14:46
Computer language*
2021-06-13 13:38
switch to arch linux to instantly become a god tier developer
2021-06-13 13:39
2 replies
+1 i switched to archlinux like real script kiddie
2021-06-13 14:49
1 reply
I switched to manjaro because I'm noob and now I feel like an elite hacker when I type neofetch in console
2021-06-16 20:52
#11
 | 
Czech Republic forseti12
freeCodeCamp.org on youtube has a lot of free courses
2021-06-13 13:41
1 reply
Thanks
2021-06-13 13:43
Pluarsight, codeacademy, linkedin learning, YouTube, learnjavaonline, coursera, udemy are just a few places you can learn them.
2021-06-13 13:41
7 replies
wow, that's a lot of sources I can find info. Thank you very much
2021-06-13 13:42
linkedin is shit
2021-06-13 14:47
2 replies
Linked learning isn’t that bad. Do I think pluralsight is better? Absolutely.
2021-06-13 15:30
1 reply
linkedin had a data breach so fuck them
2021-06-13 15:47
U forgot stack overflow
2021-06-13 15:36
2 replies
Stackoverflow is more about problem solving, not learning the basics. Unless they’ve released their own courses that I’m not aware of.
2021-06-13 15:40
1 reply
true, but nonetheless still saves your ass sometimes.
2021-06-14 11:50
take a course from something like udemy
2021-06-13 13:42
2 replies
I will look into it, Thanks for help
2021-06-13 13:42
1 reply
Use packt instead, its cheaper. you can get like 100 Python, Java, C, C+, Swift etc.. course for just $10, but on Udemy, you have to pay $15 for just one course.
2021-06-13 14:19
#20
 | 
Poland Hanse
There is not much about IT that can be "secondary skill", either you commit and know a lot or do nothing with it, especially with programming languages you listed
2021-06-13 13:44
8 replies
well I guess in the future almost every job will require some knowledge about IT
2021-06-13 13:45
why not? learning a scripting language like python or js might be helpful even if you don't have a job in IT. it may help you to automatize things and let the computer do repetitive and boring tasks for you edit: ok i agree with you about java tho. there's no real point in learning java unless you go for a career in software dev
2021-06-13 14:12
6 replies
#37
 | 
Poland Hanse
Writing even simple scripts in python that have any real function is not easy nor quick for beginner, instead of learning language for long months just "because it may come in handy once... one day" just buy "Automate the Boring Stuff with Python" and check it when you need to actually use it
2021-06-13 14:15
4 replies
he said he likes studying new things and he's still a student so i guess he has lots of free time. what's the harm in putting 1 hour/day into learning something that will for sure come in handy in the future? also i doubt you'd find your specific use case in that book. it will give you some general insight about python structures and how you should tackle the problem, but you still need a somehow trained analytical mind to be able to split your 'big problem' in smaller, solvable tasks, for which you need exercise.
2021-06-13 14:29
3 replies
Putting up with people who have learned to code (as opposed to studied programming) at work is a headache. SODD.
2021-06-13 14:35
2 replies
maybe, but neither me or OP was talking about getting a job in IT.
2021-06-13 14:44
1 reply
I think you midunderstood me. I am talking about the type you have described, i.e. people who did not study the subject in a methodical way, instead completed a few personal projects. They will end up with gaping holes in their understanding.
2021-06-13 17:41
#91
 | 
Europe Amamiya
A time saver so you can actually tell your boss you've got an hour of work to do but in fact you just press a button.
2021-06-16 07:56
w3schools and someting like udemy are good.
2021-06-13 13:44
2 replies
Thank you, lots of sites or videos I can find info or guides
2021-06-13 13:45
1 reply
2021-06-13 13:59
codewars.com Python and other languages automatetheboringstuff.com/2e/chapter0/ Python only
2021-06-13 14:06
3 replies
I would add Codility and HackerRank. Especially the latter, as it has more focus on algorithms and data structures.
2021-06-13 14:21
thanks
2021-06-13 14:27
1 reply
2021-06-13 14:29
Can you ruski?
2021-06-13 14:01
7 replies
Yes
2021-06-13 14:29
6 replies
Im currently coming trough univesity course of basic python and this course seems good to me. youtube.com/playlist?list=PLRDzFCPr95fID.. On this channel you can find different series of videos about various topics such as data analasys, python basics, c++ courses etc... This guy explains not only what does what but why does it does it and why it does it this way. Sorry for my english. Overall there are many different courses that you can find on youtube. Do not even try these fancy promoted courses for example GeekBrains. Waste of time.
2021-06-13 14:42
2 replies
Appreciate it,thanks once again
2021-06-13 14:42
1 reply
Youre welcome
2021-06-13 14:43
And, no I am not fakeflagging, I can 5 languages
2021-06-13 14:42
2 replies
#93
 | 
France KryZoreus
except english I see
2021-06-16 08:09
1 reply
Baguette talking Rrrrrrr
2021-06-16 20:23
w3schools.com/ Best website to learn a new coding language
2021-06-13 13:59
Try this: docs.python.org/3/tutorial/ I can recommend books, too. I can help you out with setting up your environment.
2021-06-13 14:04
2021-06-13 14:05
f"Youtube. You can find good beginner stuff from people like PyLenin, or some complete college {langauge} course."
2021-06-13 14:17
1 reply
Thanks
2021-06-13 14:31
#44
 | 
Ukraine Najara
Python ez to learn and ez to start read about syntax Try to create some projects Java is complex on high level so I don't recommend it for beginner You can use youtube "Python crash course", "How to create games on Python", "How to create WebApp on Python" etc
2021-06-13 14:25
3 replies
ty
2021-06-13 14:25
How exactly is Java "complex"? I've done a lot of programming languages and Java is one of the clearest environment there are.
2021-06-13 15:46
1 reply
#72
 | 
Ukraine Najara
syntax yes frameworks - .........
2021-06-13 17:23
#61
 | 
Europe msfalif404
That's a good step for you because in the future all work cannot be separated from IT. In the beginning you must know where you wanna go, whether desktop programming, website programming, game programming or mobile programming. My suggestion you can start from web programming because you can see what you have done before, I mean if you choose desktop programming at first you can only see black screen with some output, but it will make your logic strong. While, choosing website programming you can see the "real" progress. Okay, I'm assuming you opted for website programming. At first you can learn HTML which is how websites can display text, images or videos. Then, you can learn CSS which is useful for designing your website like adding colors, creating navigation bars, footers, etc. After that, you have to know the difference between Front End and Back End, in simple terms the front end is the task of handling the web appearance like its design, while the back end is the task of handling the process of sending data, for example you register on the website and click the register button, then the data that you input earlier will be in the database and that's the work of the back end. Once you know the difference between Front End or Back End you can learn Javascript or PHP but most importantly you should know Javascript is very important no matter you are Front End or Back End. After learning those two things, you can learn MySQL which is like controlling huge data in database. Once you learn the 5 basics (HTML, CSS, Javascript, PHP, MySQL) you can learn the framework, which makes programming easier for you. You can learn from Laravel if you have prior PHP knowledge or you can learn React JS if you have prior Javascript knowledge. If you like reading, you can go to W3Schools to learn what I've told you before, you can also visit blogs like medium.com and look for programming articles. But, if you like watching videos, I have some youtube channels which have great videos for you. You can take notes: The Net Ninja, Programming With Mosh, Freecodecamp (recommend this if you wanna learn Python or Java), Traversymedia, and many more. Sorry for my bad english
2021-06-13 14:51
1 reply
That's a lot of useful info. Thanks
2021-06-13 16:02
stepik
2021-06-13 15:30
#64
 | 
Belgium lil_vodka
w3resource could help you progress
2021-06-13 15:33
go rutracker mens)) many tutorials there
2021-06-13 15:43
1 reply
+1
2021-06-13 15:52
check out Youtube channels like Sebastian Lague, CodeParade and Ben Eater, they don't teach anything per se, but watching them you learn a lot of interresting stuff about how coding / computers work
2021-06-13 17:45
1 reply
thanks
2021-06-13 18:43
Saying IT and learning programming languages is weird. IT doesn't need programming for most of the things, so unless you actually commit to it, and learn programming AS WELL, I really can't see any benefit for that......it's also so specific that I really don't see how this secondary skill would help you, with nearly anything.
2021-06-13 17:49
You can learn a ton of java here: w3schools.com/java/ It's amazing website, but Java is pretty damn hard and complicated (hate it myself), I wouldn't recommend it if you have 0 experience tbh.
2021-06-14 11:53
4 replies
wut? java is really pretty easy to learn....and a great first language to learn as it gives you a good balance between OOP and procedural programming, then you can go either direction easily, whether it's c++ or scripting languages like python or js.
2021-06-14 12:14
3 replies
For some ppl it's easy yes, probably that's why we started with java in high school. But for me it was hard & terrible (note: i don't like programming at all - maybe that's why) But it's complicated (even professors admitted that C++ makes more sense mostly)
2021-06-14 13:56
2 replies
If you say java is hard, then c++ is facing gambit as a tier10 team. I can also find a professor that believes the earth is flat, it really isn't saying anything. And it doesn't really makes more sense to start with c++. Not impossible, not bad, but I surely don't think it's more logical.
2021-06-14 14:30
1 reply
Lol then idk, mabye thats why I regret learning basics of programming lmao
2021-06-16 07:52
As someone who has worked at many Global IT firms, I can share a few views. To understand computer science, you need some fundamental 3rd-generation languages. Starting with Python will *not* help you understand the underlying implementations. There's a reason why even MIT Majors in CS101 will start with C-Language programming. Python is like using an advanced tool to begin, which is not a good idea, since you need to work with legacy code in the future, which is almost always in Java. So, this is my recommendation - start with C++/Java, then move on to Python. Trust me, that is the right way to go about it. After doing this, you can move on to specific frameworks, as and when needed. I have learned those languages using some global standard books, so I wouldn't be able to recommend online courses for the same, unfortunately :(
2021-06-14 12:04
2 replies
Thank you
2021-06-14 12:12
Totally agree, starting with a scripting language as a first language to learn is really a bad decision in my opinion. Java feels like a perfect balance to me.
2021-06-14 12:16
2021-06-14 12:15
#85
 | 
Croatia the_zlatk0
learncpp.com
2021-06-14 12:19
You should learn C# or Java C++ and C are both hard for first language, Python is useless, JS and others web language are ok if they are your 2nd, 3rd etc language
2021-06-16 08:05
sololearn.com
2021-06-16 20:25
#96
 | 
Lebanon Dogman69
Rust or Golang
2021-06-16 20:25
Login or register to add your comment to the discussion.