Thread has been deleted
Last comment
fav programming language?
 | 
Norway thojo 
title Mine prob Python & C++
2022-03-11 12:39
Topics are hidden when running Sport mode.
#1
 | 
Australia B_Tannen
python because I used it a lot for robotics
2022-03-11 12:40
8 replies
#16
 | 
Poland msfalif404
What kind of robot do you made ?
2022-03-11 12:44
7 replies
#26
 | 
Australia B_Tannen
I’ve done some cool projects with arduino chips. Parcel sorters, light sensor alarms, range finders, metronomes, radio communicators.
2022-03-11 12:52
6 replies
#62
 | 
Poland msfalif404
Do i need to understand physics or electricity first to learn robotic ? or even i must buy some arduino to learn it ?
2022-03-11 13:20
5 replies
#90
 | 
Australia B_Tannen
You don’t need to understand physics or electricity. The chips like arduino have lots of guides online, so it’s quite easy to learn robotics with arduino or similar products.
2022-03-11 13:54
Start off by getting a duckiebot or something similar and figure out how ROS works. ROS can be quite an ass to the beginner so the duckiebot documentation has a lot of how-to's to easily get started with. They also provide you with machine learning code for image recognition which you can use and learn from. source: I graduated in AI and robotics.
2022-03-14 17:29
3 replies
May i ask a question ? Does math really used in AI / robotic things ? I just an second semester data science student
2022-03-14 17:42
2 replies
#244
 | 
Australia B_Tannen
Not this kind of stuff. But at a university level yes, because you do engineering.
2022-03-14 22:33
yeah, math and physics will be your close friends when working on either AI stuff or robotics. It is very specialized math though so you don't need to know every single theorem. But if you're not a fan of math right now you will get the hang of it the more you work. It gets a lot easier and a lot more fun when the result is an neural net that can recognize images or a robot that picks something up. I personally wasn't a huge fan of math and had a lot of issues with it as I was never great at it, but I graduated without issues and now I even started to like math.
2022-03-15 11:02
#2
 | 
Lithuania _is_best
c++
2022-03-11 12:40
3 replies
+1
2022-03-11 13:48
+1
2022-03-11 15:45
+1, Java, Python, Ruby, PhP and R. But main is Java.
2022-03-20 10:46
#3
 | 
India Jester_Bard
dart
2022-03-11 12:40
2 replies
+1, Dart is the future
2022-03-15 12:23
1 reply
Isn't dart a bit bad performance-wise though? That is if I recall some benchmark studies correctly
2022-03-15 16:48
#4
 | 
Austria Ostmark
html
2022-03-11 12:40
9 replies
#8
 | 
Lithuania _is_best
reported
2022-03-11 12:40
1 reply
#9
 | 
Austria Ostmark
no u
2022-03-11 12:41
#14
 | 
Czech Republic Ventraks
css
2022-03-11 12:42
+1 because its too ez
2022-03-11 12:48
#34
 | 
Norway thojo
html best for AI
2022-03-11 12:59
HTML is not a programming language my dude
2022-03-11 13:06
3 replies
#50
 | 
Austria Ostmark
water is wet
2022-03-11 13:08
1 reply
the sky is blue
2022-03-15 13:54
#69
rain | 
Norway Okiko
HTML + CSS on the other hand is actually Turing Complete
2022-03-11 13:36
english
2022-03-11 12:40
Goto for quick tasks are likely Python. Otherwise what suits the specific job
2022-03-11 12:41
#12
 | 
Czech Republic Ventraks
Czech
2022-03-11 12:41
1 reply
Epic
2022-03-11 19:14
python and c# <3
2022-03-11 12:43
1 reply
#178
 | 
Brazil ac_Z
I also learned the basics of Java, C++, HTML and CSS and only delved into Python and C#. Python I used in several college jobs and C# to program games through Unity Engine.
2022-03-11 19:40
#17
 | 
Poland msfalif404
python is good, but javascript is bestest.
2022-03-11 12:45
1 reply
#42
 | 
United Kingdom Fayn02
+1 javascript <333333
2022-03-11 13:04
#18
HooXi | 
Romania wadd
c++ because its clean i like javascript aswell
2022-03-11 12:46
4 replies
What do you mean C++ is clean lol...
2022-03-11 15:30
3 replies
Compared to Java, C++ is clean
2022-03-14 17:21
2 replies
Have you seen anything that's Java 14+ ? They seem to be "cleaning up". Also yes, Java is forcing everything oop into everything, not cool. python all the way reeeeeeeeeeeeee
2022-03-14 18:19
1 reply
The same could be said about C++ 17/20
2022-03-15 00:11
#22
 | 
Israel Aaron_btc
.net , csharp i hate c++, i love javascript - so versatile...
2022-03-11 12:51
Erlang/Elixir
2022-03-11 12:51
5 replies
Are you for real? What system are you dealing with for requiring something like Erland?
2022-03-11 15:34
4 replies
Currently I am working for livecasino. What exactly you wanna know?
2022-03-14 12:06
3 replies
Just not a lot of companies working with systems requiring the benefits of Erlang, I was just actually curious. A live casino makes a lot of sense
2022-03-14 17:04
2 replies
Now a days every small or big companies are bombarded with lot and lots of users and Erlang/Elixir can be really good for them.
2022-03-14 19:49
1 reply
Well there is a place for everything. I wouldn't necessarily recommend "every small or big companies" to add this to their stack though.
2022-03-14 20:54
C, I'm interested in safety critical systems. Ada and assembly must be a close second and third though I'm yet to properly learn any of them, C has so many intricacies, Ada seems interesting but I haven't started and assembly I haven't touched since my Computer Org. Class lol
2022-03-11 12:51
11 replies
#35
 | 
Norway thojo
Im really interested in learning web assembly
2022-03-11 13:00
6 replies
Doubt you'll ever need to write webassembly by hand. If anything, youll write code in a lowish level language like cpp or rust, then will use a compiler to generate the webasm
2022-03-11 13:09
5 replies
#60
 | 
Norway thojo
Not rly a web developer, I use Python for discord bots n webscrapers n random stuff, & C++ for stuff like Arduino etc. I don't really know front end development, so web assembly would be cool to learn.
2022-03-11 13:18
4 replies
yea but assembly is basically a machine level language. as long as you're not going to fine tune generated code or debug proprietary code, you'll only be writing code in a sane(r) language and compile it down to assembly
2022-03-11 13:23
3 replies
#74
 | 
Norway thojo
Yeah ik, but I heard you can create some really cool stuff with Web assembly, one example is someone ported DOOM 3 Demo to a website or something lol dont rly think it will replace javascript, but it can take some of its tasks Already have a foot inside the C++ door, so would be cool to not only try but also further develop my c++ abilities
2022-03-11 13:46
2 replies
yeah but they basically used emscripten to compile the original code into webassembly (plus some changes to the rendering/input/audio layer needed to port the game to a web browser) all the game code is still written in c/c++. webassembly knowledge isn't needed for that
2022-03-11 17:39
1 reply
#168
 | 
Norway thojo
ik, but i think its just cool & a good example of WebAssembly's use purpose i saw on the WebAssembly subreddit that someone made like a desktop, that was pretty cool
2022-03-11 18:58
if you're interested in "safety critical systems" drop that ancient C shit right now and get into Rust.
2022-03-11 13:52
3 replies
As interesting and useful as Rust may be, legacy systems are written in C, automotive systems are still programmed according to MISRA, even if Boeing / Airbus use Ada extensively, the A340's Fly by wire is in C for example.
2022-03-11 15:26
2 replies
that is a good point. but i'd still recommend rust for someone new to this low-level software area.
2022-03-11 15:29
1 reply
#175
 | 
France PaulST2
I think it's a good idea to learn C first so that you know why Rust is good when you discover Rust. Else you're never gonna understand why Rust is the way it is and why it's so good that it's very strict
2022-03-11 19:22
C, rust
2022-03-11 12:52
1 reply
rust is the future
2022-03-20 10:44
scratch
2022-03-11 12:54
2 replies
#49
 | 
Finland uSnaj69
+1
2022-03-11 13:08
#75
 | 
Norway thojo
god amongst men
2022-03-11 13:46
c#
2022-03-11 12:55
1 reply
+1
2022-03-11 19:22
#30
NiKo | 
Poland zdb11
java, ftw
2022-03-11 12:55
#31
 | 
Romania assdada
assembly, im not normie
2022-03-11 12:56
java & python x.x
2022-03-11 12:56
C# Now I'm studying regular C at Uni, only about 5 weeks in and it's already getting a bit difficult :(
2022-03-11 12:58
2 replies
#36
 | 
Norway thojo
C & C++ are hard yeah, but dont give up, try to make stuff in your free time with them
2022-03-11 13:01
czirkos GOAT
2022-03-11 19:18
c#
2022-03-11 13:03
i like them all (the ones that i know) even if C++ pisses me off more than others C, C++,C#, Python but each one for specific needs i mainly work with C# and python nowadays
2022-03-11 13:06
Java, C++
2022-03-11 13:04
#41
 | 
United Kingdom Fayn02
JavaScript B). Don't hate mens)
2022-03-11 13:04
1 reply
based javascript++ Unfortunately, since I started working with JS + typescript annotation and C# working with ruby without type hinting has been very cringe
2022-03-11 15:52
none, the popular/modern ones are all similar af assuming you don't care about small optimization, low level hardware shit or OOP (prefer using my own data structures seperate from main logic anyway) web based ones , idk but javascript sucks.
2022-03-11 13:06
3 replies
it doesn't assume you don't care, it's just that in most cases you shouldn't really care... obviously when you build a low level system that needs to think of every memory usage, you'll obviously use c/c++ or something similar, in most cases with today's technology it just doesn't matter. You can build a desktop app that uses 10k memory with c++, or use electron to build a cross platform desktop app that uses 70k memory, but who cares about that nowadays? it's just wrong to assume that in every case you'll need that.
2022-03-11 13:12
2 replies
I worded that poorly but I agree, if the user doesn't need low level control they can use anything. The only thing I consider with languages is library/framework support personally.
2022-03-11 13:39
1 reply
true, true. besides python which I simply can't stand the indentation syntax shit.
2022-03-11 14:14
#45
 | 
Denmark kbye_
scala
2022-03-11 13:06
1 reply
+1
2022-03-14 12:56
#47
 | 
Other JANELAAA
PHP for sure :^)
2022-03-11 13:08
js, more specifically the nodejs ecosystem as it's just so powerful with it's package manager. python's pip for example sucks ass. c++ is awesome, and I should definitely check out golang. I used to like Java, it's still nice as a language but kinda outdated, at least last I checked...didn't use it for quite some time now.
2022-03-11 13:08
9 replies
Why does pip suck ass lol
2022-03-11 15:30
8 replies
because it sucks ass for big scales, it doesn't even generate the requirements file automatically nor update it and you need to install a package to create this or manually save the output to a file. seriously, how bad can this actually be.
2022-03-11 15:55
7 replies
#142
 | 
North America minte
just use poetry my man
2022-03-11 16:00
6 replies
I'm not using python much as I really dislike the indentation thingy, but it looks nice, I'll surely give it a try next time I'm going to use python :) 10x.
2022-03-11 16:03
5 replies
I mean, most of the languages have some sort of indentation guidelines which you should follow in a work environment ideally. Only that python gives you errors if you don't obey this guideline, in exchange for no { } funky business. I'll take it honestly, and anyway there are auto-formatters so...
2022-03-11 16:15
4 replies
The difference is that it knows that a section is starting or ending due to the brackets while with indentation it doesn't, so you just have to do things differently for the stupid formatters to actually work. no thanks.
2022-03-11 22:48
3 replies
PyCharm has a solid auto-formatter, I've been doing python for like 3y, and formatting is my last problem
2022-03-11 22:55
2 replies
So hf :) I don't like it, it never worked well enough no matter which IDE I tried, don't see a reason to do something that I don't enjoy.
2022-03-11 23:03
1 reply
Yes, ok, gl with your languages/ides too, hf
2022-03-11 23:39
Tbf js is the swiss knife nowadays. You cant go wrong with it. But ofc it all depends on the area you work on. I wouldnt try to get a js vm running on a microcontroller lol
2022-03-11 13:11
1 reply
Well, there's already Espruino.
2022-03-14 21:16
#56
swag | 
Cyprus Porgos
Python because it's the simplest language, but a C variant is better to learn first, so you can understand the programming logic
2022-03-11 13:12
#57
 | 
Romania krenfixx
C, C#
2022-03-11 13:14
C
2022-03-11 13:15
ASSEMBLY BABY
2022-03-11 13:16
3 replies
#89
 | 
Denmark kbye_
nt
2022-03-11 13:52
1 reply
GOT A SOFT SPOT FOR X86 I USED TO WORK IN IT
2022-03-11 13:57
Who hurt you?
2022-03-14 17:26
#61
 | 
Poland Fealis_
C#, TypeScript
2022-03-11 13:18
#66
 | 
Sweden Akoulad
C# C / C++ / Rust (tied) Typescript
2022-03-11 13:28
R Julia
2022-03-11 13:33
3 replies
Flag))) Feels like Linkedin all over again, overwhelming number of data scientists are from India
2022-03-11 15:31
2 replies
True lmao. But I'm not a data scientist/AI ML engineering. I was also taught MATLAB and Fortran, but not my favourites. Julia bestest.
2022-03-11 17:24
1 reply
ML eng here too, cheers bro! Julia is nice, I agree. Far from wide adoption, but nice
2022-03-11 17:50
My first love was PHP. Now I prefer Python. And also VBA should get some love.
2022-03-11 13:43
2 replies
#76
 | 
Norway thojo
Python is awesome because its so easy
2022-03-11 13:47
1 reply
indeed. If pseudocode is written in english you basically have python code:)
2022-03-11 15:29
java bestesttttt ez #1
2022-03-11 13:47
Kotlin because it's basically Java but without most of the shit things
2022-03-11 13:47
C# and R
2022-03-11 13:48
python and c
2022-03-11 13:48
Lua
2022-03-11 13:49
1 reply
big pp
2022-03-14 21:06
I'm familiar with Java, JS, PHP, a little bit of python and HTML kekw PHP with out any doubts is my favourite
2022-03-11 13:51
Can anyone of you guys pls provide me with from c notes.I need it from the very basics.My semester exams are coming and I missed too much of my classes.
2022-03-11 13:55
For now, C++, but I have a strong impression I'm gonna like Haskell, and maybe will also end up preferring C rather than C++.
2022-03-11 14:03
3 replies
Haskell was hell I would not recommend
2022-03-11 15:28
1 reply
I can't really advocate for Haskell since I know nothing about it or functional programming (yet), but I must admit, since reading the letter from the link below, I'm having good expectations for it :D cs.utexas.edu/users/EWD/transcriptions/O..
2022-03-11 16:17
The only reason to learn Haskell is to configure Xmonad :D
2022-03-11 15:38
css 👍🏿
2022-03-11 14:04
1 reply
#237
 | 
Europe tweekzter
csgo better
2022-03-14 21:09
#95
Dosia | 
Russia Rapu
ABAP :)
2022-03-11 14:06
#98
 | 
France r0ckT
nocode
2022-03-11 14:15
php
2022-03-11 14:16
1 reply
<3
2022-03-11 15:29
#100
 | 
Italy zCri
c#
2022-03-11 14:16
2 replies
#103
 | 
Norway thojo
What do you use it for?
2022-03-11 14:36
1 reply
#105
 | 
Italy zCri
i use it for any programming task i do (except some quick scripting, i use powershell for that), for example server and client side apps that can run on windows, macos, linux with minimal to no adjustment at all and with some frameworks (blazor, uno) they can run even on a web browser it's also great how while it is a managed language with automatic garbage collection etc you can still interact with native code which makes it almost as powerful as low level languages without all the hassle that come with them
2022-03-11 15:27
whatever gets the work done I guess. C# is pretty good
2022-03-11 15:28
python and javascript, starting to learn java now
2022-03-11 15:28
#111
 | 
Russia super_rat
cpp
2022-03-11 15:29
Python and JavaScript, cause it used everywhere so ez job
2022-03-11 15:32
#118
 | 
France PaulST2
C, ocaml, elisp because emacs
2022-03-11 15:32
1 reply
+1 Chad spotted
2022-03-11 18:51
Python not because its easy but because of the nature of how open source it is
2022-03-11 15:33
kotlin and rust people saying javascript should be jailed.
2022-03-11 15:36
1 reply
#135
 | 
Poland BAN_ANIME
>people saying javascript should be jailed based german
2022-03-11 15:55
Assembler
2022-03-11 15:43
C++ for sure. I'm glad no one mentioned Scade or Uniface though
2022-03-11 15:46
#131
 | 
Portugal MGL257
C# and JS
2022-03-11 15:50
COBOL
2022-03-11 15:52
#134
 | 
North America Straf3R
Python. Easy to learn and versatile. EZ network automation bois
2022-03-11 15:54
#137
 | 
Poland BAN_ANIME
C# i guess cuz Unity Engine lol
2022-03-11 15:55
1 reply
#139
 | 
Poland BAN_ANIME
though I remember coding in PHP in school and I kinda liked it
2022-03-11 15:56
C# and TypeScript
2022-03-11 15:56
#141
 | 
North America minte
C++ and Haskell
2022-03-11 16:01
Java and C#
2022-03-11 16:03
Yo mom
2022-03-11 16:04
#146
 | 
United States zovint
C++ and Python. Python is pretty much good for building anything. I use C++ for competitive programming
2022-03-11 16:04
#147
 | 
Finland siloquez
PHP (cos I only know that XD) I've been trying to learn C# now...
2022-03-11 16:05
6 replies
why learn C# if you already know PHP?
2022-03-11 17:37
3 replies
php limits you to legacy webdev mostly c# is more futureproof
2022-03-11 17:50
1 reply
#170
 | 
Finland siloquez
Yeah, PHP for web dev and C# for apps for Windows/Mobile...
2022-03-11 19:10
#173
 | 
France PaulST2
At least with C# you can kinda go fullstack
2022-03-11 19:20
My condolences. PHP wasn't my favourite language even when it was the only one I knew over a decade ago.
2022-03-14 21:15
1 reply
#252
 | 
Finland siloquez
I guess cos the exploitablilty of the language? :D But yeah, I've made webpages for ages and it PHP(+HTML, CSS) was the only thing I needed.
2022-03-15 12:13
#152
 | 
Brazil c41o
Python for data science
2022-03-11 17:19
brainfuck always
2022-03-11 17:27
Javascript
2022-03-11 17:32
Python 100% Or Matlab, because it is what I'm doing my master thesis in so I have to like it.... xD
2022-03-11 17:40
c++, assembly and VHDL representing the HDLs
2022-03-11 17:47
x86 assembly
2022-03-11 17:51
Rust
2022-03-11 18:40
CSS
2022-03-11 18:46
assembly
2022-03-11 19:03
python coz it's rly useful for data analysis stuff. recently got more interested into more low level programming so been self learning some Rust, pleasant experience so far
2022-03-11 19:29
definetly html, css and sql
2022-03-11 19:30
brainfuck the best of all
2022-03-11 22:50
#183
 | 
Brazil ImReverx
C# and Java
2022-03-11 23:03
java
2022-03-11 23:05
scratch
2022-03-11 23:09
html, css, xml
2022-03-11 23:41
vb 'cause it's the one I was good at lul btw a friendly reminder c++ sucks
2022-03-14 17:09
#193
Snax | 
Poland xBG1
html css react
2022-03-14 17:11
Probably Java, because it's easy to develop most enterprise applications with it's rich features and frameworks -- just like C# with the .NET framework.. Now, if I was to choose my preferred language just because I like it, it would probably be C++. I used to write game hacks back in the day, then C++ became my favorite language, not to mention the DirectX SDK from Microsoft, which was used to create nice wallhacks.
2022-03-14 17:13
Coming from a senior developer, if you got a favorite programming lenguaje you aren't a serious programmer.
2022-03-14 17:12
10 replies
While I agree at some level with your sentence, this is not so true. Most of developers (seniors or not) tend to have certain degree of preference to some language. If you look at Linus Torvalds, for example, its clear that his preferred language is C. Remembering that Linus was the creator of the Linux Kernel and Git -- then I guess we are talking about a senior and serious programmer here.
2022-03-14 17:18
6 replies
#216
 | 
Croatia Spinzed
His point is that good programmers don't fanboy for a language; they are engineers, they see it as a tool to solve a problem. How to approach the problem - that's the hard part! While most developers have their own preferences based on their experience of using the tools/languages, being obsessed about particular one is plain stupid and can lead to bad decisions while developing real world apps. That type of devs are young and inexperienced, but they usually grow out of it, over time they will begin to see that.
2022-03-14 18:01
1 reply
Having a favorite one is different than fanboy for one. I think we all agree that being obsessed by a particular language is stupid, but we don't have to ignore the fact that humans have preferences by lots of things, including programming languages. For example: Java and C#. I prefer Java over C#, but it doesn't mean I'm a fanboy of Java (#194) -- I just feel more comfortable writing Java code than C# code because I'm more used to it than C#, then my preference is clearly Java.
2022-03-14 19:43
C is mainly suited for systems programming, so it only makes sense that Linux is written on it. Git could've conceivably been written in some other lenguaje, but it's source code is a damn masterclass, so I reckon C was a quite suitable choice as well. And of course a good programmer will probably be a specialist in only a few (maybe even just 1) lenguajes, but few would call that their favorite. I'm a C++ specialist and I'm much closer to hating it that to loving it. So I guess my point is that not only should your lenguaje of choice depend on what you want to do, but also that if you're particularly knowledgeable about one specific lenguaje, getting to that point has likely made you not very fond of it.
2022-03-14 18:50
3 replies
Actually, Linus already said that he hates Java and C++. To me, this indicates that his favorite programming language is C, and that's ok, humans have preferences. For example: Java and C#. I prefer Java over C#, but it doesn't mean I'm a fanboy of Java (#194) -- I just feel more comfortable writing Java code than C# code because I'm more used to it than C#, so my preference is clearly Java. And actually, for languages that can be compared, you can prefer one over the other (like the example I mentioned, Java and C# can be compared to each other and programmers can prefer one over the other). Now, comparing Javascript to Java or Javascript to C# (even with Nodejs) is as stupid as comparing Python to Java. They are meant to be used for different cases. And yes, I agree 100% with you on the fact that a good programmer will be specialist in few languages and that languages are tools for solving problems, but I don't ignore the fact that some languages can replace others (like Java over C# and vice-versa) -- atleast on the enterprise world.
2022-03-14 19:52
2 replies
Torvalds mongerings should be taken with a grain of salt. The C being the only viable language for kernel development doesn't make other languages useless. Take Perl, which I specced against Python 1.5.2 back in the 90's well, for pure string based parsing stuff Perl was a shy 50x faster than the python variant. I don't recall how, maybe I tested regexp functionality or then just a program that wasn't based on a DFA but the strong point about Python is the data structures and parsing of complex languages. The Perl regexps are not mathematical regular expressions but something more, being still that they are useless unless the language is context-free. I realize that you cannot be a guru on many languages, but a few might make the trick.
2022-03-14 20:26
1 reply
Agreed
2022-03-14 20:42
compare android studio(java) with swift, im pretty sure a vast majority of developers would prefer swift, something that takes 50 lines on swift can easily be >300 lines in java for essentially the same system...
2022-03-14 18:12
lol cringe
2022-03-15 13:52
That is a weird statement. Having a favorite language is in no way the same as not being proficient in other languages. What language I use depend on the task, knowing multiple languages is what gives me the knowledge to have a favorite.
2022-03-15 13:57
#196
 | 
Poland adifrac
typescript, solidity
2022-03-14 17:14
C++ And name checks out
2022-03-14 17:22
C++ ofc, second fav C
2022-03-14 17:22
elixir and ruby
2022-03-14 17:23
3 replies
good taste
2022-03-14 17:50
i bet you doesn't even know what is the beam and how it works
2022-03-14 19:56
1 reply
you're wrong
2022-03-14 21:59
Programming hella cringe
2022-03-14 17:23
2 replies
How is programming cringe lol
2022-03-14 18:21
1 reply
#267
 | 
Norway Nornad
I am a programmer, I know HTML & CSS
2022-03-15 16:37
Probably python. I do mostly C++ for work but python I enjoy more.
2022-03-14 17:26
#207
 | 
Chile gentleeH
wtf 200 comments and no one mentions go. Anyways, my favs are go and python.
2022-03-14 17:34
1 reply
Yeah I was a bit late at #222 :D
2022-03-15 16:55
python/java
2022-03-14 17:35
#210
 | 
Turkey wSrr
html 5 😎😎
2022-03-14 17:48
1 reply
#268
 | 
Norway Nornad
Bestest programmer mens)))
2022-03-15 16:38
ruby
2022-03-14 17:50
C, Assembly, Python and VHDL. Though VHDL is not an imperative programming language. As for people saying that Python is good because it's simple are delirious. The algorithms for interesting things are not exactly simple, and writing them in Python doesn't make it any more easier. If you think Python is simple you haven't really programmed anything interesting yet. I also know a lot of other languages but not sufficiently to make highly optimized code in them. Like Javascript is such a language. I know the basics but that doesn't make me a very good JS programmer.
2022-03-14 17:52
6 replies
VHDL?????? why? never heard anyone say its his favorite language before lol some people like VBA too i guess hehe
2022-03-14 17:59
5 replies
VHDL is a hardware definition language essentially invented by the USA military or something to model hardware according to. The language is rudimentary in that anything can be written in VHDL or Verilog, the two de facto hardware programming languages. There's the control on what happens that is the interesting thing. Like Assembly, you're in charge. Also C is a portable assembly language as some dude stated. Python is for scientific stuff. I don't like Matlab, or I can't afford Matlab, i forget which is true.
2022-03-14 20:17
4 replies
I know what VHDL is, used it and I hate it hehe, but I dislike the hardware aspects of compsci compared to the fields more focused on software. C is pleasant though, which suprised me because usually i tend to prefer more high level languages.
2022-03-15 11:04
3 replies
What's there to dislike about HDL's? They are as close to hardware you get with a programming language of types. I find soldering of discrete logic chips together very therapeutic however. :)
2022-03-15 13:48
2 replies
Nah I just prefer the software aspect of computer science, not that much into electro, nothing wrong with it :) Most people I know who are into electro just find programming as a means to an end though, I dont think anyone would list VHDL as a favorite language as such.
2022-03-15 14:28
1 reply
I can relate to that. Ever since I took as a kid mains electricity into my fingers I've been a bit vary about electronics. It must be 3,3-5V and some small current for me to touch it at all. I like also to write code, and I find it nice to be able to do the code and something happens as a result.
2022-03-15 14:54
c++, most based language
2022-03-14 18:04
Python because it's the one I vaguely know.
2022-03-14 18:05
C/C++, ASM.
2022-03-14 18:10
Probably go.
2022-03-14 18:21
#230
 | 
Bosnia and Herzegovina Biske
java,c,c++
2022-03-14 20:00
python and typescript
2022-03-14 20:32
I really like TypeScript and C#, mainly because I love Visual Studio Code and it works like a charm with those two (which isn't surprising since they're all Microsoft's products).
2022-03-14 21:10
#239
 | 
Europe tweekzter
if( spotA.countEnemies( ) <= 1 ) spotA.rush( dontBlock );
2022-03-14 21:12
If javascript counts then javascript. Otherwise I like C#
2022-03-14 21:13
#245
 | 
Germany mhan
Javascript
2022-03-14 22:34
Can somebody here help me with C
2022-03-14 22:35
3 replies
#250
 | 
Armenia cGev
Yes, what do you need?
2022-03-15 11:07
2 replies
I need notes from the very basics.Thanks in Advance
2022-03-20 10:42
1 reply
#278
 | 
Armenia cGev
Sure thing bro. The only way to learn a new programming language is by writing programs in it. The first program to write is the same for all languages: Print the words hello, world This is a big hurdle; to leap over it you have to be able to create the program text somewhere, compile it successfully, load it, run it, and find out where your output went. With these mechanical details mastered, everything else is comparatively easy. In C, the program to print ``hello, world'' is #include <stdio.h> main() { printf("hello, world\n"); } Just how to run this program depends on the system you are using. As a specific example, on the UNIX operating system you must create the program in a file whose name ends in ``.c'', such as hello.c, then compile it with the command cc hello.c If you haven't botched anything, such as omitting a character or misspelling something, the compilation will proceed silently, and make an executable file called a.out. If you run a.out by typing the command a.out it will print 10 hello, world On other systems, the rules will be different; check with a local expert. Now, for some explanations about the program itself. A C program, whatever its size, consists of functions and variables. A function contains statements that specify the computing operations to be done, and variables store values used during the computation. C functions are like the subroutines and functions in Fortran or the procedures and functions of Pascal. Our example is a function named main. Normally you are at liberty to give functions whatever names you like, but ``main'' is special - your program begins executing at the beginning of main. This means that every program must have a main somewhere. main will usually call other functions to help perform its job, some that you wrote, and others from libraries that are provided for you. The first line of the program, #include <stdio.h> tells the compiler to include information about the standard input/output library; the line appears at the beginning of many C source files. The standard library is described in Chapter 7 and Appendix B. One method of communicating data between functions is for the calling function to provide a list of values, called arguments, to the function it calls. The parentheses after the function name surround the argument list. In this example, main is defined to be a function that expects no arguments, which is indicated by the empty list ( ). #include <stdio.h> include information about standard library main() define a function called main that received no argument values { statements of main are enclosed in braces printf("hello, world\n"); main calls library function printf to print this sequence of characters } \n represents the newline character The first C program The statements of a function are enclosed in braces { }. The function main contains only one statement, printf("hello, world\n"); A function is called by naming it, followed by a parenthesized list of arguments, so this calls the function printf with the argument "hello, world\n". printf is a library function that prints output, in this case the string of characters between the quotes. A sequence of characters in double quotes, like "hello, world\n", is called a character string or string constant. For the moment our only use of character strings will be as arguments for printf and other functions. The sequence \n in the string is C notation for the newline character, which when printed advances the output to the left margin on the next line. If you leave out the \n (a worthwhile experiment), you will find that there is no line advance after the output is printed. You must use \n to include a newline character in the printf argument; if you try something like printf("hello, world "); 11 the C compiler will produce an error message. printf never supplies a newline character automatically, so several calls may be used to build up an output line in stages. Our first program could just as well have been written #include <stdio.h> main() { printf("hello, "); printf("world"); printf("\n"); } to produce identical output. Notice that \n represents only a single character. An escape sequence like \n provides a general and extensible mechanism for representing hard-to-type or invisible characters. Among the others that C provides are \t for tab, \b for backspace, \" for the double quote and \\ for the backslash itself. There is a complete list in Section 2.3. Exercise 1-1. Run the ``hello, world'' program on your system. Experiment with leaving out parts of the program, to see what error messages you get. Exercise 1-2. Experiment to find out what happens when prints's argument string contains \c, where c is some character not listed above. 1.2 Variables and Arithmetic Expressions The next program uses the formula oC=(5/9)(oF-32) to print the following table of Fahrenheit temperatures and their centigrade or Celsius equivalents: 12 1 -17 20 -6 40 4 60 15 80 26 100 37 120 48 140 60 160 71 180 82 200 93 220 104 240 115 260 126 280 137 300 148 The program itself still consists of the definition of a single function named main. It is longer than the one that printed ``hello, world'', but not complicated. It introduces several new ideas, including comments, declarations, variables, arithmetic expressions, loops , and formatted output. #include <stdio.h> /* print Fahrenheit-Celsius table for fahr = 0, 20, ..., 300 */ main() { int fahr, celsius; int lower, upper, step; lower = 0; /* lower limit of temperature scale */ upper = 300; /* upper limit */ step = 20; /* step size */ fahr = lower; while (fahr <= upper) { celsius = 5 * (fahr-32) / 9; printf("%d\t%d\n", fahr, celsius); fahr = fahr + step; } } The two lines /* print Fahrenheit-Celsius table for fahr = 0, 20, ..., 300 */ are a comment, which in this case explains briefly what the program does. Any characters between /* and */ are ignored by the compiler; they may be used freely to make a program easier to understand. Comments may appear anywhere where a blank, tab or newline can. In C, all variables must be declared before they are used, usually at the beginning of the function before any executable statements. A declaration announces the properties of variables; it consists of a name and a list of variables, such as int fahr, celsius; int lower, upper, step; The type int means that the variables listed are integers; by contrast with float, which means floating point, i.e., numbers that may have a fractional part. The range of both int and float depends on the machine you are using; 16-bits ints, which lie between -32768 and +32767, are common, as are 32-bit ints. A float number is typically a 32-bit quantity, with at least six significant digits and magnitude generally between about 10-38 and 1038 . C provides several other data types besides int and float, including: 13 char character - a single byte short short integer long long integer double double-precision floating point The size of these objects is also machine-dependent. There are also arrays, structures and unions of these basic types, pointers to them, and functions that return them, all of which we will meet in due course. Computation in the temperature conversion program begins with the assignment statements lower = 0; upper = 300; step = 20; which set the variables to their initial values. Individual statements are terminated by semicolons. Each line of the table is computed the same way, so we use a loop that repeats once per output line; this is the purpose of the while loop while (fahr <= upper) { ... } The while loop operates as follows: The condition in parentheses is tested. If it is true (fahr is less than or equal to upper), the body of the loop (the three statements enclosed in braces) is executed. Then the condition is re-tested, and if true, the body is executed again. When the test becomes false (fahr exceeds upper) the loop ends, and execution continues at the statement that follows the loop. There are no further statements in this program, so it terminates. The body of a while can be one or more statements enclosed in braces, as in the temperature converter, or a single statement without braces, as in while (i < j) i = 2 * i; In either case, we will always indent the statements controlled by the while by one tab stop (which we have shown as four spaces) so you can see at a glance which statements are inside the loop. The indentation emphasizes the logical structure of the program. Although C compilers do not care about how a program looks, proper indentation and spacing are critical in making programs easy for people to read. We recommend writing only one statement per line, and using blanks around operators to clarify grouping. The position of braces is less important, although people hold passionate beliefs. We have chosen one of several popular styles. Pick a style that suits you, then use it consistently. Most of the work gets done in the body of the loop. The Celsius temperature is computed and assigned to the variable celsius by the statement celsius = 5 * (fahr-32) / 9; The reason for multiplying by 5 and dividing by 9 instead of just multiplying by 5/9 is that in C, as in many other languages, integer division truncates: any fractional part is discarded. Since 5 and 9 are integers. 5/9 would be truncated to zero and so all the Celsius temperatures would be reported as zero. This example also shows a bit more of how printf works. printf is a general-purpose output formatting function, which we will describe in detail in Chapter 7. Its first argument is a string of characters to be printed, with each % indicating where one of the other (second, third, 14 ...) arguments is to be substituted, and in what form it is to be printed. For instance, %d specifies an integer argument, so the statement printf("%d\t%d\n", fahr, celsius); causes the values of the two integers fahr and celsius to be printed, with a tab (\t) between them. Each % construction in the first argument of printf is paired with the corresponding second argument, third argument, etc.; they must match up properly by number and type, or you will get wrong answers. By the way, printf is not part of the C language; there is no input or output defined in C itself. printf is just a useful function from the standard library of functions that are normally accessible to C programs. The behaviour of printf is defined in the ANSI standard, however, so its properties should be the same with any compiler and library that conforms to the standard. In order to concentrate on C itself, we don't talk much about input and output until chapter 7. In particular, we will defer formatted input until then. If you have to input numbers, read the discussion of the function scanf in Section 7.4. scanf is like printf, except that it reads input instead of writing output. There are a couple of problems with the temperature conversion program. The simpler one is that the output isn't very pretty because the numbers are not right-justified. That's easy to fix; if we augment each %d in the printf statement with a width, the numbers printed will be rightjustified in their fields. For instance, we might say printf("%3d %6d\n", fahr, celsius); to print the first number of each line in a field three digits wide, and the second in a field six digits wide, like this: 0 -17 20 -6 40 4 60 15 80 26 100 37 ... The more serious problem is that because we have used integer arithmetic, the Celsius temperatures are not very accurate; for instance, 0 oF is actually about -17.8oC, not -17. To get more accurate answers, we should use floating-point arithmetic instead of integer. This requires some changes in the program. Here is the second version: #include <stdio.h> /* print Fahrenheit-Celsius table for fahr = 0, 20, ..., 300; floating-point version */ main() { float fahr, celsius; float lower, upper, step; lower = 0; /* lower limit of temperatuire scale */ upper = 300; /* upper limit */ step = 20; /* step size */ fahr = lower; while (fahr <= upper) { celsius = (5.0/9.0) * (fahr-32.0); printf("%3.0f %6.1f\n", fahr, celsius); 15 fahr = fahr + step; } } This is much the same as before, except that fahr and celsius are declared to be float and the formula for conversion is written in a more natural way. We were unable to use 5/9 in the previous version because integer division would truncate it to zero. A decimal point in a constant indicates that it is floating point, however, so 5.0/9.0 is not truncated because it is the ratio of two floating-point values. If an arithmetic operator has integer operands, an integer operation is performed. If an arithmetic operator has one floating-point operand and one integer operand, however, the integer will be converted to floating point before the operation is done. If we had written (fahr-32), the 32 would be automatically converted to floating point. Nevertheless, writing floating-point constants with explicit decimal points even when they have integral values emphasizes their floating-point nature for human readers. The detailed rules for when integers are converted to floating point are in Chapter 2. For now, notice that the assignment fahr = lower; and the test while (fahr <= upper) also work in the natural way - the int is converted to float before the operation is done. The printf conversion specification %3.0f says that a floating-point number (here fahr) is to be printed at least three characters wide, with no decimal point and no fraction digits. %6.1f describes another number (celsius) that is to be printed at least six characters wide, with 1 digit after the decimal point. The output looks like this: 0 -17.8 20 -6.7 40 4.4 ... Width and precision may be omitted from a specification: %6f says that the number is to be at least six characters wide; %.2f specifies two characters after the decimal point, but the width is not constrained; and %f merely says to print the number as floating point. %d print as decimal integer %6d print as decimal integer, at least 6 characters wide %f print as floating point %6f print as floating point, at least 6 characters wide %.2f print as floating point, 2 characters after decimal point %6.2f print as floating point, at least 6 wide and 2 after decimal point Among others, printf also recognizes %o for octal, %x for hexadecimal, %c for character, %s for character string and %% for itself. Exercise 1-3. Modify the temperature conversion program to print a heading above the table. Exercise 1-4. Write a program to print the corresponding Celsius to Fahrenheit table
2022-03-20 14:56
C# it's very much becoming the defacto "General" language over Java imo. Write games, ML libraries, Cross platform (routinely mistaken as being "windows" only) and the product team behind it and very much open you can see all the upcoming and historical Language design material on GitHub and it's pretty deep you can do pointer operations with the unsafe syntax. Python as a scripting language is great, when your on some linux box that's locked down and you can't do much (old server boxes that are owned by someone else), you can count on vim and python 2.7 to get you out of some holes. And C++ along with Assembly I really want to sit down at some point and delve into the world reverse engineering specifically kernel level anti cheats and see how they tick, but as most things time is such a precious resource atm
2022-03-15 11:26
#253
 | 
Croatia 1stavno
ruby
2022-03-15 12:15
I build flutter apps so dart it is, apart from that I will say JS
2022-03-15 12:18
js
2022-03-15 12:21
Haskell
2022-03-15 13:52
Delphi. It is based on Pascal, but enhanced so that it is object oriented and all that + the development platform is just better than visual Studio.
2022-03-15 13:53
#264
 | 
Bhutan triskacik
I'll develop hatred for whichever I'm using for current project xd
2022-03-15 14:30
JAVASCRIPT of course its kinda tough sometimes but u can do pretty much anything you want so...
2022-03-15 14:56
Dart, Python
2022-03-15 16:41
Java, it is so easy to use, I love it
2022-03-15 16:44
#276
 | 
Norway Napapijri
Fortran
2022-03-20 10:50
Programming is nerd shit
2022-03-20 10:52
Login or register to add your comment to the discussion.
Now playing
Thumbnail for stream
United Kingdom
ESL TV
51813 viewers
Top streams
All(53)
Casters(37)
Streamers(7)
Organizers(9)
United Kingdom
ESL TV
(51813)
Brazil
gaules
(29895)
Russia
Maincast
(5712)
Finland
pelaajat
(2667)
Other
BLAST Premier
(2309)
United States
fl0m
(2247)
Turkey
berkriptepe
(2137)
Argentina
forg1
(1870)
United Kingdom
Champion of Champions
(1851)
Other
Anomaly
(1658)
Netherlands
D0cC
(1568)
France
1pv
(1322)
Brazil
Apoka
(1290)
Spain
ESL TV
(1155)
Other
Esportal
(1055)
Other
FURIOUSSS
(911)
Russia
Champion of Champions
(838)
Portugal
fox
(784)
Sweden
HeatoN
(698)
Serbia
ArenaEsport (YouTube)
(688)
Other
Fragbite
(583)
Romania
jaxi
(786)
Philippines
Focus Fire
(528)
Turkey
ESA Esports
(468)
Germany
99Damage
(445)
Poland
ESL TV
(383)
Czech Republic
eLEAGUE
(363)
Brazil
mch
(306)
Brazil
Jogando Junto
(238)
Brazil
gaules TV
(226)
Brazil
Liminha
(224)
Ukraine
Maincast
(222)
Poland
Angelka
(213)
Other
ohnePixel
(200)
Kazakhstan
buster
(144)
Hungary
Esport3 TV
(142)
Russia
Corvex
(123)
Slovakia
REPUBLEAGUE A
(106)
Brazil
BTSBrasilFPS
(106)
United Kingdom
Champion of Champions 2
(88)
Denmark
MSL
(86)
Ukraine
Champion of Champions
(85)
Denmark
7ri
(85)
Poland
GoodGame
(74)
United Kingdom
BARDOLPH
(64)
Serbia
ArenaEsport
(62)
Brazil
BTSBrasilCSGO
(59)
Ukraine
Kane
(58)
Denmark
Copenhagen Flames TV
(43)
Spain
Calabuth
(40)
Belarus
Nemiga
(25)
United Kingdom
Emenjay
(22)
Russia
1ceN1ce116
(11)