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IEM Rio 2022 Major Coverage Hub

$1,250,000
Prize pool
24
Teams
Oct 31 - Nov 13
Date
Rio, Brazil
Location
RMR Europe Qualifiers
15th Aug - 27th Aug
RMR Asia Qualifiers
15th Aug - 28th Aug
RMR Americas Qualifiers
15th Aug - 5th Sep
RMR Americas
5th Oct - 9th Oct
RMR Asia
7th Oct - 9th Oct
RMR Europe
4th Oct - 9th Oct
IEM Rio Major 2022
31st Oct - 13th Nov
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IEM Rio 2022 matches

Stage selector
RMR Qualifier
Americas RMR
Asia RMR
Europe RMR
IEM Rio Major
Day selector
31st Oct
1st Nov
2nd Nov
3rd Nov
5th Nov
6th Nov
7th Nov
8th Nov
10th Nov
11th Nov
12th Nov
13th Nov
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The IEM Rio Major EVPs
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[VOD] IEM Rio Major recap on HLTV Confirmed
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Valve release IEM Rio Major champions stickers; announce new RMR invite system
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HObbit: "CS:GO is at its most competitive right now, there's no clean favorite, no era"
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The highs and lows of the IEM Rio Major in photos
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dastan: "It will be in our heart forever"
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Jame jokes about Major victory: "Every tournament helped me win this Major and finally realize I’m not a failure"
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Jame claims IEM Rio Major MVP award
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Outsiders defeat Heroic 2-0 to win IEM Rio Major

How to qualify for the major

The beauty of the CS:GO Majors is that everyone has a shot at qualifying through the open qualifiers in their respective region.
Champions Stage
8 teams
8 spots
Legends Stage
8 RMR Legends teams
8 Challengers stage teams
7 legends
8 challengers
1 legend
Challengers Stage
8 RMR Challengers
8 RMR Contenders
9 spots
2 spots
5 spots
16 spots
2 spots
6 spots
EU RMR A
6 teams invited
10 teams qualified
EU RMR B
6 teams invited
10 teams qualified
Asia RMR
4 teams qualified
Americas RMR
13 teams qualified
3 teams invited
20 spots
4 spots
13 spots
Europe Open Qualifier 1
5 spots
Europe Open Qualifier 2
4 spots
Europe Open Qualifier 3
5 spots
Europe Open Qualifier 4
6 spots
Asia Closed Qualifier
1 spot
Middle East Closed Qualifier
1 spot
Oceania Closed Qualifier
1 spot
China Closed Qualifier
1 spot
North America Open Qualifier 1
2 spots
South America Open Qualifier 1
3 spots
North America Open Qualifier 2
2 spots
South America Open Qualifier 2
2 spots
North America Open Qualifier 3
2 spots
South America Open Qualifier 3
2 spots

Jeunesse Arena

The playoffs of the IEM Rio Major will take place in the multi-purpose Jeunesse Arena, previously known as the Rio Olympic Arena, which fits up to 18,700 people. The arena is used for sports such as basketball and gymnastics, and has hosted an NBA match, UFC fights, concerts, as well as League of Legends and Rainbow Six Siege tournaments.

18,700
Capacity
Rio de Janerio
Location
Portuguese
Commentary in arena
More about the venue & city
Image from the venue

Riocentro Hall

Riocentro is the largest exhibition center in Latin America, and will host the Challengers and Legend stages of the IEM Rio Major in its Hall 6. Riocentro is located near the Jeunesse Arena, where the playoffs will take place, and has hosted Pan American Games and Olympics in the past. During the 2014 FIFA World Cup, Riocentreo was utilised as the HQ of the International Broadcast Centre.

4,000
Expected crowd
Rio de Janerio
Location
Portuguese
Commentary in arena
More about the venue & city
Concept of groupstage with crowd

Did you know?

Player signature stickers were introduced ahead of ESL One Cologne 2015.

CS:GO Major winners through the years

Image from DreamHack Winter 2013
fnatic
DreamHack Winter 2013

The inaugural Major in CS:GO was secured by fnatic in surprise fashion as they defeated heavy favorites, the famous 87-0 NIP, 2-1 in the final. Star AWPer JW led the way for his team.

Go to event page
Image from EMS One Katowice 2014
Virtus.pro
EMS One Katowice 2014

Virtus.Pro stormed so convincingly to victory on home soil that this Major performance earned them the nickname "Virtus.Plow", with NIP taking yet another silver medal.

Go to event page
Image from ESL One Cologne 2014
NIP
ESL One Cologne 2014

Finally NIP won the Major their dominance of early CS:GO history so richly deserved, with their entry fragger Friberg picking up the MVP nod for his impact throughout the tournament.

Go to event page
Image from DreamHack Winter 2014
LDLC
DreamHack Winter 2014

LDLC grabbed a Major victory that was overshadowed by the infamous 'olofboost' incident that occurred in their quarterfinal with fnatic; such was the backlash from the incident that instead of accepting the proposed replay, fnatic forfeited the game.

Go to event page
Image from ESL One Katowice 2015
fnatic
ESL One Katowice 2015

A replay of the first Major final saw fnatic again emerge triumphant in the all-Swedish derby, earning the organization its second Major trophy. This would mark NIP's fifth and last appearance in a Major final.

Go to event page
Image from ESL One Cologne 2015
fnatic
ESL One Cologne 2015

fnatic emerged victorious in a battle with French titans Envy, marking history by being the first team in CS:GO to win back-to-back Majors. The crowning achievement of what would come to be known as the 'fnatic era'.

Go to event page
Image from DreamHack Open Cluj-Napoca 2015
Envy
DreamHack Open Cluj-Napoca 2015

Frenchmen Envy took the title in Romania, with the same core of players that won DreamHack Winter 2014, beating a NAVI side who were appearing in their first Major final.

Go to event page
Image from MLG Columbus 2016
Luminosity
MLG Columbus 2016

The Columbus Major was the first to feature a $1M dollar prize pool, the first to take place outside of Europe, and the first to be won by a non-European team; the Brazilians of LG would bring the Major trophy home to South-America.

Go to event page
Image from ESL One Cologne 2016
SK
ESL One Cologne 2016

The Brazilian squad that won Columbus picked up their second Major in Cologne, this time under the SK banner. coldzera was again the standout for his team, earning his second Major MVP.

Go to event page
Image from ELEAGUE Major 2017
Astralis
ELEAGUE Major 2017

The Danes of Astralis secured their first Major title in Atlanta, besting the very same Virtus.Pro who won the Katowice Major in 2014 after a memorable comeback on Train.

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Image from PGL Major Krakow 2017
Gambit
PGL Major Krakow 2017

Krakow bore witness to the greatest underdog run in CS:GO Major history, as world number 15 Gambit secured the Major title under the leadership of NAVI legend Zeus.

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Image from ELEAGUE Major 2018
Cloud9
ELEAGUE Major 2018

Cloud9 won North America's first Major in dramatic fashion, coming back from a 11-15 deficit on the final map to beat FaZe in overtime in front of a packed and raucous home crowd.

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Image from FACEIT Major 2018
Astralis
FACEIT Major 2018

Astralis picked up their second Major title in London after a dominant run in the bracket stage. The Danes had a flawless 6-0 map score in playoffs and beat NAVI in the final to lift the trophy.

Go to event page
Image from IEM Katowice 2019
Astralis
IEM Katowice 2019

Astralis became only the second team to win three majors and two back-to-back with victory in Katowice, ending the fairy-tale run of underdog Finns ENCE to do so.

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Image from StarLadder Berlin Major 2019
Astralis
StarLadder Berlin Major 2019

History was made at this Major as Astralis became the only team to win four Majors and three back-to-back, once again beating surprise finalists to seal it, this time in the form of the CIS squad AVANGAR.

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Image from PGL Major Stockholm 2021
Natus Vincere
PGL Major Stockholm 2021

After three second-place finishes, NAVI finally secured a Major title on the wings of an incredible MVP performance from s1mple. The CIS team made history as the first one to win a Major without dropping a single map.

Go to event page
Image from PGL Major Antwerp 2022
FaZe
PGL Major Antwerp 2022

In the packed-to-the-brim Antwerps Sportpaleis in Belgium, karrigan finally lifted his first Major trophy with FaZe. The squad also made history as the first international team to win the Valve-sponsored event.

Go to event page

First Major in South America

The IEM Rio Major will make history as the first CS:GO World Championship event held outside of the game's two main regions, Europe and North America. Tournament organizer ESL will be in charge of running the event in Brazil, where they previously hosted ESL Pro League Season 4 and ESL One Belo Horizonte, with numerous fans from the country rejoicing at the opportunity to witness a Major on home soil.


The prize pool for the Major will once again amount to $1,250,000, with the tournament winner set to take home half of the pot for their efforts, $500,000. There is a significant drop in prize money allocated to the runners-up, just $150,000, while the 3-4th placed teams would earn less than half of that, $70,000. However, both organizations and players that qualify for the IEM Rio Major will be expecting significant profits from the in-game sticker sales, which are released shortly before the event kicks off.

Placement Prize
1st $500,000
2nd $150,000
3rd-4th $70,000
5th-8th $35,000
9th-16th $8,750
17th-24th $0
Start date Oct 31st
End date Nov 13th
Teams 24
Prize pool $1,250,000

CS:GO Major winners overview

Event Date Prize pool Location 2nd Winner
IEM Rio Major 2022
Nov 05 - Nov 13 2022 $1,250,000 BrazilRio de Janeiro, Brazil
Heroic
Outsiders
PGL Major Antwerp 2022
May 14 - May 22 2022 $1,000,000 BelgiumAntwerp, Belgium
Natus Vincere
FaZe
PGL Major Stockholm 2021
Oct 30 - Nov 07 2021 $2,000,000 SwedenStockholm, Sweden
G2
Natus Vincere
StarLadder Major Berlin 2019
Aug 28 - Sep 08 2019 $1,000,000 GermanyBerlin, Germany
AVANGAR
Astralis
IEM Katowice 2019
Feb 20 - Mar 03 2019 $1,000,000 PolandKatowice, Poland
ENCE
Astralis
FACEIT Major 2018
Sep 12 - Sep 23 2018 $1,000,000 United KingdomLondon, United Kingdom
Natus Vincere
Astralis
ELEAGUE Major 2018
Jan 19 - Jan 28 2018 $1,000,000 United StatesAtlanta & Boston, United States
FaZe
Cloud9
PGL Major Krakow 2017
Jul 16 - Jul 23 2017 $1,000,000 PolandKrakow, Poland
Immortals
Gambit
ELEAGUE Major 2017
Jan 22 - Jan 29 2017 $1,000,000 United StatesAtlanta, Georgia, USA
Virtus.pro
Astralis
ESL One Cologne 2016
Jul 05 - Jul 10 2016 $1,000,000 GermanyCologne, Germany
Liquid
SK
MLG Columbus 2016
Mar 29 - Apr 03 2016 $1,000,000 United StatesColumbus, Ohio, USA
Natus Vincere
Luminosity
DreamHack Open Cluj-Napoca 2015
Oct 28 - Nov 01 2015 $250,000 RomaniaCluj-Napoca, Romania
Natus Vincere
Envy
ESL One Cologne 2015
Aug 20 - Aug 23 2015 $250,000 GermanyCologne, Germany
Envy
fnatic
ESL One Katowice 2015
Mar 12 - Mar 15 2015 $250,000 PolandKatowice, Poland
Ninjas in Pyjamas
fnatic
DreamHack Winter 2014
Nov 27 - Nov 29 2014 $250,000 SwedenJönköping, Sweden
Ninjas in Pyjamas
LDLC
ESL One Cologne 2014
Aug 14 - Aug 17 2014 $250,000 GermanyCologne, Germany
fnatic
Ninjas in Pyjamas
EMS One Katowice 2014
Mar 13 - Mar 16 2014 $250,000 PolandKatowice, Poland
Ninjas in Pyjamas
Virtus.pro
DreamHack Winter 2013
Nov 28 - Nov 30 2013 $250,000 SwedenJönköping, Sweden
Ninjas in Pyjamas
fnatic

History of CS:GO Majors

CS:GO Majors are the biggest Counter-Strike event on the calendar. They have been hosted since 2013 by various tournament organizers, and backed by game developer Valve.

DreamHack Winter 2013, the first Major since the release of Global Offensive, was won by fnatic who upset favorites NIP in the grand final. The, at the time, staggering $250,000 prize pool was supported by the community through the purchase of keys for the esports skin case, while those that watched Major matches live were rewarded by drops such as the prized Cobblestone Souvenir Package.

In the early years, three Majors were held during a year, with each of them being played out within less than a week. From 2016 onwards, only two Majors are hosted each year, but the prize pool was increased to $1,250,000 and the events were continually expanded to accommodate for more extensive formats.

Longer events and big arenas

MLG Columbus was the first Major to be held outside of Europe and the first one won by a non-European team, Luminosity Gaming, while Cloud9 secure North America their first and only Major trophy at ELEAGUE Boston in 2018. Teams such as Virtus.pro, LDLC, and Gambit won Majors over the years, but fnatic with three victories and Astralis with four stand out as the most successful Major teams of all times.

The latest Counter-Strike World Championship was PGL Antwerp, taking place in Belgium in May of 2022. The trophy was claimed by FaZe, who defeated previous Major winners Natus Vincere in the grand final and became the first Major-winning international team.

Image from an earlier CS:GO Major
Image from an earlier CS:GO Major
Image from an earlier CS:GO Major
Image from an earlier CS:GO Major
Image from an earlier CS:GO Major
Image from an earlier CS:GO Major
Image from an earlier CS:GO Major