Key takeaways from ELEAGUE

The dust has settled in Atlanta and it's time for us to look back at the ten-week-long ELEAGUE and see what we can take away from it.

Only three days ago we witnessed Virtus.pro take the highest step of the podium in Atlanta's Cobb Energy Centre following a clear-cut victory over fnatic in the grand final, the culmination of ten weeks worth of competition.

Over the last two months a total of 106 matches, or 144 maps, were played in Atlanta, which makes ELEAGUE one of the biggest LAN tournaments we've ever seen in Counter-Strike history.

As such, we decided to step back and take a look at the unique event overall to find out which new storylines it brought us and what we can learn from it:

Virtus.pro still has "it"

Virtus.pro's patience was tested over and over in the first few months of 2016, when Janusz "Snax" Pogorzelski's form took an unexpected hit and the Poles posed as a target of much criticism from community and experts alike.

They slowly gained some confidence back throughout the second quarter of the year, but the longest-standing lineup showcased their best level in the playoffs of ELEAGUE.

Dropping zero maps and less than nine rounds per map on average in the bracket stage, Virtus.pro's journey to victory was one of the most dominating performances we've seen at big events. 


Snax and NEO each stood out in their own way

The grand final was a spectacle of its own, both in terms of individual and strategical play. The plow emerged yet again with a few added features, such as the brilliant double-fake in an eco on Mirage, Snax's seemingly impossible 1v4 attempt, or the nade-stack onto Jesper "JW" Wecksell in dropzone on Cobblestone.

A huge part of that success was none other than Snax, who kept reminding us of his old self in the past two weeks, recording a monstrously high 1.45 rating due to extreme consistency in the series versus NiP (#6), mousesports (#9) and fnatic (#2).

While everyone from Virtus.pro turned up and played above their three-month average, there is one other player that stood out from the crowd, and that is Filip "NEO" Kubski. The 29-year-old hit a few highs in the playoffs, specifically on Dust2 against NiP and on Cobblestone versus fnatic. But most of all he stood out because of his huge turn-around doubles and triples, as well as his ability to consistently dish out the most damage across the three series, almost reaching an average of 100 damage per round (98.8).

olofmeister is still not at his 100%

Olof "olofmeister" Kajbjer has always been a big-match, big-event player, as shown by last year's stats where he placed first in rating at big events (1.20) and first again in big matches rating (semi-finals and finals) with 1.13.

He has also always been a player who created opportunities for himself and his team seemingly out of thin air, no matter how his teammates played, which is also a big part of the reason why he was considered the best player in the world for a long period of time.


olofmeister's underwhelming display in the grand final reminded us of Columbus

olofmeister returned just in time for the beginning of ELEAGUE to show playing Counter-Strike is like riding a bike. A lot of the time he did play as if he never left to recover from his injury, but that wasn't the case in the grand final against Virtus.pro.

Prior to his injury, there were only very few cases where olofmeister disappeared in fnatic's last match of a tournament, only two in fact: in semi-finals against the Poles at ESL ESEA Dubai Invitational in September 2015, and in another semis when he took ill, against Titan at DreamHack Stockholm Invitational in September 2014.

This year it has already happened twice more: shortly after his injury came to light, at MLG Columbus versus Astralis, and now in the grand final of ELEAGUE where he averaged a 0.68 rating and only played well in the early rounds. Whether or not the injury still affects him, olofmeister has not yet fully recovered from the time he took off to deal with it.

Spots need to be held by teams as opposed to organizations

During ELEAGUE we were reminded of how organization-owned spots in competitions can cause a mess that wouldn't happen in the other possibility we've grown used to over the years.

Following the drama-filled transfer of Luminosity to SK, both the Brazilians (who qualified for playoffs) and the former SK side, now known as X (with a place in the last chance qualifier), were disqualified due to the move not complying with the league's rules.

The only part where the rulebook mentions lineups states that "teams" (which refers to organizations and not the roster, as explained by ELEAGUE after the disqualification) are allowed to use two substitutes, who had to be submitted by May 18th - prior to the start of the tournament.

Apart from the more obvious explanation why teams should own spots, which is that they deserve them by either qualifying or being one of the best in the world and as such shouldn't be replaced by anyone who doesn't, there is another problem with this specific rule.

By setting up this ruleset, ELEAGUE basically expected teams to adjust their contracts according to the tournament's schedule, which is completely unreasonable considering the rosters had signed deals with their organizations months or years prior to the announcement of ELEAGUE.

For example, if Virtus.pro's two-year contract ended during the tournament and the team signed with someone else, they would've been punished for a decision they made in 2014.


SK and Team X were pushed out for seemingly no benefit

It's also unreasonable for ELEAGUE to expect teams to stay with their organizations beyond the agreed time only because of one out of multiple significant tournament organizers, especially because the entire competition took ten weeks to unfold and nearly every team attended other events in the meantime.

Turner and WME | IMG need to address this as soon as possible, as even if teams were to attempt to comply with the aforementioned rules and avoid similar situations in the next season, they have no means of doing so as the details of the second season haven't been revealed yet.

The same issue caused disagreements between select North American players and their organizations, who had signed a petition in an attempt to push the Brazilian team out of ELEAGUE without the knowledge of their players.

The only potential outcome of such actions, though ELEAGUE stated they had made the decision before the petition was signed, was Cloud9's inclusion in the playoffs instead of the disqualified SK.

Was that one spot in playoffs worth the trouble? What were the benefits of disqualifying potentially two playoffs teams at the cost of a tarnished reputation and bad press?

The ten-week schedule is too long to keep track of

The tournament system made sure the best teams made it out of the groups, and then second-placed teams met each other alongside two third-placed in a separate bracket, which is also a good way to find the last two teams for quarter-finals.

The overall amount of matches (15 per group, or between 18-21 maps) meant the competition had to be spread out into six weeks only for the group stage however, which is simply way too long to be able to keep track of the tournament's story.

By the time you get to week six, let alone the quarter-finals two weeks afterwards, you barely remember anything about the matches you saw during the first week, so the fluidity and storylines within the event are nearly wiped out for spectators.

It was still somewhat exciting to see such a unique format in play and it was worth the try, but with multiple other tournaments happening in between groups, CS:GO isn't the game to appreciate it.

The good news is, the organizers seem to understand that and have already announced that the second season will be shorter, so hopefully this time we'll be able to enjoy the competition in full.


ELEAGUE's Season 2 will be shorter

CSGO + TV = ?

ELEAGUE was CS:GO's first real attempt at making it into the big mainstream media on a consistent basis, having been televised every Friday evening on the American channel TBS throughout the past ten weeks.

One question that hasn't really been answered yet was how many new viewers ELEAGUE and TBS actually attracted to CS:GO, and it probably won't clear up any time soon, unless we get more televised competitions.

According to a release, during the first season ELEAGUE gathered nearly 19 million total viewers on TBS, which sounds high, but to see what that actually means we'd have to see the more telling numbers, such as minutes watched per viewer, unique viewers, the concurrent peaks and more.

Thus far we've only got a solid comparison to other sporting events, but only of week one numbers, accounting to 509,000 total viewers, which is higher than the regular season average of the NHL broadcast on NBC Sports (384,000).

From responses on social media that were shown during ELEAGUE broadcasts, plenty of regular viewers watched parts of the tournament with their parents and friends who haven't been involved with the scene up to that point, which at least shows promise of educating a new audience about Counter-Strike.

 

What did you take away from the ten weeks of competition in Atlanta? Let us know your thoughts by commenting below.

You can follow HLTV.org's Milan "Striker" Švejda on Twitter

Sweden Olof 'olofmeister' Kajbjer
Olof 'olofmeister' Kajbjer
Age:
27
Team:
Rating 1.0:
1.09
Maps played:
1289
KPR:
0.74
DPR:
0.65
APR:
0.13
Poland Filip 'NEO' Kubski
Filip 'NEO' Kubski
Age:
32
Team:
No team
Rating 1.0:
0.97
Maps played:
1681
KPR:
0.66
DPR:
0.67
APR:
0.17
Sweden Jesper 'JW' Wecksell
Jesper 'JW' Wecksell
Age:
24
Team:
Rating 1.0:
1.06
Maps played:
1547
KPR:
0.74
DPR:
0.68
APR:
0.14
Poland Janusz 'Snax' Pogorzelski
Janusz 'Snax' Pogorzelski
Age:
26
Team:
Rating 1.0:
1.04
Maps played:
1524
KPR:
0.71
DPR:
0.66
APR:
0.14
#1
Aleksib | 
Bangladesh 696969 
Olof will be at dat 100% in 2 months ;)
2016-08-02 22:18
iscored 69.69 percent in engineering test :]
2016-08-02 22:30
#38
Aleksib | 
Bangladesh 696969 
NICE!
2016-08-02 22:31
EZ 4 ENCE !
2016-08-02 22:31
cyka americano gtfo
2016-08-03 07:11
s1mple back to dAT confirmed
2016-08-03 01:57
Olaf needs to find some new hacks. Seems his hack writer retired or something.
2016-08-03 10:16
#2
 | 
Denmark fReddyFromDK 
f
2016-08-02 22:17
i are think that
2016-08-02 22:19
#4
World DEY0 
HLTV LEGEND HERE
2016-08-02 22:17
yes DENYO
2016-08-02 22:18
Fnatic is so overrated now
2016-08-02 22:18
e
2016-08-02 22:17
1
2016-08-02 22:17
Wow... Nice :D
2016-08-02 22:17
#10
Brazil jlp6 
ae
2016-08-02 22:17
#13
 | 
Sweden DaddyCheese 
Bush did 9/11
2016-08-02 22:17
not even close
2016-08-02 22:17
oh no
2016-08-02 22:17
oh
2016-08-02 22:17
#17
 | 
Saudi Arabia JamesJameson 
1st
2016-08-02 22:17
lol
2016-08-02 22:17
1
2016-08-02 22:17
1
2016-08-02 22:17
This is an international site, please write your comment in English. Comments in another language will be deleted.1
2016-08-02 22:17
#94
 | 
Brazil oskadopLis 
Até parece
2016-08-03 01:16
This is an international site, please write your comment in English. Comments in another language will be deleted.2
2016-08-03 06:08
nice
2016-08-02 22:18
#23
 | 
Russia f0wlie 
Everybody type in the chat alex is a stupid ginger
2016-08-02 22:18
What's up dramaalert nation, killer keemstar here
2016-08-03 10:15
#26
 | 
France Ryzerr 
The shit GOTV that we had on the stream. That's all I remember
2016-08-02 22:18
#27
JW | 
Sweden Hasklon 
n1
2016-08-02 22:19
nah, fuck eleague.
2016-08-02 22:22
Enough of shitty BO1s
2016-08-02 22:22
The entire tournament had no Bo1.
2016-08-02 22:30
Don't know if you're retarded or just new to the game
2016-08-02 22:39
The entire tournament had no Bo1.
2016-08-02 22:39
Confirmed retarded. Group stage was all BO1
2016-08-02 22:42
No, it was all Bo2.
2016-08-02 22:42
Confirmed new to the game. 2 BO1s is not a BO2. There were no way to "tie" a game, like it happens in a BO2.
2016-08-02 22:45
There actually was, their stats were 1-1 and it was a tie. Are you fuck you?
2016-08-02 22:45
I'm done. You're full retard. Bye
2016-08-02 22:48
Good bye idiot.
2016-08-02 22:48
Dude... i hope you are baiting If not Never go full retard.
2016-08-02 22:54
Nice 2nd account
2016-08-02 22:55
Oh my... u did go full retard.
2016-08-03 10:26
he is b8ing bro haha, he cant be so dumb
2016-08-03 04:37
tv for south america, please.
2016-08-02 22:24
#71
 | 
Europe wai7ing 
for monkeys?
2016-08-02 23:10
No, even monkeys had a broadcast on TV here.
2016-08-02 23:22
yes we have, on direc tv, hey silver you have 2 majors? NOPE!
2016-09-18 03:56
I think E-league was amazing show with many memorable matches. Yes its kinda long but thats the beauty of it. I mean , we got so many one of the same tournaments over and over , why not something different ? E-league did phenomenal job , i cant wait for next one. Something to see between other big tournaments is never bad. The only thing i would like to see from E-league change is the FINAL be BO5 and not BO3. And nothing else.
2016-08-02 22:29
Yah agree I thought it was perfect maybe some more Partnership Deals with Europe's TV Channels and we will be gut
2016-08-02 23:31
#97
 | 
Estonia swag420weed 
Watched last major from TV live. Viasat esports channel or some shit. Viasat is owned by MTG, like ESL and Dreamhack.
2016-08-03 02:16
Way to long, i think.
2016-08-03 06:09
"Key takeaway from Eleague" SK?
2016-08-02 22:28
Haha here have a cookie.
2016-08-02 22:30
Spots should not be held by players. They should be held by the org. You have it all wrong. Just because some shady Brazilians decided to undercut their org, doesn't mean they spot at the front of the line should be preserved.
2016-08-02 22:29
Try to at least counter the arguments from the article and provide some of your own?
2016-08-02 22:32
Even though for me, as a normal CSGO fan/viewer, it makes more sense for the players to own the spot, Thorin did put a good argument (or more like, explanation), on why in ELEAGUE orgs own the spot, which is because TV is a different industry that does things in a different way (they want to do business with stable business partners, not ones that might not exist the next day). They need to secure different types of sponsors, and sell a differently packaged product, to a potentially different audience. So, I don't like the fact that SK/ex-SK were disqualified because I am familiar with their back-stories and with the fact that esports players switch orgs like they change sweatshirts But, for a potential TV viewer, where the only Counter Strike he's seen in his life is the ELEAGUE (imagine a person who owns CSGO as a game and has played casually, but never got into the viewing aspect of the esport), it would be extremely confusing to follow that 2 teams now have different names/logos; even more so when one of the teams now has the name that the other previously had.
2016-08-02 22:54
Here's my counter argument: How is it any easier for that blissfully ignorant viewer to understand that Luminosity and SK simply disappeared from the league? It was again confusing for them in that way. And it takes the same amount of effort to explain both things, whether they try to teach the audience that the players changed their organization or that the organization is disqualified. In the end I am pretty confident that that viewer would equally understand or not understand if they did it the other way around, so I don't accept this as a reason at all. To further add to the general point about how ELEAGUE wants to do business - the core of their early announcements of the league was that they will not change the way things are done in our scene. And they did, at terrible expense for their own tournament and image, and the expense of two teams.
2016-08-02 23:01
Fair enough about the effort to explain org switches/disqualifications, I'm just being the devil's advocate. As long as the rest of the scene organizers do things the right way, I don't see the problem with ELEAGUE being a wildcard organizer that does something different. But I certainly wouldn't like the whole of the scene to be run like ELEAGUE does. Anyway, I don't even understand why they're trying to put esports on TV. Its a dead medium.
2016-08-02 23:14
I think that's a flawed logic, you're a fan of rosters, not organizations (or you should be, if you like high level Counter-Strike), so if an org decides to switch a team after contracts run out, the logo might stay the same but will you still root for a completely different lineup? If you don't follow the game enough to know at least the biggest teams, the game shouldn't be adjusted to you, but to the people who follow it in-depth. I know some people are that way, but I'm pretty sure it's a minority.
2016-08-02 23:07
#79
Aleksib | 
Finland Slyp3 
I believe many would root for nip if they would do big roster change but still had maybe 2 or 1 se player. E.g. gtr and forest. As the brand NiP is so famous :D And at the end of the day csgo players are working for the organisations, so the organisations own the players when they are playing. Same wayas Dallas stars can change the whole core but the core that was left out doesnt own the spot, but the organisation does. In this skenario ex-LG shouldnt be disqualified but they should go to last chance qualifier as sk as organisation owned it :^)
2016-08-02 23:42
you are the prime example of someone biased who looks for whatever excuse he can find to justify his opinion instead of having an honest discussion. ex-sk got cut from their organization and booted from eleague not because of "some shady brazilians" but because of decisions the sk org made and because of the questionable rules of eleauge. esports aren't mature enough yet for such rule set. there should be a governing body in place and probably a player association before leagues should try to implement the kind of rule set eleague has.
2016-08-02 22:41
#52
fer | 
Brazil Luizim 
Who plays? The players or the org? Enough said. Orgs must be seen as sponsors and that's all.
2016-08-02 22:42
#80
Aleksib | 
Finland Slyp3 
No. Orgs owns the players when they represent the team. They are employeers of the organisation same way as social media chief is ^^
2016-08-02 23:43
So let the org play then, or create their own org, like Astralis did.
2016-08-03 06:12
#112
Aleksib | 
Finland Slyp3 
Thata like saying "let mcdonalds make their food then". And yes if that is problwm to pros they have to make their own organisations
2016-08-03 10:02
LG contract ends choice -1 or 2 years with LG to play eleague (not even have gaming house) -sign with SK +gaming house +better salaries...
2016-08-02 22:48
#98
 | 
Estonia swag420weed 
Yes, orgs should jold spots. And if line up changes they shouödnt be kicked out.
2016-08-03 02:17
#35
 | 
Lithuania Tomekas85 
ez
2016-08-02 22:30
Good work Striker!
2016-08-02 22:33
#43
 | 
Poland trancemeister 
Virtus.Plow <3 Snax & Nijo <3
2016-08-02 22:35
Well 2 matches in a row, I coudln't watch a VP game, because the BO3 started at 04:00 CEST,which is not a big deal for NA people obviously.
2016-08-02 22:37
> "Spots need to be held by teams as opposed to organisations". Only part I disagree with. I don't think there's anything wrong with EL giving the organisations the right of membership rather than the individual players of the teams. So long as the proper checks and balances are in place, which is the real issue at the moment. If organisations are treated as partners, it gives them more incentive to re-invest in the league and, imo, allows more potential for a sustainable business. Players are still insanely fickle, and if EL are investing as much as they are into eSports their best bet would be work with the organisation.
2016-08-02 22:38
all other tournaments are so, slots are to players, if terminate the contract with the org during the tournament, players are not required to stay in the same org
2016-08-02 22:55
#67
Aleksib | 
Finland f1nch 
I think we need to look at this aspect differently. If these organizations are treated like "partners" like you said, it would give them exclusivity rights on the league and the players which is essentially a monopoly. If we want the scene to grow to its full potential, this requires massive funding which most esport organizations are not able to provide. If we wait for esport orgs to grow, it may occur at a rate too slow, and the scene could die because of disinterest. Also, esport orgs are going to be motivated to reinvest into leagues regardless of having exclusivity. It's still a chance to get their brand out there and win money from prize pool. Even if they do not get much from the prizepool, they still get their brand out there which in turn might make people loyal to their brand. Look at what Buyaka has done for LG. LG gained a massive Brazilian fan base, and so Buyaka got another Brazilian team after losing his to SK. This fan base has stayed. I don't think that having explicit exclusivity rights is good, but it would make logistical sense during the season. It could work if teams were forced to stick with the org during the season. Kind of getting away from what you said, but I'll make it concise. EL + orgs partnering is bad because it limits future opportunities; orgs will still be incentived to reinvest; this could allow for a pickup/dropoff time period for teams and orgs that would promote stability. Sorry for the wall of text xD
2016-08-02 22:58
We're getting into Riot and League of Legends territory, we're not in a game where there's only one organizer. You're right, that's monopoly, but that's not CS and it's never been CS. CS has always been about the open circuit, where different organizers have their say.
2016-08-02 23:12
#81
Aleksib | 
Finland Slyp3 
Orgs do not take any part of the prize money at tier 1 teams :D
2016-08-02 23:45
Fallen said in his stream that orgs take 10-20% of prize money.
2016-08-03 01:47
#113
Aleksib | 
Finland Slyp3 
Well maybe lg took lol. Shitty org it was But in europe orgs doesnt take any prize money
2016-08-03 10:03
It's not just brand recognition and prize-pool's. It's about the appearance of stability so non-endemics invest in the space. See the wild wild west of Dota, where this is seemingly discouraged unless you're a Russian oil tycoon. There's nothing wrong with exclusivity rights. In the past year, almost every North American team (including the .br's) has undergone an organisational change, except for C9, CLG, and Liquid. EL want to (openly) partner with the well-vetted and stable organisation's to bring non-endemics into the space. This also isn't the CGS or League of Legends. They've been quite cognisant of the open-circuit. It's just lacking some player protection clauses. I'm all for a different model of business, so long as they respect the space.
2016-08-03 00:11
#46
Aleksib | 
Finland f1nch 
I think this is a new era of CS and esports. I think it will continue to grow at a phenomenal rate.
2016-08-02 22:38
#47
f0rest | 
Serbia dankooo 
I read it key giveaway
2016-08-02 22:38
Good article. We appreciate that! xD
2016-08-02 22:52
#60
 | 
Poland Marcines 
I hate some things: 4;00 CEST games, monkey crowd and no replays or cameras or analysis desk on twitch when games was on TV
2016-08-02 22:53
just go to TV stream... I watched game there and has no problem...
2016-08-03 00:23
Wish I could have 1.13 rating when I'm slumping lol, but I'm shit.
2016-08-02 22:57
"Olof still not at 100%" I had to lol a little. Lets face it Fnatic is not the dominating force they used to be; and it is not just because Olof is not at 100%, other teams and players just upped their own game.
2016-08-02 23:16
+1
2016-08-03 09:35
#76
 | 
Brazil BuddyINSANE 
n1
2016-08-02 23:28
Ty for this awesome news post! Eventhough my number 1 sport to watch will always be football and things are done differently there, I think I agree with your that CS should be done the way it was done till now - it's about the players, not the organizations :P
2016-08-02 23:31
#82
shox | 
Germany rakFABI 
the event was really good and well managed, but i don't like they fly every team to the event every week this is stressfull for the players and by far good for the environment
2016-08-03 00:07
Fnatic had it's shining moments last year when they dominated the scene. It's now the reign of SK. Other teams like VP and Navi (perhaps if s1mple joins) will undoubtedly contend as well for that top spot, but Fnatic is not the powerhouse they once were.
2016-08-03 00:19
RIP Eleague Signed on for 2 seasons and betting (and all the viewers that watch solely for this purpose) is already banned. Should be hilarious to watch Season 2 get about half the viewership. [*]
2016-08-03 00:21
#91
 | 
Australia PARAFAL 
>only watching games for betting you are the cancer that kills cs
2016-08-03 00:47
#87
roman | 
Palestine ndr[o] 
very nice article Striker, especially the last three paragraphs!
2016-08-03 00:37
The twitchstream sucked. No replays. Commonly missing out on materials that the casters refered to, most famously Flusha slamming his mouse.
2016-08-03 00:41
#89
 | 
United States Styles_ez4c9 
maybe because it was an observer feed. lmfao
2016-08-03 00:46
Uhhhh duh? (lmfao) Why cant we just see the normal stream? Why show us the observer feed?
2016-08-03 00:47
because TBS wanted u watching their stream as opposed to twitch in order boost viewership. Hence the difference in streams
2016-08-03 03:14
And why do they want to boost viewwership? Money. Ads. Lots of viewers=they can sell expensive adspots. Most viewers are on Twitch.
2016-08-03 15:14
This is why csgo needs an offseason like other sports. This is where contracts end and are renewed. Spots should still be held by team organizers like other sports. Only trading 1 or 2 players during the season is allowed. Dropped your whole roster is only available during offseason.
2016-08-03 00:53
Lol csgo>NHL
2016-08-03 02:22
what ive learned is that Sk Gaming is the best and most dominant team and that coldzera is the best player, until politics and backstage conspiracies forced them out of the event they surely would have dominated, instead we end up with fucking vp beating a lackluster fnatic. I guess its good for the scene to make the perrceptions that SK is not the most dominant team in the world, just sad that we do not have the clearly best team in such a league despite making no aka zero (0) roster changes, maybe they wanted to make it "more interesting" instead they failed miserably both in stream numbers and broadcasting hour ratings hopefully they will learn from their mistakes
2016-08-03 04:24
#106
 | 
Hong Kong SHiFT^up 
nice article, summarizes the major issues with EL well. n1 striker
2016-08-03 06:12
Virtus.pro still has "it" Remember that guys. *But only on lan :P
2016-08-03 08:59
#110
 | 
Turkey CHAMPTZ 
CSGO + TV = 21?
2016-08-03 09:12
#118
 | 
Portugal Aderitus 
Amazing analisys. Greate article and work! Definitely agree with most of it.
2016-08-03 17:18
I completely agree with everything stated and I would add that the crowd was so bad. So many times the crowd wasn't even half full, there were no cheers, no emotions. It really felt like empty games imo.
2016-08-03 21:11
i hate ELEAGUE. 10 weeks make a man cancer
2016-08-03 22:21
Good article and I agree CS is not in a place where orgs should have spots instead of the rosters. This would would well in an environment where there is league exclusivity and the teams were not participating in other events or at the very least a universal off season that all contracts were timed around, but with contracts ending at any time during the year and not being set around a single league or tournament it will not work. Their rules are even too strict about single player changes. If a team dropped a player and signed another they would not be able to compete with that player unless he was already a sub. Perhaps if they shortened the tournament to a couple weeks this wouldn't be as large of a problem
2016-08-05 02:46
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