Developing in isolation: The story of Australian CS:GO

Professeur
August 18th, 2018 19:00

Every Counter-Strike scene develops in its own way. But being so far away from any other region results in unique difficulties and makes Australian CS worthy of a deeper look.

A flight from Sydney to Los Angeles lasts about 14 hours. Flying from Australia to Europe takes upwards of 20 hours, and, depending on the final destination, can easily take close to thirty. Yes, everyone knows that Australia is far away from "the west", but the country is also so huge that internal flights can last over four hours. The size of Australia caused troubles back in the day of CS 1.6 and Source, resulting in each state having its own scene — due to ping issues and the costs of attending LANs on the other side of the country.

As internet improved, state-based teams and qualifiers got out of fashion, and New Zealanders were able to join the scene, fully integrating and accepting the 'Australian CS' tag. A sense of locality lingered, but only for a bit, as the scene started to become homogeneous.

This brings us to the beginning of CS:GO, my starting point as I delve into Counter-Strike Down Under.

You gotta get out, go far away

"We went to Jönköping, Sweden, which people don't really know, but is in the middle of nowhere, and we were staying in a farmhouse that was an hour away from the venue. We had to hire a car and drive an hour back and forth every day to go to this event. We hired PCs in Jönköping because you had to play in the BYOC, and the owner of our team thought it would be a good experience for us, so he put is in the main hall of DreamHack Winter. And I don't know if people at home know this, but the main hall of DreamHack Winter is... a rave. We couldn't hear each other during matches because it was so loud, people were standing up on their desks, raving on... it was mental." - Chad "SPUNJ" Burchill about his DreamHack Winter 2013 BYOC experience.

A short outtake from a conversation with SPUNJ, who recalled his first European CS:GO event, is enough to grasp how different the scene was just five years ago. Even the best of the best at the time, NiP and VeryGames, didn't have anything near what is considered standard now: generous salaries, five-star hotels, tournament organizer-covered flights and 24/7 available practice rooms. Below the elite were dozens of European and North American teams that were playing for no salary, but at least they got a chance to compete against the best through open leagues, cups, and qualifiers. However, if you were a team outside of the two main regions, there was practically no way to get into the competitive circuit.

Vox Eminor playing on laptops and 60Hz monitors at MSI Beat It!

MSI Beat It! was held in November of 2013 and was the first event that promised to pit top European teams against Asian ones, with one slot being reserved for Oceania as well. "The Australian scene was pretty small back then, there was maybe a LAN every six months and that was the thing you wanted to go to", Aaron "AZR" Ward remembers. "So when we got the announcement for the MSI Beat It! qualifier we were ecstatic, we knew we had to make it to that competition". And they — Vox Eminor comprising SPUNJ, AZR, Iain "SnypeR" Turner, Azad "topguN" Orami and Luke "Havoc" Patondid make it, and then impressed at the tournament in China by outclassing Asian opposition, placing fourth and only losing to respectable European sides: VeryGames, fnatic and SK.

With no invites to tournaments or upcoming qualifiers in sight, Vox Eminor's result at MSI Beat It! would've meant nothing in the long term, but the team's owner, Talnoy, was confident enough in the team to go for the massive risk. He gathered the funds and sent the team to the BYOC qualifier for the first CS:GO Major, DreamHack Winter 2013. So just a week after they had been in China, a team consisting of a student, three blue-collar workers, and an IT professional, was off to Sweden to fight for a spot at the biggest CS:GO event yet.

Hall D at DreamHack Winter, where Vox played the BYOC qualifier for the first Major

Even though they weren't able to claim one of the two spots leading to the Major, as they lost to Xapso in the quarter-finals of the BYOC, Vox Eminor's top-eight finish, combined with the top four at MSI, saw them accomplish something perhaps even greater: putting Australia on the map. Starting with the next Major, EMS One Katowice 2014, Australia had a pathway into the Major circuit, something for which regions such as South America and Asia had to wait another year.

"I know that Valve wanted to make Counter-Strike as global as possible, so us being put on the radar I think was a good target for them, a demographic from that region. And we were the best team from that region, we had beaten all of the Asian teams at MSI Beat It. I think that is why we were considered. At one point we also got to meet the Valve employees, talk to them, help them test the servers and stuff, we had a really good rapport and relationship, and we were also entertaining, which I think helped our case as well." - SPUNJ

The team and manager GoMeZ at the second CS:GO Major, EMS One Katowice 2014

Vox Eminor attended the Katowice 2014 Major as an invited team and earned a spot through the Oceanic qualifier at the following one, which took place in Cologne, but SPUNJ and co. didn't blow anyone's mind with their displays at the Majors that year, finishing 13-16th both times. The way these tournaments were set up back then saw Vox Eminor play just four maps against international opposition, which isn't enough for a team to improve significantly. It was, however, enough to give them an edge back home, something they didn't want to give away easily.

"There are a couple of factors to consider, especially with CS at the time. All Australian teams were playing for one spot at international events and our team had the most experience. Teams would be upset that we wouldn't practice them, but we didn't feel the need to practice them because we would beat them whenever we played them. We didn't want to give away anything that we learned, we didn't want to give them any advantages when we knew that we had to play them, a lot of the time in online qualifiers, for one spot at a LAN. We wanted to make sure we were ahead of the curve in that regard." - SPUNJ

That approach worked for some time, as Vox Eminor established themselves as the best Australian team and got invited to the LAN qualifier for ESL One Katowice 2015, from which they made it to their third Major. The Aussies managed a Major victory this time around to finish 9-12th, but what won over the hearts of a lot of fans were the POV+TeamSpeak VODs of the matches they played. They stood out with their fired up, sometimes even cocky attitude, but at the same time they were laid-back and lighthearted — a weird combination not unique to the Vox Eminor squad, but shared among many Australian players who have followed in their footsteps.

Throughout 2014, Vox Eminor overshadowed their direct domestic rival Immunity, a team created by former Vox member SnypeR after he was replaced by rising star Justin "jks" Savage. But things started to change after Katowice 2015. Despite Vox Eminor picking up Immunity's standout player Yaman "yam" Ergenekon to replace topguN, the underdogs managed to beat out SPUNJ's team in the first intercontinental league that had an Oceanic division — FACEIT League Stage 1 — and qualify for an overseas event. In the end, Immunity managed to tie three events together in their first Euro trip, attending the DreamHack Tours 2015 BYOC and Gfinity Summer Masters as well. The results weren't impressive, but the experience gained was massive, especially for the likes of Ricardo "Rickeh" Mulholland and Karlo "USTILO" Pivac.

After parting ways with Vox, SnypeR assembled Immunity, the second Australian team to attend an overseas event

I had a dream, Joe

Despite the likes of FACEIT, Gfinity and Counter Pit taking note of Oceania and offering avenues for teams from the region to get to more overseas LANs, in the first half of 2015 Vox Eminor was set on leaving their home country, with a limiting practice environment one of the main reasons. An impressive run at Gfinity Spring Masters 2, where they beat Liquid 2-0 and played out 1-1 stalemates with fnatic and NiP, raised some eyebrows:

"Originally, we got an offer from Liquid and we were getting really close to signing with them, but then MonteCristo from Renegades came out of nowhere and he was like: "Boys, I want you - here's the money". So we went with Renegades, that was our first pro team." - AZR

With exquisite clutching, jks quickly established himself as the best Aussie player, holding the title to this day

Making their new home North America was something that came naturally, as it suited both them and any organization that would want to sign them. But even though it was the logical move, the decision was not one made easily. The cultural change is significant, as is the duration of the flight that separates players from families back home.

"We wanted to chase the dream of being professional CS players, and to do that we had to make big sacrifices. If you ask any of the players on that team now if they would rather live in the USA or in their beautiful home country of Australia, with sunny beaches and beautiful weather every day of the week, they would 110% pick Australia, without a doubt. That's just a sacrifice we made." - SPUNJ

Moving to USA and playing professionally was the dream, but it wasn't all roses for Renegades

With Vox Eminor becoming Renegades and departing Australia, Immunity, who had already started beating SPUNJ and co., became the no. 1 team in the country. In 2015, SnypeR's crew went on to attend their first Major, ESL One Cologne 2015, played the LAN qualifier for DreamHack Cluj-Napoca, and impressed at the first international tournament held in Australia — Crown Invitational. Immunity beat Renegades and Cloud9 at that event, placing second to Virtus.pro.

Things were looking up for Immunity towards the end of 2015, their tactical, structured style was working out, only for the team to dissolve six months into the next year. It started unraveling in January when the team was upset by Chiefs in the Oceanic Minor Qualifier. "We had got so tunnel-visioned on beating Europeans and North Americans", SnypeR admits. "When it came to versing everyone else in Australia we thought we would just win". After that, he says, the team put in more time in preparation for domestic opponents, which paid off as they qualified for Counter Pit Season 2, but the squad still decided to move him to a coaching position and find a new player before the LAN event.

"Everyone seems to have this problem with the way I was in-game-leading, even though we would constantly win, yam and JAMES wanted to take over calling in Immunity. But you got to remember that this was during the fnatic era, fnatic and EnVyUs are just going around and doing two-man pug strats, so the team had this ethos, 'Can we stop playing so structured, it's actually hurting us? Can we start pugging a bit because we are the best in Australia?'. I didn't really want to do that." - SnypeR

The idea of coaching Immunity didn't appeal to SnypeR, who slowly pulled out of the competitive scene. That left both his team and the Australian scene without a classic, tactical in-game-leader, something it would end up not having for years to come, with a simplistic approach being the way to go instead. Unfortunately for Immunity, shortly after they had parted ways with SnypeR, USTILO got the kind of offer one can't refuse from Renegades, leaving the team with just three players.

USTILO and yam made their way to Renegades through Immunity

The holes on Immunity's roster were filled by Mohammed "MoeycQ" Tizani and Ryan "zewsy" Palmer, but the team didn't stick around for long. "Pretty much the whole way through Immunity we were a farming academy for Renegades", Chris "emagine" Rowlands, who saw a number of his teammates leave, recalls. "As soon as Renegades became unhappy with a player on their team, they straight went to our team and picked someone up". The vicious cycle repeated itself again and again, and there was little Immunity, a team with no salary, stuck in Australia, could do to stop it. The only option they saw was to follow in Renegades' footsteps and make a team that would move to North America.

"When Winterfox came about it was me, zewsy and ofnu who were part of the Immunity core, I think the last tournament we went to was WCA 2016, and then our contracts expired. We joined forces with dexter and we were recommended to get ap0c as well. Then we just approached a bunch of North American organizations. Our logic was - if we get to NA, maybe we won't have this cyclic thing with the team, maybe we can make a standalone team that won't get poached consistently. Winterfox was interested and we were happy to go over. That was our first salaried team, so it was a big deal." - emagine

emagine, currently the IGL of ORDER, spent a year in North America with Winterfox

By the second half of 2016, ten of Oceania's best players left the region for greener pastures and four of the original Vox Eminor members — topguN, Havoc, SnypeR and SPUNJ — had retired.

I have no voice if I don't speak my mind

In a short period of time, Australia was left without a good portion of its Counter-Strike talent, but it wasn't the first time it had happened. As Global Offensive was taking over from CS 1.6 and Source, a number of big names with international experience didn't make the switch, didn't stay to pass on the knowledge. SPUNJ noted Australia's three most influential cores from the old versions of the game:

"The first one has to be Function Zer0, as you move a little bit forward, maybe towards the tail end of 1.6, everyone was looking towards team Immunity with BenoR, gazR, those kinds of guys. And then you have to look towards the Source stuff and credit guys like Boomser, Tegs, TopguN , they were my teammates when I was in CGS." - SPUNJ

Having guidance of veterans who had played at international events such as ESWC, WCG and CGS would've been valuable to the new wave of players in Global Offensive, as it had been to a young SPUNJ breaking out in CGS: "Boomser was my IGL when I was in Sydney Underground, and in terms of being a character in the scene, he was always a very big personality. He was a winner, he was bringing the Ws, but what I learned for him is that there is more to it than just playing the game".

SPUNJ gave a fiery interview at iBUYPOWER Cup 2015 after heavy criticism towards the team's performance

With the majority of the veterans no longer around (the likes of Fergus "ferg" Stephenson and Mark "deStiny" Kagan being the exceptions) and a crop of talented players out of the picture, the competition in Australia was at a low point in the second half of 2016. The scene had come to a point where there was no obvious big dog but a bunch of young, hungry teams vying for titles. The growth in terms of tournaments continued, though, as ESL became more involved in the region. Basing their operations in Sydney, where a broadcasting studio with capabilities to host LAN finals was built, ESL Australia was pushing the envelope with products such as the ESL AU&NZ Championship and the ZEN League. The latter event didn't live up to the ambitious plan fully but was still a significant step in bringing together the Australian and Asian scenes.

Christopher "dexter" Nong, who was the first Winterfox player to return to Australia, noticed that ESL had upped the game in terms of hospitality, flights, and accommodation, making it easier for the players: "It was more professional, and it felt like players responded by being more professional as well. It all grew up from there," he said.

Making the most out of the lack of top players in Australia were Athletico, who were considered the best team in the country in the second part of 2016, with a new Immunity lineup and Chiefs being the main challengers.

Bring it on home

The announcement of IEM Sydney in March 2017 made waves throughout the scene as it would be the first premier CS event to take place in Australia, and it also had a slot for a domestic team. That prompted local organizations such as Chiefs and Tainted Minds — who picked up Athletico — to raise the bar and secure salaries for their players, starting a new phase for Australian CS:GO. Having an IEM held in Australia opened up new sponsorship opportunities, but it was also the overflow of money from OPL, the Oceanic League of Legends league, that allowed multi-gaming organizations to support their CS:GO squads more.

Having a tournament such as IEM Sydney hosted in their country was massive for the Australian scene

Athletico went into the IEM Sydney qualifier as favorites, but Chiefs were able to upset them in the final and secure the LAN spot. The core of Chiefs had been together for 10 months, but they were fresh off a roster change, and the leadership had switched to the divisive Tyler "tucks" Reilly, whose eligibility to play was confirmed shortly before the qualifier, as ESL revisited its VAC ban rules. "Randomly, one day, they said that when it's two years past your VAC ban you are fine" tucks said while remembering the long and stressful back-and-forth conversations he had with ESL admins. "That is my career, ESL saved my career".

IEM Sydney took place in May, and there a dominating victory over the country's best team, Renegades, and a T-side comeback on Nuke against North (ranked 5th in the world at the time) got Chiefs to the brink of playoffs and earned them a number of new fans, but, more importantly, showed that Australian teams, even ones with limited international experience, could compete: "We realized we could be better. I know that last year, all of the players on our team realized we can beat these international teams", the team's in-game-leader recalls.

What tucks accomplished with Chiefs at IEM Sydney 2017 was inspiring

He is not a caller by vocation, but that didn't stop tucks from providing guidance at a time when there were few veteran figures to look up to, bringing up a new crop of players — who have since been picked off by other teams higher in the food chain. On the surface, his path is reminiscent of those of Nicolai "HUNDEN" Petersen and Andrey "B1ad3" Gorodenskiy; however, stylistically, tucks is not a low-fragging, highly-tactical in-game-leader. Despite his young age and limited tenure in CS, tucks oozes confidence in a classic Aussie manner, and he leads by example. A better parallel to be drawn is to someone like Joshua "steel" Nissan — he is also forced into the position of a nurturer by an inability to play in the Major cycle.

"The best players always bring their players up because they show them how to play. That's what I did with malta, INS, aliStair, I brought them all up because they saw me play and I could teach them. That's what all the best players do. Every single best player of any sport any game, they all do that.

"I only do it because I have a VAC ban so I can't play with the absolute best. If I didn't have a VAC ban, I would dominate everyone." - tucks

That Chiefs team took the mantle from Tainted Minds and was the best team in the country moving onwards from IEM Sydney, which earned them outings at international events such as IeSF 2017 and WEGL 2017. Their status would get contested later in the year, though, as more teams established themselves in Australia and also got chances to go overseas and learn.

Storm clouds are closing in

When the Winterfox project came to an end in May 2017 due to internal issues and problems with the organization, the players had no other option but to return to Australia. emagine and co. played out almost two seasons of ESL Pro League in North America and attended one LAN, Northern Arena, with the experience and talent they brought back being a strong foundation to build a healthy competitive environment in Australia.

Talking about what they improved on during their stay in Chicago, dexter says: "It was probably the learning aspect of how to treat people and be a leader", stating that the overseas experience mostly helped them develop out-of-game skills: "The qualities I gained weren't even connected to CS that much, I mean you learn a bit about CS, but it was more about leadership qualities, minor details, working with people in general, people with different mindsets". tucks, who currently plays with one of the former Winterfox members, credited the NA trip for building a strong work ethic, something zewsy seconded, even though he stressed that the new location was not the difference maker. "It was just the fact that I was able to play full time and be held a lot more accountable for my actions," he explained.

After developing out-of-game skills during his NA stay, dexter became an IGL and now calls the shots for Grayhound

Upon return, the ex-Winterfox members would disperse into different teams, and by the time qualifiers for IEM Sydney 2018 came around, the same had happened to the Chiefs 2017 roster. New talent rose through the ranks as well, which resulted in Australia having four competitive and salaried teams, each able to shine in the ever-growing number of qualifiers for international events: Tainted Minds, Chiefs, Grayhound and ORDER. Interestingly enough, all four teams are now led by the former Winterfox members — Chris "ofnu" Hanley leads Tainted Minds, Mike "ap0c" Aliferis does it for Chiefs, dexter calls for Grayhound, and emagine for ORDER. The North American trip seemingly resulted in a new wave of Australian in-game leaders, something that plays a crucial role in the development of any scene. Still, emagine is skeptical about the impact of the players' return, claiming that the growth could've also come from within:

"I think the Australian scene is independent of other scenes and independent of the players who have come and gone. I think that, even if we had not come back, the Australian scene would still be seeing its growth. I think the growth comes more from money being injected into the scene, full-time resources coming on, people playing more, being able to play full time — rather than bringing experience back." - emagine

Everything lined up in the second half of 2017, creating a perfect storm for Australian CS. On the players' side, Chiefs' IEM Sydney 2017 performance started a mentality shift, everyone started getting more international experience, a competitive top four meant no one could rest on their laurels, and the ex-Winterfox players' return brought home a new level of dedication. Tournament organizers secured better conditions for players and increased the number of international qualifiers. Lastly, teams were able to secure more funds and pay out significant salaries to the players, allowing them to play CS full time.

erkaSt, hailing from Mongolia, integrated into the Australian scene after moving to the country to study

If only there could be another way to do this

The start of May 2018 also marked the beginning of the second edition of IEM Sydney, this time a 16-team event. Three of the Australian top four — Grayhound, ORDER and Chiefs — were at the tournament, ready to compete against the world's best. Coming in with poise and determination, the Australians surprised top teams expecting to run over the local representatives. "When we had gone to ROG Masters [at the end of 2017] and managed to beat TyLoo and Vega Squadron — which seemed impossible at the time —, it gave us new confidence in terms of just playing the game", dexter remembers. His squad, Grayhound, sent SK packing and was competitive against FaZe in the groups in Sydney, while the other Australians who made a mark, ORDER, would've taken out Cloud9 if not for a miraculous 1v4 clutch by William "RUSH" Wierzba at match point. Also worth noting is that all of those matches were BO3.

ORDER and Grayhound impressed by taking some of the biggest names in CS the distance, with players such as Jay "liazz" Tregillgas and Sean "Gratisfaction" Kaiwai raising eyebrows individually, but none of the Oceania-based teams managed to make it out of groups. It was Renegades, who made up for their poor showing from last year — when they were, admittedly, still figuring out their new roster — who secured the playoffs to play their first big arena match ever.

Aussies got to see their favorites on stage in 2018, and the match was worth the wait

Renegades squared off against mousesports on the stage, Noah "Nifty" Francis gained the status of an honorary Australian after his 50-bomb on Inferno and over 7,000 people in the Qudos Bank Arena were going wild for jks and co., who were within touching distance of the win, but fell honorably to the European side after overtime on the third map. Despite the loss, few left the arena unhappy, having witnessed such a historic and exciting match live.

But while the average Counter-Strike fan in Australia is an avid Renegades supporter, there is a bit of resentment towards the team among the Australian competitive scene. "I think it is justified, especially when they came back last year and lost", SnypeR says, trying to explain how teams Down Under were feeling: "Why do they get this amazing opportunity when they are not the best?"

Renegades have gone through many ups and downs since their move to North America, in 2015. The move wasn't easy, the organization was going through turmoil, and they chopped and changed their roster in hope for a solution. After SPUNJ decided to call it quits, they tried yam as the in-game leader, had Rickeh come in as a talented AWPer, brought over Nicholas "Peekay" Wise to coach before trying out an international option, Aleksandar "kassad" Trifunović, but a real breakthrough was still missing. The core of AZR, jks and USTILO has been competing abroad for years, Renegades has attended 40 LAN tournaments since 2015, but big results only came after they added foreign talent to their squad in the shape of Nifty and Keith "NAF" Markovic, who was later replaced with Joakim "jkaem" Myrbostad. The first international tournament (excluding Minors) they won was SL i-League Invitational Shanghai at the end of 2017, while their first big tournament playoff happened only in 2018, at StarSeries i-League S4. The team consistently finished top two at the Asia Minor, alongside TYLOO, but the last Major they actually made was ESL One Cologne 2015, at a time when winning the Asia qualifier was a direct ticket to the event as global qualifiers had not been introduced.

SPUNJ and team manager GoMeZ overlooking NAF at IEM Oakland 2017

And while Renegades have earned their place at international events through North American qualifiers, something no one can take away from them, and the majority of the invites they have received are not unmerited — only from time to time have there been Australian teams close to their level —, SPUNJ understands why some people back home could be upset:

"I know that when we moved away it left a massive void because any experience we were getting, we weren't giving back to the scene. In a way, still branding us as an Australian team and us competing at the Minors could be seen as unfair because of how that impacted the rest of the country. Now we were taking a spot from them while not even competing in their region. I could see why people were up in arms and critiquing us at the time, but I think that everybody has to look at it [from their own POV]. We wanted to chase the dream of being professional CS players, and to do that we had to make big sacrifices." - SPUNJ

Even though chasing the dream worked out fairly well for SPUNJ, as he successfully transitioned from playing to analysis and is now a standard piece of any big tournament broadcast, you can feel that the proud Australian in him still feels at fault for the scene not developing as much as it perhaps could: "I feel responsible for it in a way, which I hate. It's just a shame that we moved away".

What is stopping Renegades from coming back home now that there are more teams, tournaments, and qualifiers in Australia than ever? "[Low salaries] would be one big thing, but also, you can't really put a price on experience", says AZR, the only player still left from the squad that attended MSI Beat It! in 2013. when you are practicing these teams in NA and going to Europe to play other teams, that's a huge factor". The practice environment has improved a lot since 2015, but even now the top four teams rely on practicing overseas teams at bootcamps and events to make big improvements, and showing their hand while practicing local rivals is not an option because of how often they would meet in leagues and qualifiers. What makes it even harder to see AZR, jks and USTILO returning to their home country is the fact that two of their teammates are not Australian, and the same can be said about their current coach, Steve "Ryu" Rattacasa. Seeing that Renegades are a level or two above any team in Australia at the moment, their return would probably be a disruptive force to a scene that has just found stability, so having them continue their work abroad is probably the better option for all parties involved.

Despite having a few international players and being away for so long, Renegades are still the pride of Australia

Hold on to yourself

Most recently, Tainted Minds represented the region at the Asia Minor and placed third, but, in all honesty, didn't look like they were a serious threat to the established duo of TYLOO and Renegades, who took the two Asian Major Qualifier spots for the sixth time in a row. But out of the competitive top four of Australia, Grayhound are perhaps the team that looks the best overall. Ollie "Dickstacy" Tierney and co. had the best showing in Sydney, attended the EPL Finals in Dallas, beat out their rivals for a spot at DreamHack Masters Stockholm and just attended IEM Shanghai. The last event seemed like a great chance for them to make a breakthrough, as elite squads weren't present, but Grayhound went out with a whimper. Aim-wise, it seemed like they could take on the likes of TYLOO and Gambit, but late-round decisionmaking was an issue, perhaps due to a lack of experience or the pressure to perform.

INS was the only Tainted Minds player that transferred his online level to LAN at the Minor

Where does Australia go from here? Getting more overseas experience is key, says Joshua "INS" Potter: "I think we need more opportunities to verse the best, having just come from a bootcamp in Europe we learnt a lot about ourselves, individually and team-wise". His team, Tainted Minds, were bootcamping in Europe before the Minor and were headed to Malaysia shortly after returning from the event in London in order to play the DreamHack Masters Stockholm Asian Qualifier with a reasonable ping. The other two Australian teams that made the qualifier — ORDER and Grayhound — did the same, and the Aussie representatives reigned supreme over their Asian opponents.

It took a few months before kassad's impact was felt on Renegades' game

Traveling to bootcamps from Australia isn't cheap, and neither is importing coaches and players, but that is something SPUNJ feels could help teams reach the next level - "We can even start importing players from Asia to come down and play. It's happening already and it happened a lot throughout history in Australian CS". SnypeR has his own take on it, agreeing that going overseas to learn is the way forward, but suggests Aussie teams to get short-term, interim coaches: "What we need to do, if we are going to go overseas, is hire coaches of any kind, or intelligent players, who can lift our game instantly". Just having someone that understands the meta behind you for a week or two would help much more than doing big changes, the veteran thinks: "Someone like kassad coming in and restructuring your whole team is too much of a one step back - two steps forward kind of a thing".

Getting funding for all of that is the tricky part. It doesn't seem like the current flock of organizations can manage much more, as not many revenue streams are left to be exploited. Gfinity Elite Series Australia, a mainstream-focused project that bands together three popular esports — CS:GO, Rocket League and Street Fighter V — could open some new avenues, but SPUNJ is looking past his home country: "I think the key to people being able to make a living in professional gaming isn't through Australia, it's through South-East Asia and China." Bridging the gap between the two regions and having Chinese and Asian organizations pick up Australian squads would allow a team like Grayhound to reach the next level, especially if that makes them enticing enough to attract their rivals' standout players.

liazz's impressive numbers saw him scouted by a couple NA organization

An influx of money is also needed to prevent talent from leaving for greener pastures, as paychecks in Australia are nowhere near what is earned in Europe and North America. Rickeh is a player who established himself internationally and decided against returning home, plying his trade for CLG and Rogue, but losing someone like liazz, INS, or Gratisfaction can still be prevented. Uprooting whole teams and transferring them out of Oceania is an option, but the Renegades case showed that those moves have a negative impact on the scene back home if they end up being permanent ones, and with a larger number of international events to attend each year, it's no longer imperative to move out of the region.

Thanks to good showings, international opportunities have been increasing year-on-year
(*doesn't include NA-based RNG and WFX. Multiple AU teams at the same event are counted as multiple 'events attended')

Risks have been taken, sacrifices have been made made, and conditions are better than ever — the hard part has been done already. Australian Counter-Strike has strong foundations on which to develop further. Some hard tough decisions are still left to be made, but for the current generation, the most important thing is to simply play.

Australia Joshua 'INS' Potter
Joshua 'INS' Potter
Age:
19
Team:
Rating 1.0:
1.07
Maps played:
436
KPR:
0.74
DPR:
0.67
APR:
0.17
Australia Aaron 'AZR' Ward
Aaron 'AZR' Ward
Age:
25
Team:
Rating 1.0:
1.01
Maps played:
635
KPR:
0.71
DPR:
0.70
APR:
0.14
Australia Luke 'Havoc' Paton
Luke 'Havoc' Paton
Age:
28
Team:
Rating 1.0:
0.91
Maps played:
99
KPR:
0.63
DPR:
0.70
APR:
0.16
Australia Tyler 'tucks' Reilly
Tyler 'tucks' Reilly
Age:
22
Team:
Rating 1.0:
1.08
Maps played:
460
KPR:
0.73
DPR:
0.65
APR:
0.13
Australia Iain 'SnypeR' Turner
Iain 'SnypeR' Turner
Age:
32
Team:
No team
Rating 1.0:
0.87
Maps played:
149
KPR:
0.59
DPR:
0.69
APR:
0.14
Australia Chad 'SPUNJ' Burchill
Chad 'SPUNJ' Burchill
Age:
29
Team:
No team
Rating 1.0:
0.87
Maps played:
151
KPR:
0.62
DPR:
0.73
APR:
0.18
Australia Azad 'topguN' Orami
Azad 'topguN' Orami
Age:
30
Team:
Rating 1.0:
1.02
Maps played:
29
KPR:
0.67
DPR:
0.66
APR:
0.12
Australia Christopher 'dexter' Nong
Christopher 'dexter' Nong
Age:
24
Team:
Rating 1.0:
1.11
Maps played:
386
KPR:
0.76
DPR:
0.66
APR:
0.15
Australia Chris 'emagine' Rowlands
Chris 'emagine' Rowlands
Age:
27
Team:
Rating 1.0:
1.00
Maps played:
483
KPR:
0.68
DPR:
0.66
APR:
0.14
Australia Ricardo 'Rickeh' Mulholland
Ricardo 'Rickeh' Mulholland
Age:
26
Team:
Rating 1.0:
1.06
Maps played:
443
KPR:
0.71
DPR:
0.63
APR:
0.14
Norway Joakim 'jkaem' Myrbostad
Joakim 'jkaem' Myrbostad
Age:
24
Team:
Rating 1.0:
1.03
Maps played:
671
KPR:
0.72
DPR:
0.69
APR:
0.14
New Zealand Ryan 'zewsy' Palmer
Ryan 'zewsy' Palmer
Age:
21
Rating 1.0:
1.05
Maps played:
407
KPR:
0.72
DPR:
0.68
APR:
0.17
New Zealand Chris 'ofnu' Hanley
Chris 'ofnu' Hanley
Age:
25
Rating 1.0:
1.07
Maps played:
449
KPR:
0.73
DPR:
0.67
APR:
0.14
Australia Mohammed 'MoeycQ' Tizani
Mohammed 'MoeycQ' Tizani
Age:
25
Team:
Rating 1.0:
1.03
Maps played:
343
KPR:
0.71
DPR:
0.68
APR:
0.13
Australia Karlo 'USTILO' Pivac
Karlo 'USTILO' Pivac
Age:
25
Team:
Rating 1.0:
1.00
Maps played:
606
KPR:
0.69
DPR:
0.70
APR:
0.15
Australia Nicholas 'Peekay' Wise
Nicholas 'Peekay' Wise
Age:
-
Team:
Rating 1.0:
0.00
Maps played:
0
KPR:
0.00
DPR:
0.00
APR:
0.00
Australia Justin 'jks' Savage
Justin 'jks' Savage
Age:
22
Team:
Rating 1.0:
1.08
Maps played:
632
KPR:
0.72
DPR:
0.63
APR:
0.13
Canada Keith 'NAF' Markovic
Keith 'NAF' Markovic
Age:
20
Team:
Rating 1.0:
1.09
Maps played:
848
KPR:
0.74
DPR:
0.65
APR:
0.16
Australia Ollie 'Dickstacy' Tierney
Ollie 'Dickstacy' Tierney
Age:
21
Team:
Rating 1.0:
1.01
Maps played:
366
KPR:
0.68
DPR:
0.66
APR:
0.15
Canada Joshua 'steel' Nissan
Joshua 'steel' Nissan
Age:
28
Team:
Rating 1.0:
1.05
Maps played:
286
KPR:
0.73
DPR:
0.69
APR:
0.16
New Zealand Sean 'Gratisfaction' Kaiwai
Sean 'Gratisfaction' Kaiwai
Age:
22
Team:
Rating 1.0:
1.11
Maps played:
461
KPR:
0.73
DPR:
0.60
APR:
0.12
Australia Mike 'ap0c' Aliferis
Mike 'ap0c' Aliferis
Age:
31
Rating 1.0:
1.02
Maps played:
370
KPR:
0.72
DPR:
0.70
APR:
0.15
Ukraine Andrey 'B1ad3' Gorodenskiy
Andrey 'B1ad3' Gorodenskiy
Age:
31
Team:
No team
Rating 1.0:
0.83
Maps played:
899
KPR:
0.58
DPR:
0.73
APR:
0.16
Serbia Aleksandar 'kassad' Trifunović
Aleksandar 'kassad' Trifunović
Age:
31
Team:
No team
Rating 1.0:
0.75
Maps played:
98
KPR:
0.52
DPR:
0.73
APR:
0.14
United States Steve 'Ryu' Rattacasa
Steve 'Ryu' Rattacasa
Age:
33
Team:
No team
Rating 1.0:
0.87
Maps played:
6
KPR:
0.56
DPR:
0.64
APR:
0.12
Australia Jay 'liazz' Tregillgas
Jay 'liazz' Tregillgas
Age:
21
Team:
Rating 1.0:
1.21
Maps played:
473
KPR:
0.80
DPR:
0.60
APR:
0.17
United States Noah 'Nifty' Francis
Noah 'Nifty' Francis
Age:
20
Team:
Rating 1.0:
1.01
Maps played:
619
KPR:
0.68
DPR:
0.66
APR:
0.09
Australia Mark 'deStiny' Kagan
Mark 'deStiny' Kagan
Age:
27
Team:
Rating 1.0:
1.06
Maps played:
219
KPR:
0.75
DPR:
0.72
APR:
0.16
Australia Fergus 'ferg' Stephenson
Fergus 'ferg' Stephenson
Age:
30
Team:
No team
Rating 1.0:
0.76
Maps played:
87
KPR:
0.54
DPR:
0.75
APR:
0.17
Denmark Nicolai 'HUNDEN' Petersen
Nicolai 'HUNDEN' Petersen
Age:
27
Rating 1.0:
0.81
Maps played:
1146
KPR:
0.55
DPR:
0.70
APR:
0.15
Australia Yaman 'yam' Ergenekon
Yaman 'yam' Ergenekon
Age:
29
Team:
No team
Rating 1.0:
1.04
Maps played:
487
KPR:
0.70
DPR:
0.65
APR:
0.13
United States William 'RUSH' Wierzba
William 'RUSH' Wierzba
Age:
24
Team:
Rating 1.0:
1.03
Maps played:
835
KPR:
0.71
DPR:
0.67
APR:
0.16
au cs lul
2018-08-18 19:00
literally only 1 decent team lul
2018-08-18 19:01
#16
Dodz | 
Denmark KFB4 
0*
2018-08-18 19:03
#18
 | 
Austria shaakeh 
expected down under
2018-08-18 19:03
#49
 | 
United States Cherryyy 
GOD HUNDEN
2018-08-18 20:50
Cool Story Tell Again
2018-08-18 22:09
#76
 | 
Israel TheLoveGuy 
GOD HUNDEN
2018-08-18 23:20
Tucks cocky af .. "i would dominate" lul
2018-08-18 21:23
#104
 | 
World Damon1174 
At least we have more than one team LUL
2018-08-19 05:44
#15
xms | 
Reunion zizi1234 
spain cs lul
2018-08-18 19:02
#28
 | 
Portugal Fsgsh 
French scene LUL And dont say nothing about portugal scene! I dont have it..... YET
2018-08-18 19:27
#32
xms | 
Reunion zizi1234 
french scene 2 major, portugal scene 0, spain scene 0
2018-08-18 19:29
#62
 | 
Portugal Fsgsh 
There is no arguments against facts :/
2018-08-18 22:04
#74
 | 
United States dougtheduck 
stop living in 2015 and 2014
2018-08-18 23:17
#105
 | 
North America KiNGa_da_ACE 
He delivered a statement that is true in 2018
2018-08-19 05:57
#30
RUSH | 
United States ShawnM 
Australia CS > Spain CS
2018-08-18 19:29
#33
xms | 
Reunion zizi1234 
+1
2018-08-18 19:29
#70
Brazil dopU 
blyat
2018-08-18 22:39
#117
 | 
Australia weapon_ 
INDEED LOL.
2018-08-19 10:41
spain cs lmfao
2018-08-19 11:22
#147
 | 
Spain Kyuuta 
Actually Spain cs back in 1.6 was pretty decent, they won 2 majors and placed second against NiP. Spanish CSGO its aids tho.
2018-08-20 04:00
#150
 | 
Russia Scorceze 
Espana cs omegalul
2018-08-20 13:38
worst day of my life
2018-08-18 19:01
#31
RUSH | 
United States ShawnM 
Not first?????
2018-08-18 19:29
yes very sad
2018-08-18 22:17
#63
 | 
Portugal Fsgsh 
Aahahhahah You are a shit broooo MISSION FAILED :D
2018-08-18 22:06
:< mean
2018-08-18 22:17
#139
 | 
Portugal Fsgsh 
Bro doesnt matter if u failed your mission i still love you :) But i hate too ... just because u dont like mibr >.>
2018-08-19 19:48
tldr
2018-08-18 19:00
Also interested
2018-08-18 22:10
#106
 | 
North America KiNGa_da_ACE 
Australian scene has tried to be relevant for five years
2018-08-19 05:58
A lot longer then that maaate.
2018-08-24 03:38
#165
 | 
North America KiNGa_da_ACE 
In csgo**
2018-08-24 05:24
#4
fox | 
Norway narktastic 
tldr
2018-08-18 19:01
AU scene attending more events and doing better. Looking to bring in more overseas coaches and players - but its expensive.
2018-08-21 12:52
#6
 | 
Russia zovk 
Spunj gOd
2018-08-18 19:01
#7
 | 
Greece Poor_Noob 
WHAT IS THIS OMG WTF LMAO ROFLE LOL
2018-08-18 19:01
It's called a first world country, I don't expect you to have ever heard of such a thing.
2018-08-18 19:45
#38
 | 
Greece Poor_Noob 
sry :( i am greek no educated
2018-08-18 19:46
#71
pronax | 
Russia ShadTH 
>austria >first world country
2018-08-18 22:47
#79
 | 
United Kingdom Yuli 
Austria is not Australia
2018-08-19 00:31
#113
pronax | 
Russia ShadTH 
australia is eu country wtf brit
2018-08-19 08:48
#141
 | 
United Kingdom Yuli 
australia is oceania not european.
2018-08-19 21:24
#142
pronax | 
Russia ShadTH 
i'm baiting
2018-08-19 21:33
#166
 | 
North America KiNGa_da_ACE 
Lol you had to spell it out for him
2018-08-24 05:25
We all know Russia wouldn't know anything about being first world
2018-08-19 00:44
#126
 | 
Australia CaZeR01 
You arent very smart are you
2018-08-19 15:32
#8
 | 
Brazil Nimenz 
Great story, so many plot twists.
2018-08-18 19:01
Dickstacy
2018-08-18 19:01
arent think that
2018-08-18 19:01
#11
 | 
Brazil EWRO 
AU CS LUL
2018-08-18 19:01
#12
Jame | 
Israel altandi 
holy shit who cares
2018-08-18 19:02
#127
 | 
Australia CaZeR01 
Me :)
2018-08-19 15:32
#152
 | 
Australia WombatAU 
me :)
2018-08-20 17:23
Me :)
2018-08-24 03:39
I got finger tendinitis scrolling all the way til here =(
2018-08-18 19:02
Who cares?
2018-08-18 19:02
#17
 | 
Lithuania KoksSkirtumas 
Most rigged scene probably.
2018-08-18 19:03
China numba 1
2018-08-24 03:39
#19
 | 
Poland sHEEYmON 
lul tl;dr bcz who cares
2018-08-18 19:04
Ez4Nifty
2018-08-18 19:04
AU CS
2018-08-18 19:06
Nice read
2018-08-18 19:09
AU CS
2018-08-18 19:13
avstrian cs who caers
2018-08-18 19:22
Tldr
2018-08-18 19:24
Too long, but I read it
2018-08-18 19:25
#128
 | 
Australia CaZeR01 
Same lel
2018-08-19 15:33
Tbh worth it
2018-08-19 17:52
#27
 | 
Hungary Bonkheads 
tl:dr
2018-08-18 19:25
Interesting read, thanks <3
2018-08-18 19:27
Thanks for the aus rep
2018-08-18 19:37
lol 10 hours to read all this
2018-08-18 19:40
Thanks for taking the time to do this. Great read.
2018-08-18 19:44
#39
 | 
Brunei throw_officer 
matchfixers.
2018-08-18 19:48
Australia????? where is that?
2018-08-18 19:49
#129
 | 
Australia CaZeR01 
I forgot greece existed...
2018-08-19 15:33
Didnt greece disband a couple years ago?
2018-08-24 03:40
at least were always a country....not UK's leftovers..
2018-08-26 23:06
#41
SPUNJ | 
Australia Hythrex 
AU CS LUL
2018-08-18 19:53
#42
 | 
Ukraine Caffity 
I don't care
2018-08-18 19:59
#43
 | 
Poland TOOMUCH6969 
tldr
2018-08-18 20:00
ozzy ozzy osbourne oy oy oy
2018-08-18 20:04
Good read, I really like these articles. More!
2018-08-18 20:07
#46
 | 
Poland icelake 
austria cs who care
2018-08-18 20:16
#130
 | 
Australia CaZeR01 
I didnt know austria had a scene?
2018-08-19 15:35
time for shoey
2018-08-18 20:17
australia cs is fun imo
2018-08-18 20:30
#50
 | 
Denmark i_am_mental 
great read
2018-08-18 20:55
#51
NAF | 
United States Jammin800k 
Jks is soo underrated
2018-08-18 21:02
good article
2018-08-18 21:06
#53
Vietnam Oida 
"isolation" AKA the best AUS team automatically qualifies for EVERY MAJOR....
2018-08-18 21:11
AU cs OMEGALUL ' What tucks accomplished with Chiefs at IEM Sydney 2017 was inspiring ' too bad he cant compete at majors cause he's a cheater
2018-08-18 21:19
great article and flow of content it´s making the brake more tolerable
2018-08-18 21:23
#57
 | 
Spain JasonRacism 
Australia = Jks
2018-08-18 21:26
should of being developing down under
2018-08-18 21:59
Great article . YTB
2018-08-18 22:00
Right in New Zealand's feelings (;_;)
2018-08-18 22:01
title makes them look like they are an indigenous african tribe wtf
2018-08-18 22:18
Haha cool article! Thanks!
2018-08-18 22:33
#72
 | 
Brazil vinnyzeraNTC 
" but the country is also so huge that internal flights can last over four hours. The size of Australia caused troubles back in the day of CS 1.6 and Source, resulting in each state having its own scene — due to ping issues and the costs of attending LANs on the other side of the country." Own that's cute. Brazil is even bigger, people from the Northernmost states and cities play on Peruvian servers because they are closer to them than the actual Brazilian servers located in São Paulo. A flight from Porto Alegre to Manaus takes 7 hours and it has one stop, most of the times in Rio, São Paulo or Brasília. Brazil has 3 time zones normally and when daylight savings are on it increases to 4. Going from one region to another to play a LAN is also very expensive, and even more so here, due to acquisitive power of the Brazilian being less than that of the Australian. And where is the article about how Brazilian CS always managed to overcome that and became one of, if not the best, Counter Strike in the world? So sick of seeing articles about this spoiled kids who are born into wealthy in rich countries portrayed as "overcoming obstacles". Useless article, it looks like you guys are out of things to write about now in the middle of the player break.
2018-08-18 22:57
#87
Jame | 
Israel altandi 
+1 i would actually read an article about brazilian cs
2018-08-19 02:58
#92
 | 
Australia t0rrent 
Classic Brazilian need to always be centre of attention
2018-08-19 03:51
because no one wants to read about a shithole lul
2018-08-19 04:40
I think this is your all time low. I really hope you get banned so people dont have to read your stuff again.
2018-08-19 09:24
#151
 | 
Australia sini_ 
Don't hate, appreciate.
2018-08-20 16:16
Cool story, Brisbane to Perth is about 6 hours and people in cairns play on indonesian servers. Can't believe you wasted your time writing all that to try and make us feel sorry for you. Wasted effort, we already feel sorry for brazil.
2018-08-24 03:52
Good article guys
2018-08-18 22:57
Aussie CS lUl
2018-08-18 23:19
#77
 | 
Canada Trudeau 
Story of australian cs is failure at crucial moments also having 2/5 non aussie players on the best team
2018-08-19 00:02
Story of NA CS is bombing out in group stage, disbanding before any chemistry could be formed, and having qualifier spots being stolen by Brazilian and European teams
2018-08-19 08:27
#134
 | 
Canada Trudeau 
Liquid major final, optic eleague champions, cloud 9 major champions, renegades? Dreamhack open champions or something with 2 na players fuck outta here
2018-08-19 16:02
Liquid carried by s1mple from Ukraine, OpTic carried by mixwell from Spain, Cloud9 self-destruct in the most NA fashion ever (because all good NA teams can never last more than 6 months), Renegades are Australian and steal NA slots so that proves my point. >2 NA players Actually 1 NA player and one European player and the NA player is the worst player on the team and an Australian is the best player on the team
2018-08-20 02:55
#167
 | 
Canada Trudeau 
Naf and nifty > jaekem and nifty
2018-08-25 00:28
Make up your mind, do you want to be canadian or american
2018-08-24 03:53
#168
 | 
Canada Trudeau 
Both dual citizenship is a thing you mong
2018-08-25 00:28
#78
 | 
Brazil MarinhoLeo 
F
2018-08-19 00:19
good piece and renegades should go back to all aussie kick that nifty shitter and give jkaem a nice break up seeing he has actually helped
2018-08-19 02:18
#82
Slovenia god. 
nice article :)
2018-08-19 02:20
If liazz wants to play with the big boys he will have to take the blackpoison route. Pack your bags, bet on yourself and try and get scouted into a good NA team.
2018-08-19 02:29
#88
 | 
Spain JasonRacism 
-Ustilo +Liazz could be a possibility if Renegades don't do well at the major
2018-08-19 03:23
Yeah its possible but do you want to wait around for RNG to maybe remove someone and hope they want another AU player. Also I think it will take liazz sometime to get used to playing against EU/NA players/teams and the circuits nowdays mean there is very little practice only time. He would have to jump straight into league and tournament play which could fuck up his confidence. You need to build a young guy up, you dont want to throw him into the deep end instantly.
2018-08-19 03:36
#90
 | 
Spain JasonRacism 
Well when NAF left it was a mystery if Liazz could even perform against the best, So they went with the safe option in Jkaem and now Jkaem is the 2nd best player on Renegades after Jks, Since then Liazz has proved he can compete with the best, Carried ORDER hard going +27 in bo3 at IEM Sydney as the most classic example, He has been to a few international LAN events though mostly in NA so he wouldn't need much ''getting use to'' such period
2018-08-19 03:40
Liazz when he is comfortable and when he gets the spots he wants to play is a sick player, against AU teams or asian teams hes sick. But when hes out of his comfort zone, when hes not getting the spots he wants and playing a higher level of competition with different play styles than he is used to.... I just think its better for him to acclimatize first. He might start playing his best CS in a months time or it may even take him 6 months to build himself up to that level.
2018-08-19 03:51
New Zealand is not AU you fucking Danish fags. New Zealand is so much better in countless different ways. I could honestly go on for fucking days
2018-08-19 02:33
#91
Bewgz | 
Australia g00sey 
Then why do you guys keep coming here? At my last job 1/4 of the workers were kiwi ;)
2018-08-19 03:40
#94
 | 
Australia t0rrent 
You clearly can't count very high then
2018-08-19 03:53
Methven was cool, spent a week snowboarding Mt Hutt
2018-08-19 03:54
:( used to live in Chrisychurch real close to methven. Now I live in Queenstown
2018-08-30 05:27
#119
 | 
Australia .depuTy 
the fact sheeps assholes are tighter in the cold nz climate doesn't appeal to everyone
2018-08-19 10:47
#85
BASiC | 
Macedonia Gombos_N 
i liked vox. This shit now, not
2018-08-19 02:34
Did someone actually write that? lmao
2018-08-19 02:50
yes, and I think they were on meth
2018-08-19 03:59
#96
ZywOo | 
Switzerland S!TH 
H2K : ( liazz, Gratisfaction, dexter, Sico, Hatz ) +SPUNJ liazz = Passive Extremity ( Lurker ) Gratisfaction = Primary AWPer dexter = IGL & Support Sico = Hybrid ( Revenge Fragger & Secondary AWPer ) Hatz = Agressive Extremity ( Entry Fragger ) SPUNJ = Coach & Analyst > The best oceanian lineup, would totally dominate the whole Asian region, and moreover has enough skill to overcome Renegades and almost any other NA team. TOP10 material.
2018-08-19 03:58
#116
device | 
Australia DPRSHN 
nah u gotta have Dickstacey in there.
2018-08-19 10:10
#125
ZywOo | 
Switzerland S!TH 
Nah not the IGL of Grayhound, dexter is putting a never seen type of performance for the past 12 month while IGLing, emagine is not performing near as good as dexter despite being free of the burden of IGLing. Tbh i love the guy and his name would be the best sticker by far but imho no, dexter's a better player.
2018-08-19 15:03
#146
 | 
Australia Dadecum 
i think replace hatz with maybe ins, guy has great aim but tm are in a bad spot and he hasnt been able to shine like he should
2018-08-20 03:42
#148
ZywOo | 
Switzerland S!TH 
Hatz showed way more than INS, atm a better player in every way and on top of that his role perfectly fits, imo INS should be on the next team after the one i made, like a ORDER v2 once this roster goes NA or EU.
2018-08-20 10:54
interesting
2018-08-19 04:16
#99
 | 
Germany gigaTV0803 
Austrian cs lul
2018-08-19 04:32
#101
 | 
Other mikecool 
Keep playing, everyone!
2018-08-19 04:54
#102
 | 
Australia Dweg 
As an Aussie this was a great read. Hit me right in the feels.
2018-08-19 04:56
#132
 | 
Australia CaZeR01 
+1
2018-08-19 15:39
Good one HLTV!
2018-08-19 05:17
To much gaming is really dangerous for one`s social life!
2018-08-19 06:20
#108
jks | 
Australia Mosski 
cool
2018-08-19 06:23
Winterfox trush lol
2018-08-19 06:40
It's sad because at Global Challenge LANs, Australian teams have consistently been better than NA teams. I'm kinda jealous of that
2018-08-19 08:25
Dominic thiem best Austrian player
2018-08-19 08:28
That was a cool article, nice read
2018-08-19 09:45
massive artice for nobody will read it except AU players
2018-08-19 10:44
#121
 | 
Norway JorgyZ 
TL;DR Renegades is still tier 4
2018-08-19 11:26
#122
 | 
Brazil cadik 
AUSTRIA CS OMEGALUL
2018-08-19 11:27
#123
nukkye | 
Australia riotbz 
good read, thanks brother
2018-08-19 12:35
The article could be better
2018-08-19 14:12
Well written
2018-08-19 15:35
#133
 | 
Australia CaZeR01 
Took a good hour to read but all worth it
2018-08-19 15:40
"The best players always bring their players up because they show them how to play. That's what I did with malta, INS, aliStair, I brought them all up because they saw me play and I could teach them. That's what all the best players do. Every single best player of any sport any game, they all do that. "I only do it because I have a VAC ban so I can't play with the absolute best. If I didn't have a VAC ban, I would dominate everyone." - tucks wtf is he serious? xd
2018-08-19 16:31
#136
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France StickyRice 
Immunity <3, sad Renegades had so much power over the australian scene, much more money they could get the player they wanted in Immunity at any time. "I only do it because I have a VAC ban so I can't play with the absolute best. If I didn't have a VAC ban, I would dominate everyone." - tucks LOL delusional cheater retard xD
2018-08-19 17:48
hi
2018-08-20 11:58
#138
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Australia TotalEclipse 
Appreciate the article, thanks for the hard work!
2018-08-19 17:56
#140
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Brazil davidzor 
Very good article, congratz.
2018-08-19 20:27
very nice article
2018-08-20 02:59
#145
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United Kingdom Peath 
Interesting read. Love Havoc's beard.
2018-08-20 03:35
Au cs LUL
2018-08-20 20:52
Comprehensive coverage of what has traditionally been a relatively poorly covered part of the CS scene. More articles like this please.
2018-08-21 13:41
Good read
2018-08-21 13:56
#169
hzY | 
Nepal Avhy 
Nice story, I enjoyed reading.
2018-08-26 11:03
#170
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Norway na1ty 
SPUNj ;d
2018-08-26 18:41
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