The headlines of 2019: a mid-season recap

We have arrived at the halfway point of the season, which gives us a chance to look back at the first half of 2019 and reflect on its biggest stories as we turn the calendar from January to July.

January - MIBR and FaZe with changes

2018 came to an end and two struggling giants were one man short. Having just swapped Jake "Stewie2K" Yip for Epitacio "TACO" de Melo and Wilton "zews" Prado with Liquid at the end of the year, MIBR were in the process of returning to a fully Brazilian lineup following their gamble with the American members and Janko "YNk" Paunović, which had seen them stagnate and lack big titles. As the calendar turned to 2019, Gabriel "FalleN" Toledo's side revealed the return of João "felps" Vasconcellos, recreating SK's lineup which had won five titles in 2017.

FaZe, in the meantime, had just benched Finn "karrigan" Andersen in what was a much-anticipated move, as the Danish veteran had no longer been performing in-game leading duties ever since Nikola "NiKo" Kovač took over halfway through the FACEIT Major. It wasn't a leader that they found to fill the gap at the time, however; Dauren "AdreN" Kystaubayev joined up with the European side as a stand-in due to the imminent roster lock ahead of IEM Katowice for a period that ended up lasting until May, while YNk became the team's new coach.

IEM Katowice's roster lock on January 1 meant 2019 started with some changes

Liquid clinch first series victory over Astralis

While the Minors were going on in Poland, the first event of the year featuring a number of big teams took place across the big pond at iBUYPOWER Masters, including Astralis and the new Liquid with Stewie2K. The Danes had established themselves as a massive thorn in the North American team's side, holding a 10-0 record in series throughout 2018 against their previous lineup with TACO, but the new-look Liquid started their fresh slate with the first series win versus their long-time rivals in the grand final of the tournament.

February - mousesports break up after Minor debacle

As the Major cycle progressed, it was already beginning to take its toll on some of the teams who went out earlier than expected, and there is no better example than mousesports. The return of Martin "STYKO" Styk at the end of 2018 had done little to bring the European side back to title contention, but Chris "chrisJ" de Jong & co. still regularly competed for playoffs finishes until the new year came around with the Europe Minor.

There, as massive favorites to advance to IEM Katowice, mouz failed to pass the group stage after two losses to Valiance (now CR4ZY), which resulted in the team breaking up at the beginning of February. Initially, they were meant to rebuild around the star trio, Miikka "suNny" Kemppi, Robin "ropz" Kool, and Tomáš "oskar" Šťastný, but in the end only the Estonian stayed and chrisJ was brought back, creating a new lineup by combining young talent and veteran leadership with the addition of David "frozen" Čerňanský, Özgür "woxic" Eker, and karrigan.

StarLadder awarded their first Major

Halfway through IEM Katowice, the next cycle was announced, as one of the biggest and longest-standing organizers who had not yet hosted a Major, StarLadder, were given the go-ahead by Valve to organize the event in Berlin. The news marked the return of Majors to Germany, where such a tournament had last been held in 2016 with ESL One Cologne.

New ECS format announced

February also marked a continuation of a significant shift towards less online Counter-Strike between the top teams following ESL's move for a LAN regular season in Pro League. FACEIT responded with a revamp of the ECS format, moving away from a typical league setting to a series of five tournaments in the two regions and allowing the teams to pick and choose between them according to their schedules.

March - Astralis tie fnatic's Major records

IEM Katowice came to a close at the beginning of March, with Astralis becoming the third team to win back-to-back Major titles and only the second to win three Major titles overall, equalling the two records broken by fnatic in 2015. Even though the year began with the aforementioned iBUYPOWER Masters loss, Astralis proved why they were the best team in the world again, following up an incredibly dominant 2018 with a massive Major run in which they only lost one map in the group stage, beating a surprising opponent in ENCE in the grand final.

Astralis became the third team to win back-to-back Majors at IEM Katowice

New economy introduced

The third month of the year brought a huge gameplay update, addressing several crucial aspects of the game, which included a reversion of the AUG's price back to where it had been pre-discount back in late 2018 and an increase of magazine size for the M4A1-S, but most importantly a change of the economy, which had mostly remained untouched since CS:GO's beta beginnings. The update introduced a new way the loss bonus was calculated, with round wins only decreasing the bonus by one instead of resetting it completely. At the time, there was no cap on the loss count, which meant teams could stay at the $3,400 loss bonus despite winning a round beforehand, but in May a cap of five rounds was introduced.

Cache out, Vertigo in

Another crucial update followed at the end of the month with an Active Duty map pool change from Cache, which had been a part of it since ESL One Cologne 2014, to Vertigo. The new map was met with controversial opinions, with some condemning the map because of its uncommon layout and very quick pace and others welcoming the introduction of such a different environment.

April - Astralis complete a full year at the top

On April 23, Astralis became the first team to remain at No. 1 for an entire year ever since we introduced the global ranking in 2015, clinching the peak spot after their first triumph together at DreamHack Masters Marseille 2018 and staying there for the full 365 days — and more, as they kept that spot until late May.

Read more - A year at the summit: how Astralis wrote history

For their dominance during an entire year, over the course of which Astralis won both Majors, 10 out of 15 Big Events they attended, and an Intel Grand Slam, showcasing an unrivaled level of teamplay and individual form to earn such a status, the Danish powerhouse were touted as the best team to ever grace the game.

Na`Vi and FaZe pick up stray wins in Shanghai and Miami

Despite that feat, April went down as a short interim period between eras. Astralis were just beginning to fall off while Liquid had yet to start their fantastic run, and Natus Vincere and FaZe took advantage of that by picking up a win each at that month's Big Events. Aleksandr "s1mple" Kostyliev & co. clinched their first (and only) big title of the year in Shanghai, where their biggest rivals were conspicuously missing, and NiKo's side grabbed an unlikely victory in Miami over both Liquid and Astralis.

May - Na`Vi replace Edward with Boombl4

Another era of sorts ended in May, when Natus Vincere made their first lineup change in 18 months, with one of just two remaining members of the original 2009 Na`Vi squad, Ioann "Edward" Sukhariev, leaving the CIS giants to make room for new blood in Kirill "Boombl4" Mikhailov. For the first time in years, the Ukrainian veteran fell out of the best team in the region, joining up with Winstrike on loan with a new challenge ahead of him; to learn a new trait as an in-game leader.

The move came at a point when, after the Shanghai triumph, Natus Vincere didn't make it to the grand finals of two consecutive BLAST events in Miami and Madrid and ended the disappointing run of form with a huge failure in the regular season of ESL Pro League Season 9, losing favorable matchups to North and Heroic in the second group stage.

A lineup that stuck together for over 18 months was no more by the time May ended

ENCE end Astralis' Nuke streak, become the first Finnish team to win a Big Event in CS:GO

BLAST Pro Series Madrid should be remembered for its two massive storylines at that point of the CS:GO landscape. A Finnish team had never won a Big Event in all of CS:GO's seven-year history until then, but it was getting clear that if someone could do it, it would be the ENCE team that went on a huge upset run at IEM Katowice to make a final appearance at a Major and kept contending for deep finishes at the following tournaments.

The Spanish event was the one. Aleksi "allu" Jalli's team brought home a gold medal from Madrid after taking their revenge for the Katowice grand final with style, beating Astralis in the title decider and making another piece of history by ending their Nuke streak in dominant fashion at 31-0, denying the Danes a chance to tie the original NiP team's 32-0 record on the same map from the first year of CS:GO.

Valve set Major dates two years ahead

Valve made a huge step towards a more organized approach to scheduling and hosting the Majors, announcing the exact dates of the 2020 and 2021 tournaments sponsored by them to help organizers work around the biggest tournaments of the year and prevent further clashes from happening. After the scheduling of the FACEIT and especially StarLadder Majors, which happened on a period directly after the established player break in August, was met with much criticism, the next two years will see the Majors take place in May and November, closer towards the middle of each part of the season.

Liquid break big-event curse

One of May's Big Events, IEM Sydney, finally saw Liquid break the curse that had been haunting them for years, particularly in 2018 and in the beginning of 2019, when they lost eight big-event finals including two in which they were big favorites, to mousesports at ESL One New York last year and to FaZe at BLAST Pro Series Miami this year. That poor streak came to an end at the beginning of May in Australia, although not before the North American side went through an excruciating best-of-five grand final against fnatic in another favorable encounter.

June - Liquid become the first NA team at No. 1

Having broken the curse, more firsts followed for Liquid — literally. Winning IEM Sydney and DreamHack Masters Dallas, which Astralis as the No. 1 side at the time skipped, meant that Keith "NAF" Markovic & co. would become the first North American team to reach the coveted spot at the top of the ranking on June 3, immediately after the latter title run. The closest anyone from the region came to being considered the best team in the world before this iteration of Liquid was the Cloud9 team that won the ELEAGUE Major at the beginning of 2018, after which they briefly resided in the No. 2 spot.

Liquid's DreamHack Masters Dallas win pushed them to the top

AUG nerfed

The AUG saw a continuous increase in popularity ever since its price was reduced and once players got a taste for it, not even Valve's update from March that reverted its price back to the original $3,300 prevented the weapon's rise in usage, which tripled both M4s by June. Balancing the AUG further to combat its overwhelming defensive power, Valve reduced some of its base stats such as the rate of fire and unscoped accuracy.

The French rise

After a long stagnant period within the French scene dating back to early 2017 — the last time two French teams were in the top 10 at the same time before June 2019 —, the best teams from the country have returned to some of their former glory, with Vitality and G2 both enjoying some time in the spotlight at the halfway point of the year.

Led by Mathieu "ZywOo" Herbaut's incredible talent and sheer firepower, which has earned him three MVP medals in his rookie year already, the bees have won two top-tier events at cs_summit 4 and at ECS Season 7 Finals. Meanwhile, Kenny "kennyS" Schrub & co. made waves with a runners-up finish at ESL Pro League Season 9 Finals, where they took Nick "nitr0" Cannella's team to their limit in a tightly contested grand final featuring three overtimes.

Astralis suffer first group stage elimination outside of BLAST events

After Astralis lost their spot at No. 1, things began to spiral out of control for the team that had once been so dominant, with Lukas "gla1ve" Rossander's side suffering a big blow in the form of their first group stage elimination outside of BLAST events (where only two teams advance) at ECS Season 7 Finals. In London, they got stunned by the up-and-coming FURIA team, who beat the Danish squad twice en route to the playoffs.

July - Liquid win an uncontested Intel Grand Slam season

Liquid were quickly picking up speed in the meantime, adding to IEM Sydney and DreamHack Masters Dallas two more Grand Slam victories in a row at ESL Pro League Season 9 Finals and at the most competitive non-Major event of the year, ESL One Cologne, thus completing the second Intel Grand Slam Season uncontested within an unbelievable five months from its first tournament, IEM Katowice. The North American team went on to equal another one of Astralis's feats by winning six Big Events in a row later in July, with trophies at BLAST Pro Series Los Angeles and IEM Chicago capping off a fantastic first half of the season.

coldzera steps down from MIBR

As the first half of the year was drawing to a close, MIBR's fully-Brazilian dream was failing, with more changes in Lucas "LUCAS1" Teles replacing felps doing nothing to help the team get out of their rut, which saw them exit three tournaments in a row in the group stage. Meanwhile, their compatriots FURIA, who repeatedly denied the bigger organization a chance to steal one of their players, overtook them as the best team from the country with impressive results at DreamHack Masters Dallas and ECS Season 7 Finals.

Disappointed with the lack of improvement in MIBR, coldzera is looking for opportunities elsewhere

Marcelo "coldzera" David had grown disappointed enough with the lacklustre results and instability in MIBR that he requested to be benched so that he can look for a new challenge. The superstar's wish ended up being granted while the team chose to play the last tournaments of the season with zews, who will also play at the StarLadder Major.

daps builds a new Cloud9 roster

Throughout most of 2018 and 2019, Cloud9 were going through one long period of roster insecurity, changing the lineup nearly every month whether by choice or forces of nature, and the team deteriorated to a point where they didn't even make it past the first rounds of the Americas Minor North America closed qualifier in mid-June, losing series to New Identity and The Quest.

That was the last straw for the entire team, who disbanded after a last tournament together at ESL Pro League Season 9 Finals. Having been replaced by Peter "stanislaw" Jarguz in NRG, Damian "daps" Steele took it upon himself to create a completely new project, bringing together a former teammate of his in Oscar "mixwell" Cañellas, ex-Ghost's Kenneth "koosta" Suen and young talent Tyson "TenZ" Ngo, with the lineup then signed by Cloud9 and finalized with the only remaining member of the previous roster, Timothy "autimatic" Ta. The new-look C9 went on to play their first tournament after a short amount of time together, showing promise at BLAST Pro Series Los Angeles after placing fourth, beating FaZe and holding MIBR and NRG to draws.

What have been the biggest stories of the year so far for you? Let us know in the comments below.

Brazil Marcelo 'coldzera' David
Marcelo 'coldzera' David
Age:
24
Team:
No team
Rating 1.0:
1.20
Maps played:
1038
KPR:
0.80
DPR:
0.61
APR:
0.12
Brazil Epitacio 'TACO' de Melo
Epitacio 'TACO' de Melo
Age:
24
Team:
Rating 1.0:
0.94
Maps played:
940
KPR:
0.62
DPR:
0.64
APR:
0.12
Brazil João 'felps' Vasconcellos
João 'felps' Vasconcellos
Age:
22
Team:
Rating 1.0:
1.06
Maps played:
725
KPR:
0.75
DPR:
0.71
APR:
0.16
United States Nick 'nitr0' Cannella
Nick 'nitr0' Cannella
Age:
24
Team:
Rating 1.0:
1.02
Maps played:
1162
KPR:
0.69
DPR:
0.66
APR:
0.14
Bosnia and Herzegovina Nikola 'NiKo' Kovač
Nikola 'NiKo' Kovač
Age:
22
Team:
Rating 1.0:
1.17
Maps played:
1087
KPR:
0.81
DPR:
0.67
APR:
0.13
Czech Republic Tomáš 'oskar' Šťastný
Tomáš 'oskar' Šťastný
Age:
28
Team:
Rating 1.0:
1.13
Maps played:
974
KPR:
0.77
DPR:
0.65
APR:
0.11
United States Timothy 'autimatic' Ta
Timothy 'autimatic' Ta
Age:
22
Team:
Rating 1.0:
1.09
Maps played:
951
KPR:
0.75
DPR:
0.67
APR:
0.13
Estonia Robin 'ropz' Kool
Robin 'ropz' Kool
Age:
19
Team:
Rating 1.0:
1.09
Maps played:
581
KPR:
0.72
DPR:
0.62
APR:
0.11
Netherlands Chris 'chrisJ' de Jong
Chris 'chrisJ' de Jong
Age:
29
Team:
Rating 1.0:
1.04
Maps played:
1395
KPR:
0.70
DPR:
0.66
APR:
0.11
Denmark Finn 'karrigan' Andersen
Finn 'karrigan' Andersen
Age:
29
Team:
Rating 1.0:
0.94
Maps played:
1469
KPR:
0.64
DPR:
0.68
APR:
0.13
Spain Oscar 'mixwell' Cañellas
Oscar 'mixwell' Cañellas
Age:
23
Team:
Rating 1.0:
1.10
Maps played:
800
KPR:
0.75
DPR:
0.66
APR:
0.14
Serbia Janko 'YNk' Paunović
Janko 'YNk' Paunović
Age:
27
Team:
No team
Rating 1.0:
0.97
Maps played:
116
KPR:
0.67
DPR:
0.70
APR:
0.13
Finland Aleksi 'allu' Jalli
Aleksi 'allu' Jalli
Age:
27
Team:
Rating 1.0:
1.10
Maps played:
1360
KPR:
0.75
DPR:
0.64
APR:
0.11
Canada Peter 'stanislaw' Jarguz
Peter 'stanislaw' Jarguz
Age:
25
Team:
Rating 1.0:
0.99
Maps played:
934
KPR:
0.67
DPR:
0.66
APR:
0.15
Ukraine Aleksandr 's1mple' Kostyliev
Aleksandr 's1mple' Kostyliev
Age:
21
Rating 1.0:
1.23
Maps played:
1020
KPR:
0.85
DPR:
0.66
APR:
0.11
Russia Kirill 'Boombl4' Mikhailov
Kirill 'Boombl4' Mikhailov
Age:
20
Rating 1.0:
1.04
Maps played:
567
KPR:
0.72
DPR:
0.69
APR:
0.14
Canada Tyson 'TenZ' Ngo
Tyson 'TenZ' Ngo
Age:
18
Team:
Rating 1.0:
1.11
Maps played:
349
KPR:
0.77
DPR:
0.68
APR:
0.14
Canada Keith 'NAF' Markovic
Keith 'NAF' Markovic
Age:
21
Team:
Rating 1.0:
1.09
Maps played:
1096
KPR:
0.73
DPR:
0.64
APR:
0.16
Canada Damian 'daps' Steele
Damian 'daps' Steele
Age:
26
Team:
Rating 1.0:
0.87
Maps played:
870
KPR:
0.58
DPR:
0.66
APR:
0.15
Kazakhstan Dauren 'AdreN' Kystaubayev
Dauren 'AdreN' Kystaubayev
Age:
29
Team:
Rating 1.0:
1.02
Maps played:
1353
KPR:
0.70
DPR:
0.68
APR:
0.16
Brazil Wilton 'zews' Prado
Wilton 'zews' Prado
Age:
31
Team:
Rating 1.0:
0.81
Maps played:
137
KPR:
0.54
DPR:
0.68
APR:
0.13
United States Jake 'Stewie2K' Yip
Jake 'Stewie2K' Yip
Age:
21
Team:
Rating 1.0:
1.05
Maps played:
1060
KPR:
0.72
DPR:
0.68
APR:
0.14
United States Kenneth 'koosta' Suen
Kenneth 'koosta' Suen
Age:
23
Team:
Rating 1.0:
1.08
Maps played:
780
KPR:
0.73
DPR:
0.66
APR:
0.11
Ukraine Ioann 'Edward' Sukhariev
Ioann 'Edward' Sukhariev
Age:
31
Team:
Rating 1.0:
1.00
Maps played:
1414
KPR:
0.69
DPR:
0.67
APR:
0.13
Finland Miikka 'suNny' Kemppi
Miikka 'suNny' Kemppi
Age:
25
Team:
No team
Rating 1.0:
1.08
Maps played:
1016
KPR:
0.76
DPR:
0.69
APR:
0.15
Brazil Gabriel 'FalleN' Toledo
Gabriel 'FalleN' Toledo
Age:
28
Team:
Rating 1.0:
1.09
Maps played:
1102
KPR:
0.71
DPR:
0.60
APR:
0.11
Slovakia David 'frozen' Čerňanský
David 'frozen' Čerňanský
Age:
17
Team:
Rating 1.0:
1.17
Maps played:
658
KPR:
0.80
DPR:
0.66
APR:
0.14
Denmark Lukas 'gla1ve' Rossander
Lukas 'gla1ve' Rossander
Age:
24
Team:
Rating 1.0:
1.01
Maps played:
1186
KPR:
0.68
DPR:
0.65
APR:
0.17
France Mathieu 'ZywOo' Herbaut
Mathieu 'ZywOo' Herbaut
Age:
18
Team:
Rating 1.0:
1.31
Maps played:
485
KPR:
0.88
DPR:
0.63
APR:
0.13
Brazil Lucas 'LUCAS1' Teles
Lucas 'LUCAS1' Teles
Age:
24
Team:
Rating 1.0:
0.98
Maps played:
748
KPR:
0.67
DPR:
0.67
APR:
0.16
Slovakia Martin 'STYKO' Styk
Martin 'STYKO' Styk
Age:
23
Team:
Rating 1.0:
0.98
Maps played:
1009
KPR:
0.66
DPR:
0.66
APR:
0.14
Turkey Özgür 'woxic' Eker
Özgür 'woxic' Eker
Age:
20
Team:
Rating 1.0:
1.16
Maps played:
670
KPR:
0.77
DPR:
0.62
APR:
0.11
France Kenny 'kennyS' Schrub
Kenny 'kennyS' Schrub
Age:
24
Team:
Rating 1.0:
1.15
Maps played:
1521
KPR:
0.78
DPR:
0.63
APR:
0.11
#1
 | 
United States Sh00ze 
ez 4 nip
2019-08-10 21:29
Interesting year
2019-08-10 21:31
#9
 | 
Sweden Unluko 
Nice
2019-08-10 21:31
Who?
2019-08-10 22:49
2020 avangar top1
2019-08-10 21:39
#20
cR4zY | 
Myanmar xdcc 
best part of article: "mouz failed to pass the group stage after two losses to Valiance (now CR4ZY), which resulted in the team breaking up at the beginning of February." xaxaxaxa
2019-08-10 21:42
xaxaxaxaxaxaxaxa Or "lacklustre results and instability in MIBR"
2019-08-10 21:59
+1
2019-08-11 04:24
noice
2019-08-10 21:29
Ho in headlines
2019-08-10 21:30
#6
 | 
United States freakaroid 
What about NiP
2019-08-10 21:30
#17
nexa | 
Serbia FaZe_nexa 
What about them
2019-08-10 21:41
#44
 | 
Spain N0Love 
They beautiful people
2019-08-11 00:19
#8
 | 
Finland perkelemeister 
epic!
2019-08-10 21:31
Ex-OG winning DH Malmo ESL-One NY and being first
2019-08-10 21:31
Striker great job
2019-08-10 21:32
#12
STYKO | 
Norway AdNiB 
expected
2019-08-10 21:32
epic
2019-08-10 21:34
Shameful just from mentioning Astralis , they've done nothing in 2019 and they should just fear Liquid for the upcoming events. #Let'sGoLiquid #EUfangays #NAisTop1
2019-08-10 21:36
#19
flusha | 
United States k3ar 
1/8
2019-08-10 21:41
yeah, They online won Major and 1 blast event LOL xD
2019-08-10 21:43
#45
 | 
Spain N0Love 
What about a Major
2019-08-11 00:21
0/8
2019-08-11 03:58
#55
 | 
United States dabauss514 
Shit team until they win a major
2019-08-11 04:51
> Done nothing > Winning a major Pick one
2019-08-11 11:10
Nice!
2019-08-10 21:39
ez4GODStralis
2019-08-10 21:41
pretty good year already
2019-08-10 21:42
#23
 | 
Sweden Trkmag 
didn't read, scene bad atm
2019-08-10 21:43
flair checks out LUL
2019-08-10 21:48
#26
 | 
Sweden Trkmag 
??? Reply needs to have actual content
2019-08-10 21:49
U dont like scene because ur washed up team its not top 15
2019-08-10 21:50
#29
 | 
Sweden Trkmag 
No they have been shit for way longer than that, it's just facts that the scene is mediocre and first and foremost not entertaining at all
2019-08-10 21:51
oldfag spotted, now u are gonna say that in 1.6 and in 2014 the scene was better than now... desilusional nip fan
2019-08-10 21:52
#32
 | 
Sweden Trkmag 
''oldfag'' wtf is even that attempt at an insult lmao 2015 better 4sure
2019-08-10 21:53
espected from a desilusional oldfag
2019-08-10 21:54
#47
 | 
Spain N0Love 
2015 when I could count the amount of teams that were not shit with one hand. Nowadays the tier2 is playing really good CS and at the top Astralis last year and Liquid this one are playing the most dominant CS we've ever seen. But yeah I get it Sweden has seen better days in CS so lets say 2015 was better lmao
2019-08-11 00:26
#48
 | 
Sweden Trkmag 
Wtf? It's the opposite, I can count the teams that aren't shit today with one hand. 2015 had NV fnatic VP NiP NaVi TSM and LG were getting strong
2019-08-11 00:37
Heroic today would be a top3 team in 2015. The level and tactical depth has certainly become a lot better in 2019 than it was in 15. In 2015 there was a small tier1/2 and then a lot of totally shit teams. Today any team in the top15 can cause an upset on a good day.
2019-08-11 11:14
#62
 | 
Sweden Trkmag 
The tier 1 was strong 2015 but I agree that the tier 2 etc was bad back then. But Heroic would get destroyed by good 2015 teams, bad example. The most improved things from 2015 is small things like utility usage.
2019-08-11 17:37
Yes. And utility management/usage and good tactical depth would be enough for teams like Astralis (last year) and Liquid (this year) to easily dismantle fnatic, NiP, NV etc.
2019-08-12 12:03
#67
 | 
Sweden Trkmag 
Tactical depth existed back then. Astralis would obv beat nearly all teams, only fnatic could be a interesting and tight match, but Liquid are overrated as hell.
2019-08-12 14:51
Liquid break big tournament curse: may 2019. 3 months and americans already calling "the best era" xdddddd
2019-08-10 21:47
#27
 | 
Sweden Trkmag 
It's NA what do you expect
2019-08-10 21:50
+1 let them feel giddy about Liquid's current form
2019-08-11 03:59
#56
 | 
United States dabauss514 
Yeah it's a shit team until they win a major
2019-08-11 04:52
never said TL is a shit team
2019-08-11 05:00
#68
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Germany killmichi 
I wouldn't call it "the best era", yet. Still they show a level of dominance for now a few month that matches Astralis last year and no one else. And you guys really need to get over that major illusion. Majors nowadays are not more than decent tournaments. Tbh i expect Starladder to mess it up but lets be optimistic. To win you need one BO1 win, 4 BO3 wins and one BO5 afaik. Thats almost like cologne which was a hell of a tournament. So just say Astralis wouldnt have won a major in 2018? You think they would not have been Nr. 1 still? Just say Liquid does not win that major. Wouldn't you say that they were still the most dominant force of this year until now and probably even beyond. I just hate this onesided view some people have. It is not about that them majors anymore. Nowadays we've got so many good tournaments a year and only 2 Majors. In the begginings of CSGO there were less and worse tourneys and 3 Majors. Those had to be the colognes and Katowices of recent times (they actually were ESL tournaments most of the time). I am european btw.
2019-08-13 07:50
#70
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United States xxpowmanxx 
+1 imo majors need a rework, also people dont realize how much harder a grand slam is compared to other titles. Alot of analysts called it impossible and here we are bc astralis and liquid they had to make it harder.
2019-08-17 19:37
#72
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Germany killmichi 
+1
2019-08-20 07:22
#30
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Brazil Eletron 
MIBR Top 1 - 2020,2021
2019-08-10 21:51
LETSGOLIQUID
2019-08-10 21:54
#36
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Finland FakeHltv 
EZ4ENCE
2019-08-10 22:09
Who cares about some Cloud9 Lol
2019-08-10 22:19
#43
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Qatar PrisMcsgo 
I do
2019-08-11 00:16
#51
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Australia CaZeR01 
Me am
2019-08-11 02:37
#57
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United States dabauss514 
Salty that your scene is trash
2019-08-11 04:53
Idk man outside of liquid, Poland > NA Now this guys about to say something like “no major shit team”
2019-08-11 18:31
#64
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United States dabauss514 
"Outside of the #1 team in the world, poland > na" thats stupid logic
2019-08-11 20:37
#71
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United States xxpowmanxx 
Poland is not better than NA even outside of liquid though.
2019-08-17 19:40
very good year so far
2019-08-10 22:27
#40
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Portugal macpjoao 
Good article. 2019 has been a great year for CS. The tension for the Berlin major is huge.
2019-08-10 22:52
#41
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United States sh0ckwavemodz 
I think Gambit Youngsters and Sh1ro will be an article at some point :) they are doing amazing
2019-08-10 23:33
#42
KRIMZ | 
Romania moetxxx 
My biggest story is i get to a good university
2019-08-11 00:13
#46
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Belgium jorneiro 
Best story of 2019 is the formation of Gamerlegion, the future victors of both 2020 majors.
2019-08-11 00:24
#49
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Greece her-1g 
2021 new cs is announced
2019-08-11 00:42
what a year. in cs:go every month something happens
2019-08-11 02:28
#61
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Germany NSDAP 
cool
2019-08-11 12:50
#65
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United States ChrisBrown 
XD
2019-08-11 21:41
Are Astralis truely dead or is it only a smoke screen for the upcoming major????????????
2019-08-15 18:02
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