Edward: "After three consecutive tournament victories in 2018, we could have become the best team in the world, but we chose to hang out"

The Ukrainian veteran opens up about his career in the first part of an in-depth interview conducted by Alexey "⁠OverDrive⁠" Birukov for HLTV.org.

In the first of a two-part interview, Ioann "⁠Edward⁠" Sukhariev spoke about his early days in Counter-Strike 1.6 and shared stories about the living conditions in Virtus.pro, how NAVI was formed in 2009, and what the Ukrainian superteam did to dominate the world in the first year of their existence.

Edward opens up about his time in NAVI and the moves he has made in his 18-years-long career

The 32-year-old, who recently announced that he is open to offers from any region, also shared memories of the last eight years in CS:GO — during which he mostly competed with NAVI but also had a short stint in Astana Dragons in 2013 and a brief loan period with Winstrike last year — and of the many phases the legendary team went through in that time.

When did you start playing team-based CS?

From the very beginning. If you play well, guys who are older than you will notice you and invite you to join a team. The most honorable achievement was to win a local LAN and become part of the internet cafe's team. When you become the cafe's team, you're contending for the title of the best team in Kharkiv.

I needed around a year to get familiar with the game, and after that, I never really just played, I was always interested in competing. You could say my first serious team was pro100, which we assembled in 2002. Initially, we became the best team in Kharkiv, then the best in Ukraine, and, later, ascended to the level of the best teams in the CIS region.

What do you remember from the times on pro100?

It was a dream team. It's no coincidence they say your first love is the hardest to forget, and pro100 was just that. All of the emotions from my first big victories and losses I lived through alongside that team. At some point, two brothers who were part of the team, Keks and Razor, decided to get an education instead of playing, but our trio kept rolling. We were looking for guys who could pay for our train tickets to different cities to participate in local LANs and we travelled around the country with them to play at these tournaments. My first large victory was at a tournament called Interp Festival in 2002, which had all of the strongest teams in Ukraine.

When did you realize that you were a pro player?

It was when I agreed to move to Moscow to play for Virtus.pro. It was a pretty serious decision, especially considering that I left my family and my friends to move to another country and city to dedicate myself to a game.

What was your time in Virtus.pro like?

I was invited to join Virtus.pro on several occasions back in 2006 when I won against them at ASUS Cups, but I declined their offers. However, in 2007, when it had become apparent that pro100 would cease to exist, I decided to begin a new stage in my life. I won the ASUS Cup at the time while they experienced issues in their team, so they invited me. Initially, I transferred alone but later I asked the team to invite Zeus, and after some time had passed, Kane joined the team as well. The core of pro100 reunited in Virtus.pro.

What do you remember from that period of time?

It was a pretty rough period in terms of living conditions. Sometimes, I wanted to howl from sadness when I realized that I was living inside an internet cafe somewhere on the outskirts of Moscow. Our lives entirely revolved around CS. A positive moment was that at the time we had a contract with Intel, which meant that we had to visit eight cities in Russia to play showmatches. We travelled across the entirety of Russia and these trips were amazing. Sometimes, we were joined by a female team called Megapolis, and these trips were in the best traditions of student adventures. In the context of CS, we started emerging onto the international level and I started seeing myself as a player who was part of the international scene. A trip abroad with pro100 was an astonishing event, while with Virtus.pro we would travel somewhere every three months.

Virtus.pro (Zeus, Edward, LeX, ROMJkE, Sally) at Extreme Masters 2 in 2008

How did you join NAVI?

The three of us were kicked from Virtus.pro and we returned to Kharkiv. We were obviously upset, but, after a short break, we took on a couple of young guys and started playing again. It was difficult psychologically, as we had just been playing against the top teams in Europe, and now it seemed as if we had reverted a couple of years. We trained and participated at ASUS and DTS cups, but the results were average and the team started gradually dying. I remember how Kane stopped coming to training sessions and wouldn't pick up the phone. Through mutual friends we later found him in a poker club. He was at the table, sleep-deprived and hungry, and when he saw us, he said: 'Boys, I'm sorry, but I really need to win it back'. After that it became apparent that he was no longer as interested in CS, and seeing as he was the captain, we wouldn't be able to save the team.

I transferred to DTS and moved to Dnipropetrovsk, where I played with markeloff, pops, ANGE1, and Johnta. We had pretty good conditions and we travelled to DreamHack and GameGune events. Zeus was playing alongside ceh9 in pro100 in the meantime. At the time, there were four top teams in Ukraine, which contested for the title of the best team in the country, and each team could beat the other. These were A-gaming with B1ad3, pro100 with Zeus, KerchNET with lmbt, and DTS with me.

pops left DTS, and the financing of the team was tied to him, meaning that we lost our arrangement. We invited a young player into the team and renamed to "HellRaisers". At the end of the year, we won WCG Ukraine, where the top teams in the country participated, and we travelled to China to defend the honor of our country.

Later, Arbalet organized a LAN event in Sweden, where all four of the top Ukrainian teams were invited. There was the possibility that I wouldn't fly out to the event as I didn't have a visa. I accidentally put my passport in the washing machine, and the Czech embassy (we were supposed to fly via the Czech Republic) denied my passport. I found out that there was another embassy in Donetsk and made an appointment to see the consulate in two days. Upon arrival, I explained my situation and he told me to come back in two hours, which I did, only to be denied again. My team was practicing without me while I was travelling around the country in an attempt to get a visa. I decided to go directly to the Swedish embassy, bringing with me an A4 piece of paper that showed exactly where I'd be travelling to. HLTV sent me a letter for the embassy that said I could miss an international tournament if I didn't obtain a visa. I arrived at 6 AM, and despite getting in so early I was 30th in line and only got to the consul towards the evening. I showed him the document, explained the whole situation, and he ended up asking me: 'Do you know SK?'. I said: 'Of course I do', to which he replied: 'Great, come and pick your visa up in 40 minutes'. We ended up going to Sweden.

At the tournament, all of the Ukrainian teams ended up losing. We got a call from Arbalet, who offered to create the best team Ukraine could offer, with good conditions. Starix was given the task of assembling this roster. The team was assembled in Sweden and we laughed about the idea that Serega (starix) walked around like a baron, picking people for his team. He immediately picked up Marik (markeloff) and me. I proposed we signed Danya (Zeus) as a captain and we did it. We already knew that the manager of the team would be ZeroGravity. Even back then I knew that the manager would play a key role and that we needed a strong person who could rally a roster. I was happy we picked Sasha (ZeroGravity) specifically. The five of us then set out to find our last player and there were a lot of options, but we decided to make an offer to valentiniCh. I had replaced him on DTS back in the day. He had a good understanding of the game, good utility usage, and we thought he'd be a good fit. He thought about it and ended up declining as he was with A-gaming at the time. Zeus then proposed ceh9 as a candidate, he had played with him during his time on pro100, and we signed him.

What happened after you assembled?

The organization rented an apartment for us and paid us a good wage. All of it was a bit unbelievable for us. Prior to that moment we had never had such conditions, Arbalet created a fairy tale for us. We started training a lot, we lived the game. Some time later, we travelled to our first event, the IEM European finals, under the KerchNET tag, because the slot belonged to the organization. Despite us not being prepared on all maps, we immediately showed great results. We finished fifth, but that was enough to make the cut for the IEM Global Finals. Over the course of a whole month, we diligently prepared and returned to Germany for the finals, where we triumphed - our dream had come true. We finished first and I was the best player stats-wise for the event, I couldn't believe it. It wasn't even about the statistics but that as a team we were the best. After that victory, we knew exactly what we needed to do to become the unquestionable number one in the world. We could afford to play at a smaller event to expose our weaknesses in order to iron them out in time for events that we had our eyes on. It worked out just right, in that before WCG there was a small event that we lost, and this was right before ESWC [DreamHack Summer 2010]. As a result, if we account for the main events of 2010, we were undoubtedly the best team in the world.

NAVI became an almost instant success after they assembled in late 2009

What were your thoughts towards the end of the CS 1.6 era?

By that point we weren't the best team in the world, and a lot of the competition was on par with us. Despite some teams transferring to CS:GO, we continued participating in CS 1.6 events. We didn't believe right until the very end that everyone would transfer to the new version. We had played CS:GO once while we were in Sweden and we thought the game was a bit funny, but when the entire world transferred to CS:GO, we realised that we were late. The NiP era had begun.

Over the course of the next year, we just learned to play the game. I actually really liked the game, while markeloff and ceh9 really disliked it. It was difficult, but because we were a strong group, we managed to achieve a decent level and even won a few times. Then there was the fateful tournament in Prague where we lost to your (OverDrive's) mix, Nostalgie, and markeloff let us know that he was transferring to Astana Dragons right after it, and invited me along. I thought about it a lot, and initially I declined, but in the end I made the difficult decision to leave NAVI. We had a good roster in Astana Dragons, the organization rented out a flat for us and we started training, but I realized that it wasn't my thing. I was under the impression that everyone was playing for fun and no one wanted to work on improving their gameplay. Everyone was content and everyone was happy that such a team had been assembled. I tried to get everyone to work on teamplay, but in the end, the team seemed to feel that I didn't align with their views and I was kicked after around six months. We placed third at ESWC, and on my train journey home, lmbt, who was our manager at the time, called me to let me know that I had been kicked. Even though it turned out that things had been done behind my back, I had a feeling of relief. At the time, I travelled to the first Major in Sweden with you (OverDrive), where we weren't able to make it through the BYOC qualifiers, but I befriended GuardiaN, and the two of us joined NAVI later.

What do you remember after rejoining NAVI?

I remember how I experienced my first performance crisis in 2015, to a point where the team wanted to kick Zeus and me. Our manager, Ugin, did a lot to save our roster at the time. We had an open talk and after it, we saw improvement in our level of play. For the first time in our careers, we were playing in the final of a Major at DreamHack Cluj-Napoca, where we lost to EnVyUs. 2016 was a very good year for me. I managed to outlast the crisis and I really liked the way I was playing, but we weren't able to become the best team by the end of the year.

We once more made it to the finals of a Major [MLG Columbus], which we were supposed to win, but, in the end, we lost to Luminosity. That's when the Brazilian era started. After that, a pivotal moment was the team's decision to kick Zeus. On paper, it seemed that everything was fantastic, in that s1mple would come in and replace Zeus, who couldn't really be called a captain at the time as starix was calling as a coach. I agreed that Danya (Zeus) was dedicating less time to his gameplay and that he was more interested in his business projects, but with that said, I don't think that Zeus was a problem in our team. We were progressing and we needed just a little more time to become the best team in the world, but the younger players had other plans. They conspired with starix and made the decision without notifying me, Ugin, or Danya (Zeus). Practically right after the kick, Valve implemented the coaching rule and seized became the captain, but he was unable to cope with the role. s1mple's personality came through, and it inhibited everyone else on the team, bringing a lot of destruction. He compensates his toxicity with immense dedication to the game and a high level of play, so you have to decide whether you want to have the best player in the world on your team or a calm working environment. These days this isn't as pronounced as he has matured and become calmer. We played terribly at the time.

The team crumbled - first starix was removed and later so was seized. Essentially I was left with s1mple and flamie and we needed to decide what to do next. As the oldest person on the team, I assumed control alongside the organization's management. Danya (Zeus) and I always kept in touch, and even before PLG Major Krakow, which Gambit won, there was the possibility of him transferring back to NAVI. After they won, I forgot about the possibility of such a move and started looking for two additional members. In the end, Gambit experienced some issues and Zeus was transferred back. I could finally exhale as it really isn't an easy task to find a captain, especially at such a level. We decided to bring back seized on trial, but we weren't able to play together very well. seized left before the end of the trial period and we signed electronic. This is when a period of progress began, and we trained a lot. In 2018 we once more became the second-best team in the world, and made it to the final of the FACEIT Major. We didn't have good team preparation going into the Major, but despite that, our individual form, which had developed as the year progressed, was on a high level. We sustained a lopsided loss to Astralis in the final. In 2019 we lost to ENCE in the semi-finals of IEM Katowice, where we were leading 12-6 on the final map. Some time later, I was kicked from the team.

Why is it that the team never managed to win a Major?

We had three finals. After the first final, I was very worried and felt personal guilt as I had been unable to play at the required level, and despite that, we were still supposed to win. In our second final against the Brazilians, the morale component decided it all. Judging by the gameplay, we looked better, but after we lost the first map in overtime, the team completely crumbled and we couldn't show up on our map pick. In our third final against Astralis, as I mentioned previously, we lost without a chance. On a side note, we came into that event lacking competitive confidence, yet we still managed to make it to the final.

Were you aware that you had been on the shortlist to be replaced for a long while?

One time in 2018, Zeus secretly told me that the players were talking to Zolotarev (NAVI's CEO) about me. I ignored Danya's request to keep it a secret and I assembled the entire team to express what I felt about the situation and that I was unhappy with it. There's no smoke without a fire, though, and it's true that my performance wasn't great, I was in a slump. Immediately after that conversation, I had a slight performance improvement and we won three tournaments in a row: StarSeries Season 5, CAC 2018, and ESL One Cologne, where we beat Astralis in the semi-finals. Then, we had ELEAGUE in Atlanta, and in between the group stage and playoffs, we had approximately a five-day break. We threw that time away by relaxing and hanging out, neglecting the team completely. After three consecutive tournament victories, we could have comfortably become the best team in the world, but we chose to hang out. It seems the younger guys weren't yet ready mentally, while Danya (Zeus) and I, who were a bit older, didn't prevent this from happening. We played out ELEAGUE, and the momentum we had after built our conversation had disappeared. Teamplay was non-existent and everyone was focused on individual preparation. I never shared this approach, but I didn't say anything despite being categorically against it in spirit. I find it more important to break down demos together and discuss things than play FPL until the morning hours and hang out, but they shouldn't be heavily judged for that. At their age, I was much the same, and only with years behind your back do you truly understand what needs to be done. Some aspects of life or work can be explained to you in detail, but you'll only truly understand them once you go through it yourself. Six months after ELEAGUE I was kicked.

Edward's last hurrah with NAVI at StarSeries i-League Season 7

When did you realise that you would not remain in NAVI?

I had a feeling that there were conversations going on behind my back. Internal conversations had also changed. If earlier it was the case that management would consider the older players' opinion first — to put it simply, Danya (Zeus) and I would have deciding power —, later it became apparent that that was no longer the case and we had become normal players. That's normal, though, I have nothing against it. At the time, no one was operating the team and things were left to go with the flow, and in that situation, s1mple became a key figure by taking the reins, and the organization obviously supported him. Now B1ad3 and Sasha (s1mple) make the decisions.

How did they let you know it was over?

We were eliminated from the group stage of ESL Pro League and Ugin (NAVI's Manager) let me know that the team wanted to remove me. Half an hour later we got together and the players confirmed this, saying that they wanted to get Boombl4 instead. I just wished them luck, but the decision definitely benefited them. I can't deny that it has become easier for Sasha (s1mple), Denis (electronic) and Egor (flamie) to play with Kirill (Boombl4) and Ilya (Perfecto), if compared to playing with Danya (Zeus) and me. Even outside of the game it's easier for them to find a common ground. Initially, we didn't have problems, but with time the age gap started to have an impact.

Did you want to join Winstrike or did you do it against your will?

They asked for help after they had found themselves in a difficult situation, plus the conditions were pretty good. I moved to Moscow for three months, but of course it was a mistake to have accepted the offer. I don't know what affected my decision at the time. It seems I wanted to simply play in a team environment that I found pleasant, as towards the end of my time with NAVI that had not been the case. We had appalling performances with Winstrike, we were nervous all the time and it was difficult to get the maximum out of yourself knowing that you'd be leaving in three months.

How did the idea of creating selectah come to life?

I was approached by coach Sasha, who said he had some young players and he offered me to play with them. I was playing FACEIT and trained on DM servers, and I liked my form, so I decided to try it out. Gradually we put together an international roster that existed for a short space of time.

You can read the second part of the interview here.

Russia Alexey 'OverDrive' Birukov
Alexey 'OverDrive' Birukov
Age:
34
Team:
No team
Rating 1.0:
0.68
Maps played:
131
KPR:
0.46
DPR:
0.73
APR:
0.12
Ukraine Ioann 'Edward' Sukhariev
Ioann 'Edward' Sukhariev
Age:
32
Team:
No team
Rating 1.0:
1.00
Maps played:
1442
KPR:
0.69
DPR:
0.67
APR:
0.13
Come back, Eddy!
2020-10-31 17:01
#7
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Ukraine Kracken[oN]
forever legend
2020-10-31 17:01
Legend
2020-10-31 17:02
GOAT OF CS don’t @ me
2020-10-31 17:02
Post 2 min ago Ppl: nice, cool, legend
2020-10-31 17:04
actually feelsbadman
2020-10-31 17:05
you hang out. S1mple played all the time.
2020-10-31 17:22
1 reply
#32
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Ukraine ksay
yes s1mple is just way too pure
2020-10-31 17:27
ok
2020-10-31 17:18
Seems like a honest guy. Respect
2020-10-31 17:21
"He compensates his toxicity with immense dedication to the game" casually shitting on s1mple lmao
2020-10-31 17:22
#30
 | 
United Kingdom levymonsta
Edward with the F_1n shirt on the first pic
2020-10-31 17:25
<3edward
2020-10-31 17:31
"I remember how Kane stopped coming to training sessions and wouldn't pick up the phone. Through mutual friends we later found him in a poker club. He was at the table, sleep-deprived and hungry, and when he saw us, he said: 'Boys, I'm sorry, but I really need to win it back'. After that it became apparent that he was no longer as interested in CS, and seeing as he was the captain, we wouldn't be able to save the team." It's honestly a miracle how Kane managed to be semi-relevant for all these years by being Zeus' buddy.
2020-10-31 17:37
2 replies
He (Kane) was a poker pro. To be a poker pro you need to be a smart man. So I have no doubts he had good impact on strats/analyzing but also had bad soft-skills and was able to communicate only via Zeus, which was resulted in kick. Remember, he was won major.
2020-10-31 17:49
1 reply
He was also kicked from the team almost immediately after. I reckon what he brought to the table only barely outweighed the issues that he also came with.
2020-10-31 20:09
godward
2020-10-31 17:38
very insightful interview, nice read. looking forward to part 2!
2020-10-31 17:41
Good to see he's not trying to defend himself and take facts just as it is. Sad to see old pros to get hated and decay instead of topping some event and immediately retiring. Old virtus pro, dignitas guys, old navi guys... All of them where on the top of the world and now still trying to play in tier666 teams, being replaced by young guys. Also it's so sad they weren't started in the good times for e-sports. Playing for 10-bucks prizes, living in cafes... Things are so much better now but they're unable to benefit from it, because they're already passed their peak form. I believe Edward got pretty good paycheck (more than 500k$ perhaps?) but it's so unfair that younger players will get much more until their 30's basically by winning same-level tournaments and getting much bigger salaries than it was in 00's times. Also good to see Edward's acknowledge about seized-vs-zeus conspiracy. Seized denied this a lot of times, but I don't trust him. Also sad to see how Seized ruined his career. From top1 to practically nothing. I don't see Edward will reach anything good, just because competition now is really really strong, you have a shitload of young talents who practically over-aim any old "experienced" player. If I'd be a org, I'd never invest in old man.
2020-10-31 17:53
1 reply
#241
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United Arab Emirates R4SH4SH
True, however, I guess that's how it is, I mean, he's seen as a legend of the game, and paved the way for pro CS in the CIS region, so no matter what, a lot of people will look up to him as being one of the first pros who put Na'vi and Ukraine on the CS map, but yeah, it would've nice to see the old guys thrive with today's standards in the Esports scene. Kinda sad to see Edward get treated like that as well, you know players talking behind his back and stuff, he seems like a chill dude who's focused on the team and game, hope he finds a team and enjoys his last pro years.
2020-11-02 12:25
Dude's name isn't even Edward kek
2020-10-31 17:44
LEGENDWARD <3
2020-10-31 17:46
Edward > boombla > perfecto
2020-10-31 17:50
5 replies
indeed the only reason why they are "better" is the age, change Edward's age "rustyness" with the young age of perfect and boombla and you would easily have an easy better edward.
2020-10-31 17:52
1 reply
Let this sink in: Edward is 11 and 12 years older than Boombl4 and Perfecto, and when he was kicked his stats were not really any different from Perfecto's. People blamed him a lot for Navi failing, but for whatever reason no one seemed to notice that one of the biggest things that happened was flamie started to fall off. To flamie's credit, however, he's consistently showed up at majors since 2016. None of this is criticism of any of these players, it's just perspective. and it's interesting given some of what he's said here.
2020-10-31 20:12
also it's boomich, not boombla, the bI - stands for i and the 4 is a 'ch' sound sorry, but it grinds my gears when i see boombla instead of boomich
2020-10-31 22:10
2 replies
I think he did that intentionally
2020-11-01 01:02
1 reply
ah, well it's hard to tell haha
2020-11-01 18:57
#54
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Slovakia Daev0n
nice interview
2020-10-31 17:57
great interview, great person
2020-10-31 18:12
i could be batman but i don't want to
2020-10-31 18:16
The story of a man who sacrificed a lot to achieved his dreams... sad he will retire without a major
2020-10-31 18:21
"I had a feeling that there were conversations going on behind my back. Internal conversations had also changed... At the time, no one was operating the team and things were left to go with the flow, and in that situation, s1mple became a key figure by taking the reins, and the organization obviously supported him. Now B1ad3 and Sasha (s1mple) make the decisions." Basically he said that s1mple kicked him. Got it.
2020-10-31 18:33
"Sometimes, we were joined by a female team called Megapolis, and these trips were in the best traditions of student adventures." kkkk
2020-10-31 18:35
2 replies
That one is awesome. Party mens
2020-10-31 21:38
what a gentleman
2020-11-02 15:46
#73
 | 
Russia KaStrEek
edward alive!
2020-10-31 18:38
might have became the best team in the world for like a week or two, but nothing more hahaha what a waste of time to make this interview hahaha
2020-10-31 18:40
1 reply
Pls change flair
2020-10-31 20:17
Great interview as usual with OverDrive. Edward always seemed like a calm, serious and focused guy. His days in the 1.6 NaVi were amazing.
2020-10-31 18:51
OverDrive with indepdh intrresting questions as always gj
2020-10-31 18:49
-boombla +edward pls
2020-10-31 18:56
tbh Edward good person but as player hes not in the level anymore in tier1 , i know this is hurt but this truth
2020-10-31 19:06
Great interview. Small details, when he talks about ELEAGUE Atlanta, doesn't he mean Boston?
2020-10-31 19:08
2 replies
No, it was Eleague 2018 in Atlanta, after they've won startsries, asia championship and cologne.
2020-11-01 13:22
1 reply
Oh my bad, I thought he meant the Major, thanks :)
2020-11-01 19:22
#89
 | 
Serbia LtN))
Godward <3
2020-10-31 19:09
#90
 | 
Chile nachooww
nice read, respect to edward
2020-10-31 19:09
I could have had 4 major’s, but decided to hangout instead 🥴
2020-10-31 19:16
what a legend. only few can share the same legend status *like golden polish guys & swedishboyz
2020-10-31 19:28
☢ " s1mple's personality came through, and it inhibited everyone else on the team, bringing a lot of destruction. He compensates his toxicity with immense dedication to the game and a high level of play, so you have to decide whether you want to have the best player in the world on your team or a calm working environment. These days this isn't as pronounced as he has matured and become calmer. "
2020-10-31 19:33
Edward seems like a cool, mature guy. Good interview and GL men)
2020-10-31 19:39
epic url edward-after-three-consecutive-tournament-victories-in-2018-we-could-have-become-the-best-team-in-the-world-but-we-chose-to-hang-out
2020-10-31 19:58
Do you know SK?
2020-10-31 20:05
1 reply
Swedish SK *
2020-11-01 07:36
#136
 | 
Poland SebL
It's always great to hear how was the starts for pros. It's interesting. The beggining that has been really hard turning out to be so big in the future. The story of creating a Ukrainian superteam under NaVi's banner is really funny. Sad that Edward got benched by NaVi, but let's be honest in the final part of his journey there he had just no impact at all. They needed to do that. selectah's story is just a real mess, it feels like this team wasn't taken seriously, it feels like just a mix, not surprising that it failed.
2020-10-31 21:10
2 replies
I recommend you to read Zeus' autobiography, Against All Odds, if you haven't already. There he gives a lot more details of this pro100 / NAVI history which might be interesting for you.
2020-11-02 01:04
1 reply
#238
 | 
Poland SebL
I defienietly need to read this one.
2020-11-02 02:10
f0cusw0w come back pls.
2020-10-31 21:13
#139
 | 
Malaysia Suno[t]
TLDR: arbalet saved CIS scene POGGERS
2020-10-31 21:17
ukraine cs scene is like a soap opera
2020-10-31 21:19
4 replies
Our scene was something huge. We were contending with Swedes in terms of better scene in 2020-2011. But now our scene is dying. Old legends are already retired, but new generation is absent. Only S1mple is our last hope. For sure there are some players like B1t, and other players from NAVI.JR and Project-X.
2020-10-31 22:58
3 replies
Sure, that's not good. I've reacted to the interview - all those conspiracies, talks behind the back, kicking from the team, joining the team, etc. It seems to me like a nice soap opera. and tbh, I wouldn't have many hopes for s1mple. Great player, but would do better in another (non-team player) game.
2020-10-31 23:16
I’m sorry mate, but contending for best scene 2011-2020? You have zero majors while Sweden and Denmark both have four. You are not even top three best CS countries the last decade
2020-11-01 01:11
1 reply
He meant 2002-2011 probably, old NAVI won 4 majors 2010-11
2020-11-02 01:10
And edward consistent bottom fragger in navi in the past 2 years. So are you kidding me?
2020-10-31 21:27
1 reply
#242
 | 
Ukraine FFF111
He was a consistent top fragger at his time so at least read the interview.
2020-11-02 13:21
The GOAT
2020-10-31 21:29
#146
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Latvia tibr0
millions will say ''Pistol king''
2020-10-31 21:32
Nt not even a top 10 team
2020-10-31 21:40
#150
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Ukraine Nzr0
Individual play overrated as fuck. I just cannot get why so many young dudes do not see it. Astralis were the best because of strong work ethics. Watch demos, play as much as possible as a team. Work together. Na'Vi at 2010 were the best because they worked as a team. Those 1st place spikes will never last long. Not because of how high the overall level of teams are, but simply because there are only individual players, not teams. If someone is feeling bad today - lost game. I remember those small chats on breaks between maps that were filmed in 1.6 era. Where Na'Vi would discuss what they will do, what the enemy likes to do and how to counter. Everyone participated in the talk. As everyone was aware, everyone watched demos. Fuck CS:GO.
2020-10-31 21:50
5 replies
Ok so pls dont bully because NA CS but In an interview with thorin, seang@res was talking about non-fragging IGLs, at the time guys like Ex6TenZ, Zeus, and pronax. He went on to say that fragging was easily the most overrated part of a player
2020-10-31 23:20
Astralis guys both can frag and have a great teamwork (in the one of the videos of their comms someone asks to defuse the bomb so he'll be able to buy m4 in next round, or it was suggested by other player, this is very small detail, but for me it shows how dedicated and focused they are). Zeus wasn't able to frag. Dignitas retirement home unable to frag. NEO or whatever old pro can't frag. No aim—you just playing 4v5, or, in Na`Vi case, 2v5. You can easily see how aimers outplay them.
2020-11-01 13:28
3 replies
#214
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Ukraine Nzr0
When you make the enemy team be in uncomfortable situations, everyone will easily frag anyone. That's what Astralis do. I'm not trash talking their aim skills, I'm just saying that most of their success is because of their team work. Also calmness and confidence in your team results in great aim. I'm pretty sure everyone at tier1, even tier2 are at the same level when it comes to aiming. Just remember how team Ukraine managed to win in 2017 WESG. Where bondik and edward were top fragging at the final.
2020-11-01 18:58
2 replies
>I'm pretty sure everyone at tier1, even tier2 are at the same level when it comes to aiming. So why old pro's can't frag then and constantly underperforming? Zeus and Edward was carried by s1mple and electronic two years in a row, being under 1.0 points of rating 2.0
2020-11-01 20:54
1 reply
#224
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Ukraine Nzr0
Why you bring up IGL and Edward? Maybe read the whole point. You quote out of context. Ofc they were under-performing, they played in a fucking toxic environment. Where everyone would talk behind the back before kicking. Also when it comes even to your point Edward has 0.99 in 2019 and 2018.
2020-11-01 21:35
nice
2020-10-31 22:08
Nice
2020-10-31 23:09
#164
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Switzerland FRTNTE
What a great interview, wow.
2020-10-31 23:48
Edward old school legend
2020-10-31 23:51
Great interview. I've followed his career since those early 1.6 days in pro100 and I never knew Edward was this eloquent and intelligent. Seems like a really cool guy who understands the game and esports in general. Seems to have a great head on his shoulders. Anyway, very much enjoyed all the little tidbits from his career. So many things I didn't know about. I wonder if valentiniCh was kicking himself for declining the offer from Na`Vi after seeing how successful they would go on to become.
2020-11-01 00:53
I really miss old NaVi roster. I love NaVi in any time, but with Zeus & Edward was real NaVi. rip Legend
2020-11-01 03:44
3 replies
markeloff, Edward, starix, Zeus, ceh9 the real NAVI, legendary roster of people. diamond of CS.
2020-11-01 10:40
2 replies
nostalgic names
2020-11-01 16:42
1 reply
+1 too legendary and too superior
2020-11-01 16:44
Later, Arbalet organized a LAN event in Sweden, where all four of the top Ukrainian teams were invited. There was the possibility that I wouldn't fly out to the event as I didn't have a visa. I accidentally put my passport in the washing machine, and the Czech embassy (we were supposed to fly via the Czech Republic) denied my passport. I found out that there was another embassy in Donetsk and made an appointment to see the consulate in two days. Upon arrival, I explained my situation and he told me to come back in two hours, which I did, only to be denied again. My team was practicing without me while I was travelling around the country in an attempt to get a visa. I decided to go directly to the Swedish embassy, bringing with me an A4 piece of paper that showed exactly where I'd be travelling to. HLTV sent me a letter for the embassy that said I could miss an international tournament if I didn't obtain a visa. I arrived at 6 AM, and despite getting in so early I was 30th in line and only got to the consul towards the evening. I showed him the document, explained the whole situation, and he ended up asking me: 'Do you know SK?'. I said: 'Of course I do', to which he replied: 'Great, come and pick your visa up in 40 minutes'. We ended up going to Sweden.
2020-11-01 04:57
Great interview pistol king
2020-11-01 05:06
Zeus, you, and flamie * decided to hangout
2020-11-01 10:56
give second part now. great interview.
2020-11-01 13:23
Good job. Nice one translation. I have to admit you have had a good questions, regarding the fact that the interviewer knew Edward personally it looks so nostalgic. Awaiting 2nd part
2020-11-01 14:03
#197
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Latvia tibr0
Edward is so hot and greatest player Could won 3 times fucking major
2020-11-01 15:59
#199
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Ukraine piratz0r
he was best cis player and still remains legend, same as f0rest, neo, fallen
2020-11-01 16:05
2 replies
#200
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Ukraine piratz0r
<3 Ioann.S
2020-11-01 16:14
markeloff? (top1 2010, top3 2011) starix? (top4-5 2010)
2020-11-01 16:45
One of the best interviews in cs I have ever read.
2020-11-01 17:20
#205
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Slovakia Lavend
Acutually interesting reading, thanks!
2020-11-01 17:21
Edward confirmed s0mple is toxic
2020-11-01 17:34
That is very sad....I didn't read the article. Anyways, time to get a normal job I guess. Maybe college first.
2020-11-02 01:12
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